Matan Singer

Matan Singer
Hebrew University of Jerusalem | HUJI · Department of Geography

Ph.D.

About

11
Publications
17,562
Reads
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200
Citations
Introduction
I am currently a post-doc fellow at the the Hebrew University, where I'm studing ways to encourage people to adopt sustainable travel behavior. My research interests include transportation, housing, and geographies of disability. My PhD dissertation at the University of Michigan examined the relationships between rail development and neighborhood urban form and housing and transportation costs affordability in the US.
Additional affiliations
January 2022 - present
Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Position
  • PostDoc Position
January 2020 - December 2021
Technion - Israel Institute of Technology
Position
  • PostDoc Position
September 2015 - January 2020
University of Michigan
Position
  • PhD Student
Education
September 2015 - January 2020
University of Michigan
Field of study
  • Urban and Regional Planning
October 2010 - June 2014
Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Field of study
  • Geography and Urban Planning
October 2007 - July 2010
Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Field of study
  • Geography and Political Science

Publications

Publications (11)
Article
Full-text available
We review a number of theories of motivation, and typologies of motivations, in psychological theory and in application to a variety of specific contexts, including shopping, eating, leisure, tourism, and travel. A recurring theme is the distinction between extrinsic (instrumental, utilitarian, functional) and intrinsic (autotelic, hedonic, experie...
Article
Recent transport equity literature suggests that accessibility analyses should move beyond mapping of the uneven patterns of access to opportunities. Instead, this literature proposes a sufficientarian approach, according to which all individuals are entitled to a minimum level of accessibility. In line with this approach, in this paper we ask: “Wh...
Article
Housing and transportation affordability is a major problem for low-income households, yet studies on the issue tend to focus on the average household. Consequently, relatively little is known about the factors that affect affordability for low-income households and the neighborhoods that are affordable to them. This study addresses these issues an...
Article
The success of transit systems, traditionally gauged through ridership metrics, must also be assessed via transit accessibility because accessibility to destinations indicates the quality of service that transit provides. Using a structural equation modeling approach, we explain transit accessibility and transit ridership in 2017 for 50 large urban...
Article
Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) has been widely reported to have a capital cost advantage over Light-Rail Transit (LRT) ranging from 4:1 to 20:1. These cost estimates are poorly grounded. Careful estimates tend to show a smaller capital-cost gap between the two technologies, but often fail to break down guideway elements and cost components, particularly t...
Article
Full-text available
Little research has been devoted to uncontested human services facilities, nor to the legal frameworks siting proposals are situated in. To address these, this paper examines group-homes that operated in Jerusalem, Israel, between 2002 and 2012, identifies and explores a range of responses group-homes encounter. Results point to only low levels of...
Article
Full-text available
This paper’s goal is to propose a set of perspectives on how mobile phones and computers might affect travel: by tapping into basic needs of travellers; by affecting some preconditions for its spatial configuration; and by altering its costs and benefits. In the age of “digital nomadism,” mobile technology is likely to play an important role for th...
Article
Full-text available
In transportation, informal transport refers mainly to the use of paratransit services in the developing world. In this paper we argue that informal travel may include, in addition to mode and users, also other travel pattern elements, such as trip planning, structure, purpose, and destination. Each of these can be placed along an axis ranging from...
Article
Full-text available
The increase in population and the expansion of built-up areas into natural and agricultural areas results in more than just loss of open spaces surrounding cities. Reduced accessibility to nature, visual intrusion of buildings into natural viewsheds, and changes in runoff requires us to assess these impacts on open spaces. Our aim in this paper wa...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
This project examines the travel behavior of individuals with cognitive impairments and their barriers to using public transport. To this end, the study develops novel interview methods such as photovoice and image vocabulary to collect travel-experience data directly from people with cognitive impairments. These data are complemented by interviews with housing service providers that have direct knowledge of the travel of individuals with cognitive impairments. Building on this, the research introduces the concept of ‘cognitive mainstreaming’ and develops policy-relevant guidelines for priority-setting in transportation decision making that address the mobility needs of people with cognitive impairments.
Project
Opposition to the siting locally unwanted land uses is commonly perceived as a major barrier to the siting of human services facilities in many cities. This comes despite evidence showing that most facilities do not encounter opposition. Such perceptions of opposition may impact the siting decisions of service providers, leading them to avoid neighborhoods in which opposition is expected to develop. These perceptions may also affect policy makers, leading to the adoption of policies based on perceptions rather than evidence. When decisions are made in this way, the result might be the adoption of policies that hinder, rather than support, the siting of human services facilities. This paper addresses this concern through the evaluation of a fair share strategy for the siting of human services facilities adopted in Israel in 2012. Building on interviews with local and national government officials and service providers, as well as a data set of group homes operating in Jerusalem in 2012, this paper examines the impact of this fair share strategy on the ability to site new group homes in Jerusalem. In Jerusalem, group homes were found to be distributed evenly among neighborhoods with varying socio-economic status, while only a small number of facilities encountered opposition. This is backed by logistic regression models that suggest group homes in Jerusalem are more likely to be sited in neighborhoods with higher incomes and that the concentration of group homes is negatively associated with opposition. Nonetheless, interviews reveal that fear of opposition was a concern raised by government officials, while service providers focused more on the adequacy of housing conditions to the needs of their clientele. These results suggest that fear of opposition has led to the adoption of a fair share strategy that might actually make it more difficult to site future group homes.
Project
The distribution of transportation services aims to improve the levels of accessibility of different populations but may also lead to increases in housing costs in accessible locations. Identifying the tradeoff between reductions in transportation costs and increased housing costs is key for evaluating the just distribution of transportation services. In this project, I examine the extent to which neighborhoods near rail stations in the U.S. are affordable to households from different income groups.