Mateusz Hohol

Mateusz Hohol
Jagiellonian University | UJ · Copernicus Center for Interdisciplinary Studies

Dr. habil.
My research focuses on mathematical cognition & conceptual and methodological issues in cognitive (neuro)science.

About

31
Publications
13,618
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294
Citations
Introduction
I'm an associate professor at the Jagiellonian University in Krakow, affiliated with Copernicus Center for Interdisciplinary Studies and PI of Mathematical Cognition and Learning Lab, JU. I'm mainly involved in experimental psychology of mathematics and theoretical cognitive science. Currently, I'm implementing the grant "Cognitive artifacts on various time scales: An integrative approach" (National Science Centre, PL). I am the author of "Foundations of geometric cognition" (Routledge 2020).
Additional affiliations
October 2018 - present
Jagiellonian University
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
January 2017 - present
SWPS University of Social Sciences and Humanities
Position
  • Lecturer
September 2015 - March 2020
Polish Academy of Sciences
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (31)
Preprint
Full-text available
Blocking facial mimicry can disrupt recognition of emotion stimuli. Many previous studies have focused on facial expressions, and it remains unclear whether this generalizes to other types of emotional expressions. Furthermore, by emphasizing categorical recognition judgments, previous studies neglected the role of mimicry in other processing stage...
Preprint
Full-text available
The Spatial-Numerical Association of Response Codes (SNARC) effect (i.e., faster left/right side responses to small/large magnitude numbers, respectively) is considered as strong evidence for the link between numbers and space. The studies have shown considerable variation in this effect. Among the factors determining individual differences in the...
Article
Full-text available
The debate between the defenders of explanatory unification and explanatory pluralism has been ongoing from the beginning of cognitive science and is one of the central themes of its philosophy. Does cognitive science need a grand unifying theory? Should explanatory pluralism be embraced instead? Or maybe local inte-grative efforts are needed? What...
Preprint
Full-text available
The present study investigated facial responses to emotional sounds that represent social (e.g., laughter, screams) and non-social domains (e.g., instrumental music). Such cross-channel responses allow for examination of mechanisms involved in spontaneous mimicry. In order to address the role of visual experience in facial response to sounds, we co...
Article
Full-text available
Cumulative transmission and innovation are the hallmark properties of the cultural achievements of human beings. Cognitive scientists have traditionally explained these properties in terms of social learning and creativity. The non-social cognitive dimension of cumulative culture, the so-called technical reasoning, has also been accounted for recen...
Chapter
Na monografię składają się teksty przygotowane przez autorów z kilku ośrodków akademickich, którzy wzięli udział w IV Letniej Szkole Kognitywistycznej odbywającej się w dniach 9-12 września 2020 roku, w Kazimierzu nad Wisłą, zorganizowanej przez dwa Instytuty Filozofii – Uniwersytetu Marii Curie-Skłodowskiej oraz Katolickiego Uniwersytetu Lubelskie...
Article
Full-text available
The numerical distance effect (it is easier to compare numbers that are further apart) and size effect (for a constant distance, it is easier to compare smaller numbers) characterize symbolic number processing. However, evidence for a relationship between these two basic phenomena and more complex mathematical skills is mixed. Previously this relat...
Presentation
My presentation is entitled "The curious idea that Māori once counted by elevens, and the insights it still holds for cross-cultural numerical research." My participation is funded by the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No. 785793. Abstract: Our ideas about numbers in prehistory are largely base...
Preprint
Full-text available
The numerical distance effect (it is easier to compare numbers that are further apart) and size effect (for a constant distance, it is easier to compare smaller numbers) characterize the analogue number magnitude representation. However, evidence for a relationship between these two basic phenomena and more complex mathematical skills is mixed. Pre...
Book
Full-text available
The cognitive foundations of geometry have puzzled academics for a long time, and even today are mostly unknown to many scholars, including mathematical cognition researchers. Foundations of Geometric Cognition shows that basic geometric skills are deeply hardwired in the visuospatial cognitive capacities of our brains, namely spatial navigation a...
Preprint
Full-text available
There is heavy debate about the mechanisms of spatial navigation by insects. Researchers tend to focus mainly on vision-based models, neglecting non-visual modalities. The capacity to navigate by layout symmetry has been reported in vertebrates. Nevertheless, there has been no direct evidence for such an ability in insects, especially regarding cen...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper, we focus on the development of geometric cognition. We argue that to under- stand how geometric cognition has been constituted, one must appreciate not only indi- vidual cognitive factors, such as phylogenetically ancient and ontogenetically early core cognitive systems, but also the social history of the spread and use of cognitive...
Article
Full-text available
The focus of this special issue of Theory & Psychology is on explanatory mechanisms in psychology, especially on problems of particular prominence for psychological science such as theoretical integration and unification. Proponents of the framework of mechanistic explanation claim, in short, that satisfactory explanations in psychology and related...
Poster
Full-text available
Sensitivity to geometry plays a considerable role in spatial navigation of various vertebrate species. This capacity has been usually explained regarding the hypothesis of the high-level geometric module and the core system of layout geometry. Recently, navigational behavior of insects is claimed to be performed via view-matching mechanism. However...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper, we argue that several recent 'wide' perspectives on cognition (embodied, embedded, extended, enactive, and distributed) are only partially relevant to the study of cognition. While these wide accounts override traditional methodological individualism, the study of cognition has already progressed beyond these proposed perspectives to...
Article
Full-text available
Replicability and reproducibility of computational models has been somewhat understudied by “the replication movement.” In this paper, we draw on methodological studies into the replicability of psychological experiments and on the mechanistic account of explanation to analyze the functions of model replications and model reproductions in computati...
Article
Full-text available
A strong link between bodily activity and number processing has been established in recent years. Although numerous observations indicate that adults use finger counting (FC) in various contexts of everyday life for different purposes, existing knowledge of FC routines and their use is still limited. In particular, it remains unknown how stable the...
Article
Full-text available
Implementation of the insects' models of navigation in the explanation of the vertebrates' spatial behavior omits some important aspects, i.e., multimodal integration. Thus, we want to ask again the initial question posed by Wystrach and Graham (2012b) pointing out that significant progress in insects' research, which suggests that we might have ha...
Article
Full-text available
According to classic cognitive science, higher cognitive processes involve amodal mental representations (Fodor, 1975), and are carried by brain regions other than sensorimotor areas (Bechtel et al., 1998). Over the last few decades, this view has been questioned. Numerous researchers argue that cognitive processes are fundamentally rooted in senso...
Article
Full-text available
In the field of numerical cognition it is often highlighted that the domain-specific systems, referred to as “Approximate Number System” (ANS), or “The Number Sense” (NS)1, constitute the basis for mathematical skills (Feigenson et al., 2004; Dehaene, 2011). However, recently, Leibovich et al. (2016) stressed the role of domain-general factors, esp...
Book
Full-text available
A collection of essays devoted to the problem of explanation in various disciplines of science and humanities: mathematics, physics, chemistry, biology, neuroscience, and economics. The issues covered include such topics as the interplay between explanation and understanding, the problem of a priori explanation, the limits of causal explanations in...
Article
Full-text available
While mathematically impaired individuals have been shown to have deficits in all kinds of basic numerical representations, among them spatial-numerical associations, little is known about individuals with exceptionally high math expertise. They might have a more abstract magnitude representation or more flexible spatial associations, so that no au...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper it has been argued that the theory of conceptual maps developed recently by Paul M. Churchland provides support for Wittgenstein’s claim that language is a tool for acting in the world. The role of language is to coordinate and shape the conceptual maps of the members of the given language community, reducing the cross-individual cogn...
Article
Full-text available
Finger counting plays an important role in mathematical cognition, especially in the acquisition of the concept of number and elementary math competence. Fingers are spontaneously used to count because of their constant availability and easiness of manipulation. Stable counting order within hand facilitates the acquisition of ordinal as well as car...
Chapter
Full-text available
A collection of essays which tackles various issues at play in the current neuroscientific, psychological and philosophical research on emotions. The authors discuss such topics as the role of amygdala in the emergence of emotions, the place of the affect within the psychological construction of the agent, insights from the research on emotions in...
Article
Full-text available
Finger counting being present in vast majority of cultures, plays very important role in the mathematical cognition. The practice of finger counting had large impact on the development of mathematics in a form we all know. Both neuropsychological studies and recent developments in cognitive neuroscience show close relationship between numerical and...
Chapter
Full-text available
A collection of essays dealing with the fundamental issues in neuroscience from methodological and philosophical perspectives. The Reader will learn about the methodological difficulties connected with the use of neuroscientific experiments in philosophical argumentation and about the nature of scientific explanation in neuroscience. In addition, t...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
Some artifacts could be called “cognitive” since they perform a representational function and facilitate or even extend human cognition. We aid ourselves by relying on many external resources. We use maps to navigate in the environment, mathematical symbols to calculate, and diagrams to make inferences. Even though a multitude of cognitive artifacts has been extensively studied by representatives of various subdisciplines of cognitive science, there persists a lack of integrative account of investigating cognitive artifacts on various time scales: proximal “here and now,” developmental, historical, and evolutionary. This project aims at filling this gap by using a new mechanistic framework. Achieving this main goal requires further developing a mechanistic continuous intertemporal integration model, extending the notion of a representational-computational mechanism to include external representations and precise analysis of spatial and temporal dimensions (i.e., component parts and operations) of “wide” cognitive systems comprising human beings and artifacts. Against this background, some classical themes of cognitive artifacts, as their taxonomy, will also be revisited with particular emphasis on the dynamical aspect of using artifacts. The project is funded from National Science Centre, Poland (Opus 22, 2021/43/B/HS1/02868, 2022–2025, PI: Mateusz Hohol).
Archived project
The project aims to identify the mechanisms of geometric cognition, which will in turn contribute to the development of the methodological foundations of the cognitive research on geometry. To achieve this objective it is necessary to answer the question of how highly advanced geometric skills are shaped as a result of the interaction between the mechanisms of spatial cognition and technical language.
Project
The objective of the project “Cognitive Science in Search of Unity” is to develop an account of unification and integration in cognitive science. Cognitive science is an interdisciplinary research field, in which methods, tools, and concepts from other disciplines are used. One can ask a fundamental question whether anything unifies the field; or whether it is not just a hotchpotch of heterogeneous research. This kind of doubt can be articulated with regard to any interdisciplinary research field. However, the existence of interdisciplinary collaboration means that there are real connections between disciplines and that their problems are related. But to really dispel the doubt against interdisciplinary research, one needs to answer the question what makes such conglomerates as cognitive science actually unified. The hypothesis is that despite diversity – or rather thanks to diversity – interdisciplinary research fields can be unified, even if there is some proclivity towards disintegration or some disciplines absorb others. The unity in question does rely on using one fundamental notion (such as “cognition” or “mental representation”) or one methodology but on assuming a common set of hypotheses about cognitive mechanisms, described on multiple levels of organization by multiple disciplines. The primary tool of unification is developing multi-level models of mental mechanisms.