Mathieu Ardyna

Mathieu Ardyna
French National Centre for Scientific Research | CNRS · TAKUVIK

PhD in oceanography

About

53
Publications
25,351
Reads
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2,353
Citations
Citations since 2017
38 Research Items
2003 Citations
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Introduction
I am a biological oceanographer interested in understanding phytoplankton dynamics in polar environments. My main research focuses on how environnemental drivers and changes are altering phytoplankton phenology, productivity and structure. In both polar regions (i.e., the Arctic and Southern oceans), climate change is drastically affecting the interplay between the atmosphere, the cryosphere and the oceans. My recent work, conducted with collaborators, shows how these fragile polar ecosystems are responding to warmer, more acidic and longer sea-ice free oceans by combining satellite, field and autonomous platform observations. Website: http://ocean.stanford.edu/ardyna/
Additional affiliations
November 2017 - January 2020
Stanford University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • Research on new occurrence of under-ice phytoplankton blooms in the Arctic Ocean (CAP-ICE project)
January 2015 - December 2017
Sorbonne Université
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • Research on the phytoplankton dynamics in the Southern Ocean by combining satellite-derived and autonomous platform observations (SOAR project)
January 2014 - May 2014
Laval University
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • Biostatistic
Education
September 2010 - December 2014
Laval University
Field of study
  • Oceanography
September 2007 - August 2008
Aix-Marseille Université
Field of study
  • Oceanography
September 2007 - August 2010
Université du Québec à Rimouski UQAR
Field of study
  • Oceanography

Publications

Publications (53)
Article
Full-text available
Hydrothermal activity is significant in regulating the dynamics of trace elements in the ocean. Biogeochemical models suggest that hydrothermal iron might play an important role in the iron-depleted Southern Ocean by enhancing the biological pump. However, the ability of this mechanism to affect large-scale biogeochemistry and the pathways by which...
Article
Full-text available
Changes in the Arctic atmosphere, cryosphere and Ocean are drastically altering the dynamics of phytoplankton, the base of marine ecosystems. This Review addresses four major complementary questions of ongoing Arctic Ocean changes and associated impacts on phytoplankton productivity, phenology and assemblage composition. We highlight trends in prim...
Article
Full-text available
The organic carbon produced in the ocean's surface by phytoplankton is either passed through the food web or exported to the ocean interior as marine snow. The rate and efficiency of such vertical export strongly depend on the size, structure and shape of individual particles, but apart from size, other morphological properties are still not quanti...
Article
Full-text available
Marine plankton form complex communities of interacting organisms at the base of the food web, which sustain oceanic biogeochemical cycles and help regulate climate. Although global surveys are starting to reveal ecological drivers underlying planktonic community structure and predicted climate change responses, it is unclear how community-scale sp...
Article
Full-text available
Summertime wildfire activity is increasing in boreal forest and tundra ecosystems in the Northern Hemisphere. However, the impact of long range transport and deposition of wildfire aerosols on biogeochemical cycles in the Arctic Ocean is unknown. Here, we use satellite-based ocean color data, atmospheric modeling and back trajectory analysis to inv...
Article
Full-text available
En Arctique, le phytoplancton, pierre angulaire des cycles biologiques et chimiques, se manifeste par des poussées de croissance périodiques, des blooms. Le changement climatique bouleverse ce rythme, mais avec quelles conséquences ?
Cover Page
In many parts of the world, the frequency of wildfires has increased in recent years. And as the planet warms, fires are expected to continue to be longer, larger, and more frequent in boreal forests. While recent megafire events have had catastrophic impacts on human communities and ecosystems, they have also provided a glimpse into the way fires...
Preprint
Full-text available
Marine plankton form complex communities of interacting organisms at the base of the food web, which sustain oceanic biogeochemical cycles, and help regulate climate. Though global surveys are starting to reveal ecological drivers underlying planktonic community structure, and predicted climate change responses, it is unclear how community-scale sp...
Article
Full-text available
The growth of phytoplankton at high latitudes was generally thought to begin in open waters of the marginal ice zone once the highly reflective sea ice retreats in spring, solar elevation increases, and surface waters become stratified by the addition of sea-ice melt water. In fact, virtually all recent large-scale estimates of primary production i...
Article
Full-text available
The decline of sea-ice thickness, area, and volume due to the transition from multi-year to first-year sea ice has improved the under-ice light environment for pelagic Arctic ecosystems. One unexpected and direct consequence of this transition, the proliferation of under-ice phytoplankton blooms (UIBs), challenges the paradigm that waters beneath t...
Article
Full-text available
In the Antarctic Circumpolar Current region of the Southern Ocean, the massive phytoplankton blooms stemming from islands support large trophic chains. Contrary to islands, open ocean seamounts appear to sustain blooms of lesser intensity and, consequently, are expected to play a negligible role in the productivity of this area. Here we revisit thi...
Article
Full-text available
The Arctic marine biome, shrinking with increasing temperature and receding sea-ice cover, is tightly connected to lower latitudes through the North Atlantic. By flowing northward through the European Arctic Corridor (the main Arctic gateway where 80% of in- and outflow takes place), the North Atlantic Waters transport most of the ocean heat, but a...
Data
This file includes: Supplementary Methods (1) Supplementary Notes (1-10) Supplementary Figures 1 to 17 Supplementary Tables 1 to 4 References
Article
Full-text available
Climate model projections suggest a substantial decrease of sea ice export into the outflow areas of the Arctic Ocean over the 21st century. Fram Strait, located in the Greenland Sea sector, is the principal gateway for ice export from the Arctic Ocean. The consequences of lower sea ice flux through Fram Strait on ocean dynamics and primary product...
Article
Full-text available
The Green Edge initiative was developed to investigate the processes controlling the primary productivity and fate of organic matter produced during the Arctic phytoplankton spring bloom (PSB) and to determine its role in the ecosystem. Two field campaigns were conducted in 2015 and 2016 at an ice camp located on landfast sea ice southeast of Qikiq...
Article
Full-text available
The Green Edge initiative was developed to investigate the processes controlling the primary productivity and the fate of organic matter produced during the Arctic phytoplankton spring bloom (PSB) and to determine its role in the ecosystem. Two field campaigns were conducted in 2015 and 2016 at an ice camp located on landfast sea ice southeast of Q...
Article
Microbes drive most ecosystems and are modulated by viruses that impact their lifespan, gene flow and metabolic outputs. However, ecosystem-level impacts of viral community diversity remains difficult to assess due to classification issues and few reference genomes. Here we establish a ~12-fold expanded global ocean DNA virome dataset of 195,728 vi...
Article
Full-text available
The detrainment of organic matter from the mixed layer, a process known as the mixed layer pump (ML pump), has long been overlooked in carbon export budgets. Recently, the ML pump has been investigated at seasonal scale and appeared to contribute significantly to particulate organic carbon export to the mesopelagic zone, especially at high latitude...
Article
Full-text available
Oceanic gateways are sensitive to climate driven processes. By connecting oceans, they have a global influence on marine biological production and biogeochemical cycles. The furthest north of these gateways is Nares Strait at the top of the North Water between Greenland and Ellesmere Island (Canada). This gateway is globally beneficial, first by su...
Article
Full-text available
The rapid physical changes affecting the Arctic Ocean alter the growth conditions of primary producers. In this context, a crucial question is whether these changes will affect the composition of phytoplankton communities, augment their productivity, and eventually enhance food webs. We combined satellite and model products with in situ datasets co...
Article
Full-text available
In mid-and high-latitude oceans, winter surface cooling and strong winds drive turbulent mixing that carries phytoplankton to depths of several hundred metres, well below the sunlit layer. This downward mixing, in combination with low solar radiation, drastically limits phytoplankton growth during the winter, especially that of the diatoms and othe...
Article
The contiguous Arctic shelf is the green belt of the Arctic Ocean. Phytoplankton dynamics in this environment are driven by extreme physical gradients and by rapid climate change, which influence light and nutrient availability as well as the growth and ecological characteristics of phytoplankton. A large dataset collected across the Canadian Beauf...
Article
Full-text available
The Southern Ocean (SO) hosts plankton communities that impact the biogeochemical cycles of the global ocean. However, weather conditions in the SO restrict mainly in situ observations of plankton communities to spring and summer, preventing the description of biological successions at an annual scale. Here, we use shipboard observations collected...
Article
Full-text available
Protist (> 2 μm) taxonomic composition was investigated for the first time in 4 Labrador fjords (Nachvak, Saglek, Okak and Anaktalak) during summers 2007 and 2013, early fall 2010 and late fall 2009. Protist composition was significantly different from one season to another. Significant spatial differences in protist composition were found only dur...
Article
Full-text available
Phytoplankton blooms in the Barents Sea are highly sensitive to seasonal and interannual changes in sea ice extent, water mass distribution, and oceanic fronts. With the ongoing increase of Atlantic Water inflows, we expect an impact on these blooms. Here, we use a state-of-the-art collection of in situ hydro-geochemical data for the period 1998-20...
Data
This supporting information provides details on the primary production model adapted to the Southern Ocean (Text S1). Text S2 describes the clustering K-means method (Text S2), which allows the characterization of the bio-regions in the Southern Ocean (SO). Text S3 shows additional results on the wind stress and mixed layer depth according the diff...
Article
The Southern Ocean (SO), an area highly sensitive to climate change, is currently experiencing rapid warming and freshening. Such drastic physical changes might significantly alter the SO's biological pump. For more accurate predictions of the possible evolution of this pump, a better understanding of the environmental factors controlling SO phytop...
Data
This dataset provides the location of different provinces of the Southern Ocean, based on a cluster K-means analysis. The matrix is composed of three columns: latitude, longitude and index of provinces. Each row is associated with a single pixel. The analysis was performed on climatological and normalized annual chl a cycle, in order to statistica...
Article
Full-text available
The Canadian Arctic shelters millions of seabirds each year during the breeding season. By the excretion of important quantities of guano, seabirds locally concentrate nutrient-rich organic matter in the marine areas surrounding colonies. Seabirds, acting as biological vectors of nutrients, can markedly affect terrestrial ecosystems, but their infl...
Article
This paper provides a synthesis of available in situ primary production (PP) measurements from the Pacific Arctic Region (PAR), collected between 1950 and 2012. Seasonal integrated primary production (IPP) across the PAR was calculated from 524 profiles, 340 of which were also analyzed to determine the average vertical distribution of PP rates for...
Article
Full-text available
We investigated 32 net primary productivity (NPP) models by assessing skills to reproduce integrated NPP in the Arctic Ocean. The models were provided with two sources each of surface chlorophyll-a concentration (chlorophyll), photosynthetically available radiation (PAR), sea surface temperature (SST), and mixed-layer depth (MLD). The models were m...
Thesis
Full-text available
The Arctic Ocean is currently experiencing major and abrupt changes in its atmospheric and oceanic compartments due to climate change. The first emerging ecological consequences to the loss of sea ice are undeniable, such as increasing annual primary production (PP) globally in the Arctic Ocean. However, in some areas, studies suggest a decrease in...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Priority Sheet on Arctic oceanography towards the 3rd International Conference on Arctic Research Planning (ICARPIII)
Article
Full-text available
Recent receding of the ice pack allows more sunlight to penetrate into the Arctic Ocean, enhancing productivity of a single annual phytoplankton bloom. Increasing river runoff may however enhance the yet pronounced upper-ocean stratification and prevent any significant wind-driven vertical mixing and upward supply of nutrients, counteracting the ad...
Article
Full-text available
Predicting water-column phytoplankton biomass from near-surface measurements is a common approach in biological oceanography, particularly since the advent of satellite remote sensing of ocean color (OC). In the Arctic Ocean, deep subsurface chlorophyll maxima (SCMs) that significantly contribute to primary production (PP) are often observed. These...
Article
Full-text available
Making science animations: new possibilities for making science accessible to the public Lubchenco (1998: 495) challenges scientists to: ''(1) address the most urgent needs of society, in proportion to their importance; (2) communicate their knowledge and understanding widely in order to inform decisions of individuals and institutions; and (3) exe...
Article
Full-text available
We assessed phytoplankton dynamics and its environmental control across the Canadian High Arctic (CHA). Environmental (hydrographic, atmospheric, sea ice conditions) and biological variables (phytoplankton production, biomass, composition) were measured along 3500 km transects across the Beaufort Sea, the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, and Baffin Bay...
Thesis
Full-text available
A large-scale biogeographic study was conducted to assess phytoplankton dynamics and its environmental control across the Canadian High Arctic. Repeated 3500 km transects across the Beaufort Sea, the Canadian Arctic Archipelago and Baffin Bay provided the opportunity to measure environmental (i.e. hydrographic structure, atrnospheric and sea ice co...

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Projects

Projects (9)
Project
The Arctic Ocean (AO) is a key component of Earth’s climate, acting as a coolant by contributing ~10% to the global oceanic carbon pump. Its capacity to remove carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere comes from its cold waters that favour CO2 dissolution and its highly productive continental shelves that help sequester this carbon. Yet, the AO is warming at an unprecedented rate and the local and global consequences of its rapid evolution remain uncertain. The Last Ice Area (LIA), north of Canada and Greenland, is the last sanctuary of multiyear sea ice in the AO. The LIA includes the Lincoln Sea, which hosts unique endemic sea ice-dependent ecosystems. However, the physical, chemical, and biological properties of the Lincoln Sea remain nearly undocumented. RED-AO aims at improving understanding of how global change influences ecosystem functioning and biogeochemical cycling in northern Baffin Bay and the Lincoln Sea – an emblematic refuge of climate change. This project proposes a pioneer oceanographic expedition during which, 4 for the first time, sea ice, hydrography, biogeochemical cycling of nutrients and contaminants, and marine ecosystems will be observed simultaneously. It will provide a comprehensive baseline for conservation efforts and allow us to study key processes related to past, present, and future climate-induced changes. This project will strengthen both the conservation and sustainable resource harvesting of this fragile region by helping to i) create and manage permanent marine protected areas supported by indigenous governments, and ii) support ecosystem-based management of commercial fisheries led by indigenous groups in the eastern Canadian Arctic.
Project
Climate change is altering the Arctic atmosphere, cryosphere, and ocean and is having a significant impact on marine primary production. Satellite observations of phytoplankton primary production over the past 20 years show a steady increase due to increased light availability and nutrient input to Arctic surface waters. Although there is consensus that climate change is having profound impacts on the Arctic marine ecosystem, controversy still exists regarding the future of Arctic primary production: will it continue to increase as the sea ice melts further, or will nutrient availability limit further production? One component of Arctic marine primary production that has received little attention is benthic primary production. Located on the seabed surface, benthic primary producers such as diatoms and macroalgae receive a steady supply of nutrients from underlying sediments. When sufficient sunlight is available, benthic producers can dominate marine primary production in shallow Arctic waters. Given that shallow shelves occupy about half of the Arctic Ocean, benthic production may be a particularly important for the Arctic marine ecosystem, but this remains poorly understood. With an expanding ice-free Arctic in summer, these new and potentially increasing nutritious carbon sources could have a significant impact on marine ecosystems and fisheries resources of Northern communities. By bringing together research groups in Canada and Denmark, a unique set of scientific capabilities and datasets (field/satellite) will provide the first comprehensive picture of Arctic marine primary production, informing contemporary and future scenarios of a changing Arctic Ocean.
Project
The general objective of this research project is to understand the dynamics of the phytoplankton spring bloom and determine its role in the Arctic Ocean of tomorrow, including for human populations. http://www.greenedgeproject.info/ PI: Marcel Babin