Mathew Bukhi Mabele

Mathew Bukhi Mabele
Dodoma University · College of Humanities and Social Sciences

PhD
Lecturer

About

20
Publications
8,323
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281
Citations
Citations since 2017
13 Research Items
278 Citations
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Introduction
I am an environmental social scientist, working in the Department of Geography at the University of Dodoma, Tanzania. I apply decolonial theories to study human-nature relations in southern Africa. I especially explore power over framings of concepts such as conservation, Anthropocene, environmental degradation, bioeconomy and sustainability at the policy level, and resulting consequences for day-to-day resource governance and socio-ecological justice in miombo woodlands and related ecosystems.
Education
September 2014 - July 2020
University of Zurich
Field of study
  • Human Geography
September 2008 - November 2010
University of Dar es Salaam
Field of study
  • Natural Resource Management

Publications

Publications (20)
Article
Tanzania is a popular keyword in biodiversity conservation publications, but, trends in research collaborations, scientific knowledge production and authors' productivity remain underexplored. Using the Web of Science database and bibliometric analysis techniques, we fill this gap by examining the trends between 1972 and 2021. The database search p...
Article
Participatory forest management (PFM) has been applied to address declining tropical forest conditions. In the literature, there is a mixed evidence on PFM's role in improving forest conditions. However, most assessments ignore a relationship between household distance from PFM forests and impacts to non-PFM forests albeit being an essential aspect...
Article
Full-text available
Convivial conservation is presented as an anti-capitalist approach and alternative to current mainstream conservation as well as proposals for 'half-earth' and 'new conservation' approaches. This paper reviews these approaches and situates them in the global South conservation and development context. Using the Ruaha-Rungwa Ecosystem in Tanzania as...
Article
Full-text available
Given growing human influence on the earth system’s functioning, caring for nature has never been this critical. However, whether for economic interests or ‘wilderness’ preservation, attempts to save nature have been grounded on a Western scientific philosophy of separating it from people’s ways of living, especially through ‘protected areas’. Unde...
Article
Is charcoal a sustainable energy source in Africa? This is a crucial question, given charcoal's key importance to urban energy. In today's dominant policy narrative – the charcoal-crisis narrative – charcoal is deemed incompatible with sustainable and modern energy, blamed for looming ecological catastrophe, and demanding replacement. However, an e...
Article
Full-text available
Contemporary and market-based conservation policies, constructed as rational, neutral and apolitical, are being pursued around the world in the aim of staving off multiple, unfolding and overlapping environmental crises. However, the substantial body of research that examines the dominance of neoliberal environmental policies has paid relatively li...
Article
Full-text available
Multiple proposals for transforming biodiversity conservation have been put forward, yet critical exploration of how transformative change is conceptualised in this context is lacking. Drawing on transformations to sustainability scholarship, we review recent proposals for transformative change in biodiversity conservation, considering the suggeste...
Article
Charcoal production in the miombo woodlands has motivated policy debates over the years in central, eastern and southern Africa. Forestry ideals with colonial origins downplay the value of charcoal production and other local uses of forest resources, while current policy largely condemns the environmental effects of charcoal production. Current pol...
Thesis
This thesis explores social injustice and its root causes within the realm of environmental degradation policies and practices in the miombo woodlands of Tanzania. It provides a multi-sited ethnographic case study that examines politics, power and underlying assumptions behind the policies and practices that govern human-environment interactions in...
Article
Full-text available
Over the last 30 years, Tanzania has taken different policy approaches towards the conservation of forests. Intriguingly, from the earlier integrated conservation and development approach to the ‘newer’ green economy, the idea that providing livelihood benefits is a key strategy for achieving conservation effectiveness has dominated. This one-dimen...
Article
Over the last 30 years, Tanzania has adopted different policy approaches to conserve forests.However, the idea that providing livelihood benefits is a key strategy for achieving conservation effectiveness has persisted throughout the shift from earlier integrated conservation and development approach to the ‘newer’ green economy. This one-dimension...
Article
Full-text available
This Briefing looks at the existing strategies to confront poaching in Tanzania. With militarised strategies becoming dominant, the Briefing argues for diversified tactics to counter 'poaching', suggesting that bureaucrats and conservationists must put more efforts into addressing root causes of poaching through strategies that go beyond coercive m...
Article
Full-text available
Norway’s climate forest engagement in Tanzania, launched in 2008, not only failed to produce models that work. It ignored promising forestry initiatives that existed at the time, instead re-inventing the development wheel, write Jens Friis Lund, Mathew Bukhi Mabele and Susanne Koch.
Article
Commentary on Mongabay where we argue that assessments of the effectiveness of REDD+ finance need to go beyond the country level distribution of donor funding. See it here: https://news.mongabay.com/2016/10/is-redd-finance-really-put-to-work-in-the-right-places/
Article
Full-text available
Unless we fundamentally change our capitalist economic system, and with its drive towards infinite consumption, REDD+ will not achieve the important goal of protecting tropical forests. This is the main argument of the book “Why REDD will fail”, which challenges the common view that “getting the governance right at the local project level” (p. 57)...
Article
Full-text available
REDD+ is an ambition to reduce carbon emissions from deforestation and forest degradation in the Global South. This ambition has generated unprecedented commitment of political support and financial funds for the forest-development sector. Many academics and people-centered advocacy organizations have conceptualized REDD+ as an example of ''green g...
Research
Full-text available
This reports a review study that I did for the Mwalimu Julius Nyerere Professorial Chair in Environment and Climate Change at the University of Dar es Salaam. The review aimed at documenting the state of the art with regard to climate change and water resources nexus in Tanzania, with the intention of proposing further areas for research. I reviewe...

Network

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
CON-VIVA is grounded in the premise that conservation is critical to transformations to sustainability but that its practices need to change radically. Conservation can be effective in protecting biodiversity in places, but in toto has failed to halt global biodiversity loss. Continued habitat fragmentation and reduced funding during times of austerity compound this problem. Many conservationists now acknowledge this, leading to vigorous ‘Anthropocene’ discussions on how to reconfigure human-wildlife relations, protected areas and the role of economic development in conservation. CON-VIVA’s key objective is to conceptually refine and empirically test the prospects for one proposal emerging from these debates: ‘convivial conservation’. This new model responds to the T2S themes by moving beyond protected areas and faith in markets to build landscape, governance and funding pathways that integrate conservation and poverty reduction, while enhancing prosperity. CON-VIVA investigates the prospects for convivial conservation by comparing cutting-edge conservation cases that address human-wildlife conflict involving apex predators in Brazil, Finland, Tanzania and USA. Our hypothesis is that if ‘living with’ apex predators can be effectively combined with new forms of economic development, a transition to convivial conservation can be boosted significantly.
Project
To understand workings and contestations of deforestation discourses at the national level, and explore how they are unfolding and changing everyday practices of conservation governance in rural Tanzania. Drawing on political ecology, the project uses national REDD+ discourses and a sustainable charcoal production project in rural Kilosa to achieve its goal.