Matilda Gibbons

Matilda Gibbons
Queen Mary, University of London | QMUL · School of Biological and Chemical Sciences

PhD student

About

5
Publications
741
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11
Citations
Introduction
Matilda Gibbons currently works at the School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, Queen Mary, University of London. Her current project is 'Do Insects Feel Pain?'.
Additional affiliations
January 2019 - June 2019
King's College London
Position
  • Student
Description
  • Using immunohistochemical staining and PCR to characterise the descending pain pathways in mice
Education
September 2016 - August 2019
King's College London
Field of study
  • Neuroscience

Publications

Publications (5)
Article
Full-text available
Insects are traditionally thought to respond to noxious stimuli in an inflexible manner, without the ability to modulate their behavior according to context. We investigated whether bumblebees’ attraction to high sucrose solution concentrations reduces their avoidance of noxious heat. Bees were given the choice between either unheated or noxiously...
Article
Modulation of nociception allows animals to optimize chances of survival by adapting their behaviour in different contexts. In mammals, this is executed by neurons from the brain and is referred to as the descending control of nociception. Whether insects have such control, or the neural circuits allowing it, has rarely been explored. Based on beha...
Preprint
Full-text available
Modulation of nociception allows animals to prioritise their survival by adapting their behaviour in different contexts. In mammals, this is executed by neurons from the brain, and is referred to as the descending control of nociception. Whether insects have this control, or have the neural circuits underpinning it, has not been clarified. Here, we...
Preprint
Full-text available
Mammals can supress their nociceptive responses to prioritise other important responses via endogenous modulation from the brain. It is well established that insects display nociception, but not whether the insect brain can modulate nociceptive processing. To address this question, we investigated whether bumblebees′ ( Bombus terrestris ) attractio...
Article
Full-text available
In certain situations, insects appear to lack a response to noxious stimuli that would cause pain in humans. For example, from the fact that male mantids continue to mate while being eaten by their partner it does not follow that insects do not feel pain; it could be the result of modulation of nociceptive inputs or behavioural outputs. When we try...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
Looking at the neurobiology and behaviour of insects for evidence of an internal pain experience (or lack thereof).