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Mateusz Woźniak

Mateusz Woźniak
Central European University Vienna · Department of Cognitive Science

About

19
Publications
6,176
Reads
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197
Citations
Citations since 2016
18 Research Items
196 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022020406080
Introduction
Currently works at the Department of Cognitive Science at Central European University in Vienna.
Additional affiliations
October 2019 - present
Central European University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
February 2017 - December 2021
Monash University (Australia)
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • Cognition and Philosophy Lab
September 2013 - January 2017
Central European University
Position
  • PhD Student
Description
  • Social Mind and Body Research group
Education
September 2013 - March 2014
Central European University
Field of study
  • Cognitive Science
February 2012 - July 2012
Radboud University
Field of study
  • Social sciences/Neuroscience
October 2010 - May 2017
Jagiellonian University
Field of study
  • Psychology

Publications

Publications (19)
Article
Full-text available
Behavioral and neuroimaging studies have demonstrated that people process preferentially self-related information such as an image of their own face. Furthermore, people rapidly incorporate stimuli into their self-representation even if these stimuli do not have an intrinsic relation to self. In the present study, we investigated the time course of...
Article
Full-text available
We investigated whether people take into account an interaction partner's attentional focus and whether they represent in advance their partner's part of the task when planning to engage in a synchronous joint action. The experiment involved two participants planning and performing joint actions (i.e., synchronously lifting and clinking glasses), u...
Article
Full-text available
In the current study, we separately tested whether coordinated decision-making increases altruism and whether it increases trust. To this end, we implemented a paradigm in which participants repeatedly perform a coordinated decision-making task either with the same partner on every trial, or with a different partner on each trial. When both players...
Article
Full-text available
Making one's actions predictable and communicating what one intends to do are two strategies to achieve interpersonal coordination. It is less clear whether these two strategies are mutually exclusive or whether they can be used in parallel. Here, we asked how the availability of communication channels affects the use of strategy to make one's acti...
Article
Full-text available
We conducted three experiments to test the effect of assumed task-relevance of self-association on the self-prioritization effect (SPE). Participants were first performing the standard matching task, and then a pseudo-word matching task, in which familiar labels from the standard task were replaced with pseudo-words. In the pseudo-words task, the a...
Preprint
Full-text available
Depersonalization is a common and distressing experience characterized by a feeling of estrangement from one’s self, body and the world. In order to examine the relationship between depersonalization and selfhood we conducted an experimental study comparing processing of three types of self-related information between non-clinical groups of people...
Article
Full-text available
The question how the brain distinguishes between information about self and others is of fundamental interest to both philosophy and neuroscience. In this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, we sought to distinguish the neural substrates of representing a full-body movement as one's movement and as someone else's movement. Participa...
Article
Full-text available
Depersonalisation is a common dissociative experience characterised by distressing feelings of being detached or 'estranged' from one's self and body and/or the world. The COVID-19 pandemic forcing millions of people to socially distance themselves from others and to change their lifestyle habits. We have conducted an online study of 622 participan...
Preprint
Full-text available
Making one’s actions predictable and communicating what one intends to do are two strategies to achieve interpersonal coordination. It is less clear whether the two strategies of achieving coordination are mutually exclusive or whether they can be used in parallel. Here, we asked how the availability of communication channels affects the use of mak...
Preprint
Full-text available
Depersonalisation is a common dissociative experience characterised by distressing feelings of being detached or ‘estranged’ from one’s self and body and/or the world. The COVID-19 pandemic forced millions of people to socially distance from others and to change life habits. We have conducted an online study on 622 participants worldwide to investi...
Preprint
Full-text available
Depersonalisation is a common dissociative experience characterised by distressing feelings of being detached or 'estranged' from one's self and body and/or the world. The COVID-19 pandemic forced millions of people to socially distance from others and to change life habits. We have conducted an online study on 622 participants worldwide to investi...
Preprint
Full-text available
The question how the brain distinguishes between information about oneself and the rest of the world is of fundamental interest to both philosophy and neuroscience. This question can be approached empirically by investigating how associating stimuli with oneself leads to differences in neurocognitive processing. However, little is known about the b...
Article
Full-text available
Recent studies suggest that we rapidly and effortlessly associate neutral information with the self, leading to subsequent prioritization of this information in perception. However, the exact underlying processes behind these effects are not fully known. Here, we focus specifically on top-down and bottom-up processes involved in self-prioritization...
Preprint
Full-text available
The last two decades have brought several attempts to explain the self as a part of the Bayesian brain, typically within the framework of predictive coding. However, none of these attempts have looked comprehensively at the developmental aspect of self-representation. The goal of this paper is to argue that looking at the developmental trajectory i...
Article
Full-text available
Do people engaged in joint action form action plans that specify joint outcomes at the group level? EEG was recorded from pairs of participants who performed coordinated actions that could result in different postural configurations. To isolate individual and joint action planning processes, a pre-cue specified in advance the individual actions and...
Article
Full-text available
Recently, Sui and colleagues (2012) introduced an experimental task to investigate prioritization of arbitrary stimuli associated with the self. They demonstrated that after being told to associate three identities (self, friend, stranger) with three arbitrary stimuli (geometrical shapes), participants were faster in a perceptual matching task to r...
Article
Full-text available
James (1890) distinguished two understandings of the self, the self as “Me” and the self as “I”. This distinction has recently regained popularity in cognitive science, especially in the context of experimental studies on the underpinnings of the phenomenal self. The goal of this paper is to take a step back from cognitive science and attempt to pr...
Data
N2 following faces in experiment 2. The appendix contains an additional analysis of N2, which replicates the findings from experiment 1. (PDF)

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