Mathilde Fort

Mathilde Fort
Université Grenoble Alpes · Department of Psychology

PhD

About

18
Publications
8,175
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240
Citations
Additional affiliations
January 2008 - December 2011
Université Pierre Mendès France - Grenoble 2
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (18)
Article
Between 6 and 9 months, while infant’s ability to discriminate faces within their own racial group is maintained, discrimination of faces within other-race groups declines to a point where 9-month-old infants fail to discriminate other-race faces. Such face perception narrowing can be overcome in various ways at 9 or 12 months of age, such as prese...
Article
Full-text available
During their first year, infants attune to the faces and language(s) that are frequent in their environment. The present study investigates the impact of language familiarity on how French‐learning 9‐ and 12‐month‐olds recognize own‐race faces. In Experiment 1, infants were familiarized with the talking face of a Caucasian bilingual German‐French s...
Article
The existence of critical or sensitive periods has been argued for cognitive functions such as language, which allows for communication with conspecifics. Faces also play a crucial role in establishing social communication. Here we discuss if critical or sensitive period concepts apply to face processing. We describe how experience shapes face proc...
Article
Full-text available
Adults and toddlers systematically associate pseudowords such as ‘bouba’ and ‘kiki’ with round and spiky shapes respectively, a sound symbolic phenomenon known as the “bouba-kiki effect”. To date, whether this sound symbolic effect is a property of the infant brain present at birth or is a learned aspect of language perception remains unknown. Yet,...
Article
Full-text available
To probably overcome the challenge of learning two languages at the same time, infants raised in a bilingual environment pay more attention to the mouth of talking faces than same-age monolinguals. Here we examined the consequences of such preference for monolingual and bilingual infants’ ability to perceive nonspeech information coming from the ey...
Article
Full-text available
By the end of their first year of life, infants have become experts in discriminating the sounds of their native language, while they have lost the ability to discriminate non-native contrasts. This type of phonetic learning is referred to as perceptual attunement. In the present study, we investigated the emergence of a context-dependent form of p...
Conference Paper
In contrast to the long-held view that the relationship between the sounds and meaning of a word is arbitrary (de Saussure, 1959), numerous more recent studies have shown an influence of sound symbolism on word perception: Perceivers systematically associate pseudowords, such as ‘bouba’ and ‘kiki’, with round and spiky shapes, respectively (adults:...
Poster
Full-text available
In contrast to the long-held view that the relationship between the sounds and meaning of a word is arbitrary (de Saussure, 1959), numerous more recent studies have shown an influence of sound symbolism on word perception: Perceivers systematically associate pseudowords, such as ‘bouba’ and ‘kiki’, with round and spiky shapes, respectively (adults:...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
A core issue in speech perception and word recognition research is the nature of information perceivers use to identify spoken utterances across indexical variations in their phonetic details, such as talker and accent differences. Separately, a crucial question in audiovisual research is the nature of information perceivers use to recognize phonet...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In this study we investigate whether paying attention to a speaker's mouth impacts 15-and 18-month-old infants' ability to process visual information displayed in the talker's eyes or mouth region. Our results showed that both monolingual and bilingual 15 month-olds could detect the apparition of visual information appearing in the eyes/mouth regio...
Article
Full-text available
Adult listeners systematically associate certain speech sounds with round or spiky shapes, a sound-symbolic phenomenon known as the “bouba-kiki effect.” In this study, we investigate the respective influences of consonants and vowels in this phenomenon. French participants were asked to match auditorily presented pseudowords with one of two visuall...
Article
Full-text available
When the auditory information is deteriorated by noise in a conversation, watching the face of a speaker enhances speech intelligibility. Recent findings indicate that decoding the facial movements of a speaker accelerates word recognition. The objective of this study was to provide evidence that the mere presentation of the first two phonemesthat...
Article
Full-text available
The goal of this study was to explore whether viewing the speaker’s articulatory gestures contributes to lexical access in children (ages 5–10) and in adults. We conducted a vowel monitoring task with words and pseudo-words in audio-only (AO) and audiovisual (AV) contexts with white noise masking the acoustic signal. The results indicated that chil...
Article
Full-text available
Seeing the facial gestures of a speaker enhances phonemic identification in noise. The goal of this study was to assess whether the visual information regarding consonant articulation activates lexical representations. We conducted a phoneme monitoring task with word and pseudo-words in audio only (A) and audiovisual (AV) contexts with two levels o...