Mathias Wernbom

Mathias Wernbom
University of Gothenburg | GU · Department of Orthopaedics

PhD, RPT, M.Sc

About

42
Publications
82,354
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
1,760
Citations

Publications

Publications (42)
Article
Full-text available
Objective To investigate the recovery of knee flexor muscle strength evaluated with a Nordic hamstring eccentric test (NordBord) compared with an isokinetic concentric test (Biodex) during the first year after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using a hamstring tendon autograft. Design Prospective observational registry study; level...
Article
Full-text available
Background Although cardiac troponin T (cTnT) and troponin I(cTnI) are expressed to similar amount in cardiac tissue, cTnI often reach ten-times higher peak levels compared to cTnT in patients with myocardial necrosis such as in acute myocardial infarction (MI). In contrast, similar levels of cTnT and cTnI are observed in other situations such as s...
Article
Full-text available
The purpose of the present study was to compare the effects of short‐term high‐frequency failure versus non‐failure blood flow‐restricted resistance exercise (BFRRE) on changes in satellite cells (SC), myonuclei, muscle size and strength. Seventeen untrained men performed 4 sets of BFRRE to failure (Failure) with one leg and not to failure (Non‐fai...
Article
Background There is a lack of evidence of the relative effects of different exercise modes on pain sensitization and pain intensity in individuals with knee osteoarthritis (KOA). Methods Ninety individuals with radiographic and symptomatic KOA, ineligible for knee replacement surgery, were randomized to 12 weeks of twice‐weekly strength training i...
Article
Myocellular stress with high-frequency blood flow restricted resistance exercise (BFRRE) was investigated by measures of heat shock protein (HSP) responses, glycogen content and inflammatory markers. Thirteen participants (24±2 years [mean±SD], 9 males) completed two 5-day-blocks of 7 BFRRE sessions, separated by 10 days. Four sets of unilateral kn...
Article
Holm, PM, Kemnitz, J, Bandholm, T, Wernbom, M, Schrøder, HM, and Skou, ST. Muscle function tests as supportive outcome measures for performance-based and self-reported physical function in patients with knee osteoarthritis: Exploratory analysis of baseline data from a randomized trial. J Strength Cond Res XX(X): 000-000, 2020-Uncertainty on the rol...
Article
Full-text available
Low-load blood flow restricted resistance exercise (BFRRE) can stimulate whole-muscle growth and improve muscle function. However, limited knowledge exists on the effects at the myocellular level. We hypothesize that BFRRE possesses the ability to produce concurrent skeletal muscle myofibrillar, mitochondrial, and microvascular adaptations, thus of...
Article
Background and purpose: Some uncertainty persists regarding the reproducibility of the recommended core set of performance-based tests, as well as common muscle function tests, when applied in individuals with knee osteoarthritis (KOA). The purpose of this study was to investigate the intrarater reliability and agreement of the recommended core se...
Article
Objectives To investigate the effects of lower limb strength training in addition to neuromuscular exercise and education (ST+NEMEX-EDU) compared to neuromuscular exercise and education alone (NEMEX-EDU) on self-reported physical function in patients with knee osteoarthritis (KOA). Design Patient-blinded, parallel-group randomized controlled trial...
Article
Blood flow restricted resistance exercise (BFRRE) has been shown to induce increases in muscle size and strength, and continues to generate interest from both clinical and basic research points of view. The low loads employed, typically 20‐50% of the one repetition maximum (1RM), make BFRRE an attractive training modality for individuals who may no...
Article
Full-text available
Previously trained mouse muscles acquire strength and volume faster than naïve muscles; it has been suggested that this is related to increased myonuclear density. The present study aimed to determine whether a previously strength-trained leg (mem-leg) would respond better to a period of strength training than a previously untrained leg (con-leg)....
Article
Full-text available
Low‐load blood flow restricted resistance exercise (BFRE) performed to volitional failure is suggested to constitute an effective method for producing increases in muscle size and function. However, failure BFRE may entail high levels of perceived exertion, discomfort and/or delayed onset of muscle soreness (DOMS). The aim of the study was to compa...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract PURPOSE: To investigate muscle hypertrophy, strength, myonuclear and satellite cell (SC) responses to high-frequency blood flow restricted resistance exercise (BFRRE). METHODS: Thirteen individuals (24±2 years [mean ± SD], 9 males) completed two 5-day-blocks of 7 BFRRE sessions, separated by a 10-day rest period. Four sets of unilateral kn...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose: To investigate the effects of blood flow restricted resistance exercise (BFRRE) on myofiber areas (MFA), number of myonuclei and satellite cells (SC), muscle size and strength in powerlifters. METHODS Seventeen national level powerlifters (25±6 yrs [mean±SD], 15 men) were randomly assigned to either a BFRRE group (n=9) performing two bloc...
Article
Full-text available
PurposeArterial occlusion pressure (AOP) measured in a supine position is often used to set cuff pressures for blood flow restricted exercise (BFRE). However, supine AOP may not reflect seated or standing AOP, thus potentially influencing the degree of occlusion. The primary aim of the study was to investigate the effect of body position on AOP. A...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose: Blood-flow restricted resistance exercise training (BFRE) is suggested to be effective in rehabilitation training, but more knowledge is required about its potential muscle damaging effects. Therefore, we investigated muscle-damaging effects of BFRE performed to failure and possible protective effects of previous bouts of BFRE or maximal...
Article
Full-text available
Limited data exist on the efficacy of low-load blood flow-restricted strength training (BFR), as compared directly to heavy-load strength training (HST). Here, we show that twelve weeks of twice-a-week unilateral BFR (30% of 1RM to exhaustion) and HST (6-10RM) of knee extensors provide similar increases in 1RM knee extension and cross sectional are...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
cells) innside the yellow squares. Figure 5:. Number of CD68 + cells per fiber All results are presented as mean and standard deviation Large increases in muscle fiber cross sectional area have been reported after short term high frequency low-load BFRRE 1 . However, local stress responses 2 , as well as rabdomyolysis 3 , has also been reported in...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
A massive increase in myofiber area following three weeks of high frequency BFRRE was recently reported (1) . Notably, the increase was evident already after the first five-days of training, whereas no further increase in myofiber area occurred during the last 2 weeks of training. No further increase in fiber areal could be due to a saturation of t...
Article
AimHeat shock proteins (HSP) are important chaperones for stressed and damaged proteins. Low-load blood flow restricted resistance exercise (BFRE) is generally believed not to induce significant muscle damage; but is hitherto unverified with intracellular markers. Consequently, the aim of this study was to investigate the HSP response after BFRE in...
Article
Full-text available
To investigate hypertrophic signalling after a single bout of low-load resistance exercise with and without blood flow restriction (BFR). Seven subjects performed unilateral knee extensions at 30 % of their one repetition maximum. The subjects performed five sets to failure with BFR on one leg, and then repeated the same amount of work with the oth...
Article
Full-text available
Loading using variable resistance devices, where the external resistance changes in line with the force:angle relationship, has been shown to cause greater acute neuromuscular fatigue and larger serum hormone responses. This may indicate a greater potential for adaptation during long-term training. Twelve (constant resistance group) and 11 (variabl...
Article
Low-load resistance training with blood flow restriction has been shown to elicit substantial increases in muscle mass and muscle strength; however, the effect on myogenic stem cells (MSCs) and myonuclei number remains unexplored. Ten male subjects (22.8 ± 2.3 years)performed four sets of knee extensor exercise (20% 1RM) to concentric failure durin...
Article
Full-text available
Conflicting findings have been reported regarding muscle damage with low-intensity resistance exercise with blood flow restriction (BFR) by pressure cuffs. This study investigated muscle function and muscle fibre morphology after a single bout of low-intensity resistance exercise with and without BFR. Twelve physically active subjects performed uni...
Article
Full-text available
The purpose of this study was to investigate muscle activity and endurance during fatiguing low-intensity dynamic knee extension exercise with and without blood flow restriction. Eleven healthy subjects with strength training experience performed 3 sets of unilateral knee extensions with no relaxation between repetitions to concentric torque failur...
Article
Full-text available
Strength training with low loads in combination with vascular occlusion has been proposed as an alternative to heavy resistance exercise in the rehabilitation setting, especially when high forces acting upon the musculo-skeletal system are contraindicated. Several studies on low-to-moderate intensity resistance exercise combined with cuff occlusion...
Article
Full-text available
Strength training is an important component in sports training and rehabilitation. Quantification of the dose-response relationships between training variables and the outcome is fundamental for the proper prescription of resistance training. The purpose of this comprehensive review was to identify dose-response relationships for the development of...
Article
Full-text available
Strength training with low load under conditions of vascular occlusion has been proposed as an alternative to heavy-resistance exercise in the rehabilitation setting, when large forces acting upon the musculoskeletal system are unwanted. Little is known, however, about the relative intensity at which occlusion of blood flow significantly reduces dy...

Network

Cited By