Mat Vanderklift

Mat Vanderklift
CSIRO Oceans & Atmosphere Flagship

About

123
Publications
37,113
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7,443
Citations
Citations since 2016
47 Research Items
4134 Citations
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20162017201820192020202120220200400600

Publications

Publications (123)
Article
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The protection, management and restoration of vegetated ecosystems on land and in the ocean (‘natural climate solutions’) can be a useful strategy for reducing net greenhouse gas emissions to help limit global warming. Their potential contribution to reducing net emissions has led to the development of policies and financial incentives for their pr...
Article
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Diet is fundamental to an individual’s biology because energy acquired from food constrains growth and reproduction, which subsequently influences survival. It is, therefore, important to have a strong understanding of a population’s diet for species of conservation concern, such as the green turtle (Chelonia mydas). While the diet of adult green t...
Article
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1. The residence, home range, and habitat use of juvenile (42.0–63.5 cm midline curved carapace length, CCL), subadult (68.6–84.6 cm CCL), and adult (81.9–104.2 cm CCL) green turtles (Chelonia mydas) was investigated using passive acoustic telemetry in Ningaloo Marine Park, north-western Australia. Eighty-one turtles ranging in size from 42 to 104...
Article
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Blue Carbon Ecosystems (BCEs) help mitigate and adapt to climate change but their integration into policy, such as Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs), remains underdeveloped. Most BCE conservation requires community engagement, hence community-scale projects must be nested within the implementation of NDCs without compromising livelihoods o...
Article
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Age is a fundamental life history attribute that is used to understand the dynamics of wild animal populations. Unfortunately, most animals do not have a practical or non‐lethal method to determine age. This makes it difficult for wildlife managers to carry out population assessments, particularly for elusive and long‐lived fauna such as marine tur...
Article
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Seagrasses are marine angiosperms that can live completely or partially submerged in water and perform a variety of significant ecosystem services. Like terrestrial angiosperms, seagrasses can reproduce sexually and, the pollinated female flower develop into fruits and seeds, which represent a critical stage in the life of plants. Seed microbiomes...
Article
Rationale: Around the world, biosecurity measures are being strengthened to prevent the spread of pests and diseases across national and international borders. Quarantine protocols that involve sample sterilisation have potential effects on sample integrity. The consequences of sterilisation methods such as gamma (γ) irradiation on the elemental a...
Article
Coastal wetlands are vulnerable to sea-level rise (SLR) but are also valued for their potential to provide effective nature-based solutions to climate change mitigation and adaptation. Ecological benefits from these ecosystems can be constrained under urban settings by anthropogenic disturbances and pressures, so restoration activities are promoted...
Article
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Herbivory is a key ecological process that often determines the composition and abundance of plants. Estimates of herbivory in seagrass meadows are typically lower than those in other vegetated coastal ecosystems, but herbivory can be intense when large herbivorous vertebrates are abundant. We surveyed rates of herbivory on 2 species of tropical se...
Article
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Knowledge of the movement patterns of the lemon shark Negaprion acutidens is poor in contrast to the allopatric N. brevirostis . Using acoustic telemetry, we investigated daily (diel and tidal) and seasonal patterns in residency, fidelity, home range, habitat preference, and migratory patterns along the Ningaloo coast, Australia. Thirty eight adult...
Article
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Global warming is facilitating the range‐expansion of tropical herbivores, causing a tropicalization of temperate marine ecosystems, where tropical herbivores can suppress habitat‐forming macrophytes, supporting the resilience of canopy‐free ecosystem states. However, currently we lack a thorough understanding of the mechanisms that, on one hand, s...
Article
The United Nations General Assembly calls for ecosystem restoration to be a primary intervention strategy used to counter the continued loss of natural habitats worldwide, while supporting human health and wellbeing globally. Restoration of coastal marine ecosystems is perceived by many to be expensive and prone to failure, in part explaining its l...
Chapter
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The Ningaloo coast of north-western Australia (eastern Indian Ocean) hosts one of the world’s longest and most extensive fringing coral reef systems, along with globally significant abundances of large marine fauna such as whale sharks. These characteristics – which have contributed to its inscription on the World Heritage list – exist because of t...
Article
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Reversing the decline of coastal marine ecosystems will rely extensively on ecological restoration. This will in turn rely on ensuring adequate supply and survival of propagules — for the main habitat-forming taxa of coastal marine ecosystems these are mainly fruits, seeds, viviparous seedlings, zoospores or larvae. The likelihood of propagule surv...
Article
Environmental conditions experienced by animals constrain their energy acquisition and its subsequent allocation to growth and reproduction, which ultimately contributes to population dynamics. Understanding how environmental conditions affect these physiological processes is therefore important for predicting how threatened species will respond to...
Article
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Climate change is modifying species distributions around the world, forcing some species poleward, where they can alter trophic interactions. Many tropical herbivorous fishes have successfully expanded their ranges into temperate ecosystems, and while it is clear they drive increases in herbivory rates in specific localities, little is known about...
Article
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We introduce five measures describing the system-wide behaviour of complex ecological systems. Within an information-theoretic framework, these measures account for changes in both species diversity and total biomass to describe (i) overall system change, (ii) sustainability to external pressure, (iii) shift from a baseline state and two types of r...
Article
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Ecologists often need to make choices about what body parts (tissues or organs) of an animal to sample. The decision is typically guided by the need to treat animals as humanely as possible, as well as the information that different body parts can provide. When using stable isotopes, decisions are also influenced by whether specimens would require...
Article
On coral reefs, changes in the cover and relative abundance of hard coral taxa often follow disturbance. Although the ecological responses of common coral taxa have been well documented, little is known about the ecological responses of uncommon coral taxa or of coral morphological groups across multiple adjacent reef zones. We used Multivariate Au...
Preprint
Benthic suspension feeders, such as bivalves, potentially have several different food sources, including plankton and resuspended detritus of benthic origin. We hypothesised that suspension feeders are likely to feed on detritus if it is present. This inference would be further strengthened if there was a correlation between δ13C of suspension feed...
Article
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Seagrasses provide multiple ecosystem services including nursery habitat, improved water quality, coastal protection, and carbon sequestration. However, seagrasses are in crisis as global coverage is declining at an accelerating rate. With increased focus on ecological restoration as a conservation strategy, methods that enhance restoration success...
Article
Coral reefs have been heavily affected by elevated sea-surface temperature (SST) and coral bleaching since the late 1980s; however, until recently coastal reefs of north-western Australia have been relatively unaffected compared to Timor Sea and eastern Australian reefs. We compare SST time series with changes in coral cover spanning a period of up...
Article
Full-text available
We introduce five measures describing the system-wide behaviour of complex ecological systems. Within an information-theoretic framework, these measures account for changes in both species diversity and total biomass to describe i) overall system change, ii) sustainability to external pressure, iii) shift from a baseline state and two types of resi...
Article
Full-text available
The tropicalization of temperate marine ecosystems can lead to increased herbivory rates, reducing the standing stock of seaweeds and potentially causing increases in detritus production. However, long-term studies analysing these processes associated with the persistence of tropical herbivores in temperate reefs are lacking. We assessed the season...
Article
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One of the most robust metrics for assessing the effectiveness of protected areas is the temporal trend in the abundance of the species they are designed to protect. We surveyed coral-reef fish and living hard coral in and adjacent to a sanctuary zone (SZ: where all forms of fishing are prohibited) in the World Heritage-listed Ningaloo Marine Park...
Article
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Population persistence in the marine environment is driven by patterns of ocean circulation, larval dispersal, ecological interactions, and demographic rates. For habitat forming organisms in particular, understanding the relationship between larval connectivity and meta‐population dynamics aids in planning for marine spatial management. Here, we e...
Chapter
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Ecklonia radiata is one of the most widespread kelps globally, dominating temperate reefs throughout much of Australasia and southeastern Africa. Throughout much of its range, it is the only laminarian kelp and hence plays a key role in facilitating biodiversity and driving food webs, and it underpins immense ecological and socioeconomic values. Th...
Article
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Recent increases in the frequency of extreme climate events (ECEs) such as heatwaves and floods have been attributed to climate change, and could have pronounced ecosystem and evolutionary impacts because they provide little opportunity for organisms to acclimate or adapt. Here we synthesize information on a series of ECEs in Australia from 2011 to...
Article
The Indian Ocean is home to some of the most extensive coastal blue carbon ecosystems on the planet. Together, the nations within and surrounding this ocean basin contain approximately 50% (an estimated 76,275 km²) of the world’s mangrove forests and a large, but unknown, proportion of its seagrass meadows. The nations of the Indian Ocean have an o...
Article
The restoration and protection of “blue carbon” ecosystems – mangroves, seagrasses, and tidal marshes – has potential to offset greenhouse gas emissions and improve coastal livelihoods. However, realisation of this potential relies on global investment in restoration and protection, which in turn relies on appropriate funding mechanisms that are cu...
Technical Report
Several stakeholders within the Australian seafood industry have demonstrated strong leadership by developing carbon neutral business practices. In 2017, participants in the National Seafood Industry Leadership Program challenged the industry to become carbon neutral by 2030. In response, the Fisheries Research and Development Corporation (FRDC) an...
Article
The complex life history of sea turtles presents challenges for researchers. These slow-growing, longlived reptiles occupy several habitats throughout their life cycle, including oceanic environments where they are difficult to study. Consequently, much research on sea turtle biology has focussed on the nesting environment. Yet, to effectively mana...
Article
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Reliable abundance estimates for species are fundamental in ecology, fisheries, and conservation. Consequently, predictive models able to provide reliable estimates for un- or poorly-surveyed locations would prove a valuable tool for management. Based on commonly used environmental and physical predictors, we developed predictive models of total fi...
Article
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Ocean warming is driving species poleward, causing a ‘tropicalization’ of temperate ecosystems around the world. Increasing abundances of tropical herbivores on temperate reefs could accelerate declines in habitat-forming seaweeds with devastating consequences for these important marine ecosystems. Here we document an expansion of rabbitfish (Sigan...
Article
In late April 2014 Ningaloo Reef was exposed to significant freshwater and sediment outflow following an extreme rainfall event (>200 mm in 48 h). It produced a plume of brown water of 9.63 km² that was present two days after the rainfall event. The extent of the plume decreased by 55.9% within ten days. Benthic surveys were conducted at eight site...
Article
Extreme climatic events are predicted to increase in severity as a consequence of anthropogenic climate change. In marine ecosystems, the importance of marine heatwaves (MHWs)-discrete periods of anomalously high sea temperatures-is gaining recognition. In 2011, the highest-magnitude MHW ever recorded impacted the west coast of Australia (southeast...
Article
Large mobile herbivorous fish that specialise in browsing large brown algae are particularly important on coral reefs because their activities mediate algal-coral competition. Despite this important ecological role, we have a poor understanding of the movement patterns of such large herbivorous fish, including Kyphosus bigibbus. Nineteen K. bigibbu...
Article
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Climate-driven changes are altering production and functioning of biotic assemblages in terrestrial and aquatic environments. In temperate coastal waters, rising sea temperatures, warm water anomalies and poleward shifts in the distribution of tropical herbivores have had a detrimental effect on algal forests. We develop generalized scenarios of th...
Article
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No turning back? Ecosystems over time have endured much disturbance, yet they tend to remain intact, a characteristic we call resilience. Though many systems have been lost and destroyed, for systems that remain physically intact, there is debate as to whether changing temperatures will result in shifts or collapses. Wernburg et al. show that extre...
Article
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Human activities facilitate coastal habitat transformation and homogenization. The spread of marine invasive species is one example. This in turn may influence fish recruitment and the subsequent replenishment of adult assemblages. We tested habitat complexity effect on fish (Teleostei) recruitment by experimentally manipulating meadows of the habi...
Article
Ecosystem reconfigurations arising from climate-driven changes in species distributions are expected to have profound ecological, social, and economic implications. Here we reveal a rapid climate-driven regime shift of Australian temperate reef communities, which lost their defining kelp forests and became dominated by persistent seaweed turfs. Aft...
Article
Understanding biodiversity patterns depends on data collection, which in marine environments can be prohibitively expensive. Transferable predictive models could therefore provide time- and cost-effective tools for understanding biodiversity–environment relationships. We used fish species counts and spatial and environmental predictors to develop p...
Article
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Understanding animal movement provides information that helps design effective conservation initiatives. We intuitively understand that the way animals move at large scales determines the extent of their home range and their migratory patterns - and we know that these features are relevant to decisions about the location, size and distribution of p...
Article
There is incongruity between much of the research that is ostensibly directed at improving marine conservation outcomes, and the effort that is actually needed to generate better outcomes. I argue that this is partly due to inadequate critique of basic assumptions by marine researchers. One assumption that is frequently made (explicitly or implicit...
Article
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Kelps often live in a harsh hydrodynamic environment where wave-driven dislodgement of individuals can alter the biodiversity and functioning of reef systems, and increase production in coastal ecosystems adjacent to reefs. The current paradigm is that winter storms tear kelps from reefs once hydrodynamic forces exceed attachment or tissue strength...
Article
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Stable isotope ratios of autotrophs commonly encompass a wide range and exhibit high variation. It is important to understand how the environments in which autotrophs grow influence stable isotope ratios because variation can limit our ability to make inferences. We sought to understand whether light intensity, water temperature and productivity in...
Article
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Policies on harvesting and conservation are developed in response to information about trends in the abundance of species, so making accurate estimates of abundance is important. However, estimating the abundance of sparsely distributed species is challenging, especially where direct observations are difficult. We collected observations of blacktip...
Article
Stable isotope analysis (SIA) is a powerful tool in many fields of research that enables quantitative comparisons among studies, if similar methods have been used. The goal of this study was to determine if three different drying methods commonly used to prepare samples for SIA yielded different δ(15) N and δ(13) C values. Muscle subsamples from 10...
Article
Worldwide, coastal systems provide some of the most productive habitats, which potentially influence a range of marine and terrestrial ecosystems through the transfer of nutrients and energy. Several reviews have examined aspects of connectivity within coastal seascapes, but the scope of those reviews has been limited to single systems or single ve...
Article
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We quantified simultaneously dislodgement and erosion for a dominant kelp species (Ecklonia radiata) over 1 yr, and related both to potential explanatory factors (wave exposure, temperature, and kelp fecundity). Erosion was the largest contributor of detritus, accounting for 80% of annual production. Most erosion occurred as a major pulse in autumn...
Article
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Most kelps (order Laminariales) exhibit distinct temporal patterns in zoospore production, gametogenesis and gametophyte reproduction. Natural fluctuations in ambient environmental conditions influence the intrinsic characteristics of gametes, which define their ability to tolerate varied conditions. The aim of this work was to document seasonal pa...
Article
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The functional role of macroalgae-consuming fishes is particularly important in coral reefs, as they can mediate the recovery of degraded systems when macroalgae become established. However, herbivory on coral reefs is often spatially and temporally variable, and the mechanisms that underpin variation in the consumption of algae are largely unknown...