Mathieu Lihoreau

Mathieu Lihoreau
French National Centre for Scientific Research | CNRS · Research Center on Animal Cognition

PhD

About

159
Publications
41,638
Reads
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2,456
Citations
Additional affiliations
January 2014 - present
French National Centre for Scientific Research
Position
  • Permanent Researcher
January 2014 - present
Paul Sabatier University - Toulouse III
Position
  • Researcher
January 2010 - present
The University of Sydney

Publications

Publications (159)
Article
Pollinators are exposed to numerous parasites and pathogens when foraging on flowers. These biological stressors may affect critical cognitive abilities required for foraging. Here, we tested whether exposure to Nosema ceranae, one of the most widespread parasites of honey bees also found in wild pollinators, impacts cognition in bumblebees. We inv...
Preprint
Automated behavioural monitoring is increasingly required for animal welfare and precision agriculture. In pig farming, detailed analyses of sow activity are essential to identify and reduce the risks of piglets being crushed during postural changes of their mothers. Here we introduce a new, non-invasive, fast and accurate method for monitoring sow...
Article
Whether animals can actively avoid food contaminated with harmful compounds through taste is key to assess their ecotoxicological risks. Here, we investigated the ability of honey bees to perceive and avoid food resources contaminated with common metal pollutants known to impair behaviour at low concentrations. In laboratory assays, bees did not di...
Article
Full-text available
How do bees move across the landscapes? The ERC Consolidator Grant “Pollination ecology: how do bees move across the landscape and fashion plant reproduction (Bee-Move)” aims to link the study of bee spatial foraging patterns in the field with pollen dispersal and plant reproduction success. It will identify key mechanisms of pollination on which w...
Preprint
Full-text available
Environmental stressors have sublethal consequences on animals, often affecting the mean of phenotypic traits in a population. However, potential effects on variance are poorly understood. Since phenotypic variance is the basis for adaptation, any influence of stressors may have important implications for population resilience. Here we explored thi...
Article
Full-text available
The automated quantification of the behaviour of freely moving animals is increasingly needed in applied ethology. State-of-the-art approaches often require tags to identify animals, high computational power for data collection and processing, and are sensitive to environmental conditions, which limits their large-scale utilization, for instance in...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Although LoRa modulation is known for its robustness allowing devices to communicate kilometers away, it suffers from coverage issues, especially where the density of gateways is low or in dense urban areas. However, a simple 2-hop LoRaWAN communication can seamlessly extend the network coverage and even improve both data extraction rate (DER) and...
Preprint
Full-text available
Animals regulate their diet in order to maximise the expression of fitness traits that often have different nutritional needs. These nutritional trade-offs have been experimentally uncovered using the Geometric framework for nutrition (GF). However, current analytical methods to measure such responses rely on either visual inspection or complex mod...
Presentation
Full-text available
The yellow legged hornet Vespa velutina was accidentally introduced in Europe via France. Since 18 years research and practice progressed a lot but we are globally still unable to control this invasion. Here we review success and disappointing results.
Article
Full-text available
Extended ground level structures like roads or field edges can be important cues for navigating animals, seen for example in road-following pigeons. In a landscape devoid of skyline cues but with a rectangular grid of pathways and roads, we used harmonic radar to track free-flying bumble bees, Bombus terrestris. Individual bees consistently used gr...
Article
Full-text available
Heavy metal pollution limits shouldn't just keep humans safe, but other animals too, say Coline Monchanin and Mathieu Lihoreau
Article
Full-text available
Animals have evolved cognitive abilities whose impairment can incur dramatic fitness costs. While malnutrition is known to impact brain development and cognitive functions in vertebrates, little is known in insects whose small brain appears particularly vulnerable to environmental stressors. Here, we investigated the influence of diet quality on le...
Article
Full-text available
Central place foraging pollinators tend to develop multi-destination routes (traplines) to exploit patchily distributed plant resources. While the formation of traplines by individual pollinators has been studied in detail, how populations of foragers use resources in a common area is an open question, difficult to address experimentally. We explor...
Preprint
Whether animals can actively avoid food contaminated with harmful compounds through taste is key to understand their ecotoxicological risks. Here, we investigated the ability of honey bees to perceive and avoid food resources contaminated with common metal pollutants known to impair their cognition at low concentrations (lead, zinc and arsenic). In...
Article
Environmental pollutants can exert sublethal deleterious effects on animals. These include disruption of cognitive functions underlying crucial behaviours. While agrochemicals have been identified as a major threat to pollinators, metal pollutants, which are often found in complex mixtures, have so far been overlooked. Here we assessed the impact o...
Preprint
Full-text available
Pollinators are exposed to numerous parasites and pathogens when foraging on flowers. These biological stressors may affect critical cognitive abilities required for foraging. Here, we tested whether exposure to Nosema ceranae , one of the most widespread parasite of honey bees also found in wild pollinators, impacts cognition in bumblebees. We inv...
Article
Full-text available
Pollutants can have severe detrimental effects on insects, even at sublethal doses, damaging developmental and cognitive processes involved in crucial behaviours. Agrochemicals have been identified as important causes of pollinator declines, but the impacts of other anthropogenic compounds, such as metallic trace elements in soils and waters, have...
Article
Full-text available
The current decline of invertebrates worldwide is alarming. Several potential causes have been proposed but metal pollutants, while being widespread in the air, soils and water, have so far been largely overlooked. Here, we reviewed the results of 527 observations of the effects of arsenic, cadmium, lead and mercury on terrestrial invertebrates. Th...
Article
Full-text available
Parasites alter the physiology and behaviour of their hosts. In domestic honey bees, the microsporidia Nosema ceranae induces energetic stress that impairs the behaviour of foragers, potentially leading to colony collapse. Whether this parasite similarly affects wild pollinators is little understood because of the low success rates of experimental...
Preprint
Full-text available
Animals have evolved cognitive abilities whose impairment can incur dramatic fitness costs. While malnutrition is known to impact brain development and cognitive functions in vertebrates, little is known in insects, whose small brain appears particularly vulnerable to environmental stressors. Here, we investigated the influence of diet quality on l...
Preprint
Animals have evolved cognitive abilities whose impairment can incur dramatic fitness costs. While malnutrition is known to impact brain development and cognitive functions in vertebrates, little is known in insects, whose small brain appears particularly vulnerable to environmental stressors. Here, we investigated the influence of diet quality on l...
Preprint
Full-text available
Central place foraging pollinators, such as bees, tend to learn multi-destination routes (traplines) to efficiently visit known feeding locations and return to their nest. To what extent these routing behaviours are shared across species is unknown. Here we ran laboratory experiments to compare trapline formation and efficiency by foragers of two s...
Preprint
Full-text available
Environmental pollutants can exert sublethal deleterious effects on animals. These include disruption of cognitive functions underlying crucial behaviours. While agrochemicals have been identified as a major threat to pollinators, other compounds, such as heavy metals that are often found in complex mixtures, have largely been overlooked. Here, we...
Preprint
Full-text available
Automated quantification of the behaviour of freely moving animals is increasingly needed in ethology, ecology, genetics and evolution. State-of-the-art approaches often require tags to identify animals, high computational power for data collection and processing, and are sensitive to environmental conditions, which limits their large-scale utilisa...
Article
Full-text available
Insecticide use could be reduced if dose recommendations move from a toxicological perspective (how much is needed to kill an insect pest) to an ecological perspective (how much is needed to protect a crop).
Article
Full-text available
Insects have evolved an extraordinary range of nutritional adaptations to exploit other animals, plants, bacteria, fungi and soils as resources in terrestrial and aquatic environments. This special issue provides some new insights into the mechanisms underlying these adaptations. Contributions comprise lab and field studies investigating the chemic...
Article
Full-text available
Achieving a better understanding of the consequences of nutrition to animal fitness and human health is a major challenge of our century. Nutritional ecology studies increasingly use nutritional landscapes to map the complex interacting effects of nutrient intake on animal performances, in a wide range of species and ecological contexts. Here, we a...
Article
Full-text available
Despite growing concerns over the impacts of agricultural pesticides on honey bee health, miticides (a group of pesticides used within hives to kill bee parasites) have received little attention. We know very little about how miticides might affect bee cognition, particularly in interaction with other known stressors, such as crop insecticides. Vis...
Preprint
Full-text available
Parasites alter the physiology and behaviour of their hosts. In domestic honey bees, the microsporidia Nosema ceranae induces an energetic stress and impairs the behaviour of foragers, potentially leading to colony collapse. Whether this emerging parasite similarly affects wild pollinators is little understood because of the low success rates of ex...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding how animal movements change across space and time is a fundamental question in ecology. While classical analyses of trajectories give insightful descriptors of spatial patterns, a satisfying method for assessing the temporal succession of such patterns is lacking. Network analyses are increasingly used to capture properties of complex...
Article
Full-text available
A major difficulty in studying the behaviour of social insects, such as bees, is to collect quantitative data on large numbers of individuals and over long periods of time, in sometimes dark and not easily accessible nests. Over the past decade, connected hives equipped with large sets of sensors to monitor real-time data about bee colony health an...
Article
Full-text available
How animals explore and acquire knowledge from the environment is a key question in movement ecology. For pollinators that feed on multiple small replenishing nectar resources, the challenge is to learn efficient foraging routes while dynamically acquiring spatial information about new resource locations. Here, we use the behavioural mapping t-Stoc...
Article
Full-text available
Animals have evolved foraging strategies to acquire blends of nutrients that maximize fitness traits. In social insects, nutrient regulation is complicated by the fact that few individuals, the foragers, must address the divergent nutritional needs of all colony members simultaneously, including other workers, the reproductives, and the brood. Here...
Article
Full-text available
Honey bee foragers must supply their colony with a balance of pollen and nectar to sustain optimal colony development. Inter-individual behavioural variability among foragers is observed in terms of activity levels and nectar vs. pollen collection, however the causes of such variation are still open questions. Here we explored the relationship betw...
Article
Full-text available
Online enhancements: R code, supplemental material. Dryad data: https://dx.doi.org/10.5061/dryad.tp7519s. abstract: Animals make feeding decisions to simultaneously maximize fitness traits that often require different nutrients. Recent quantitative methods have been developed to characterize these nutritional trade-offs from performance landscapes...
Article
Full-text available
Insects use path integration (PI) to maintain a home vector, but can also store and recall vector-memories that take them from home to a food location, and even allow them to take novel shortcuts between food locations. The neural circuit of the Central Complex (a brain area that receives compass and optic flow information) forms a plausible substr...
Research Proposal
Full-text available
https://methodsblog.com/2019/03/26/research-gaps-in-animal-social-network-analysis/ Here at Methods in Ecology & Evolution and the Journal of Animal Ecology we are excited by the new directions that the next decade of research into animal social networks will bring. We hope to encourage new advances in the study of animal social networks by callin...
Article
Full-text available
Background Individual bees exhibit complex movement patterns to efficiently exploit small areas within larger plant populations. How such individual spatial behaviours scale up to the collective level, when several foragers visit a common area, has remained challenging to investigate, both because of the low resolution of field movement data and th...
Chapter
Over the past decades, research on insect cognition has made considerable advances in describing the ability of model species (in particular bees and fruit flies) to achieve cognitive tasks once thought to be unique to vertebrates, and investigating how these may be implemented in a miniature brain. While this lab-based research is critical to unde...
Article
Full-text available
Microbes influence a wide range of host social behaviors and vice versa. So far, however, the mechanisms underpinning these complex interactions remain poorly understood. In social animals, where individuals share microbes and interact around foods, the gut microbiota may have considerable consequences on host social interactions by acting upon the...