Massimo Pieri

Massimo Pieri
DAN Europe · Reserach Division

About

41
Publications
15,802
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
394
Citations
Citations since 2017
15 Research Items
284 Citations
20172018201920202021202220230102030405060
20172018201920202021202220230102030405060
20172018201920202021202220230102030405060
20172018201920202021202220230102030405060
Additional affiliations
January 2001 - present
DAN Europe
Position
  • European Research Area Supervisor - Data Collection Coordinator

Publications

Publications (41)
Article
Inert gas bubbles in tissues and in blood have been historically considered as the only triggering factors for DCS, but now many other factors are considered to affect the final outcome of a decompression profile for a certain individual. In this sense, inflammation seems to play a relevant role, not only due to the physical damage of tissues by th...
Article
Full-text available
(1) Background: SCUBA diving can influence changes of several hematological parameters (HP) but the changes of HP in the decompression phases are still unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate any possible relationship between HP and predisposition to inert gas bubble formation after a single recreational dive. (2) Methods: Blood, obtained...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Several mechanisms allow humans to resist the extreme conditions encountered during breath-hold diving. Available nitric oxide (NO) is one of the major contributors to such complex adaptations at depth and oxidative stress is one of the major collateral effects of diving. Due to technical difficulties, these biomarkers have not so far b...
Article
Full-text available
The purpose of this study was to analyze the correlation between decompression-related physiological stress markers, given by inflammatory processes and immune system activation and changes in Heart Rate Variability, evaluating whether Heart Rate Variability can be used to estimate the physiological stress caused by the exposure to hyperbaric envir...
Article
Full-text available
The article describes a dataset of doppler ultrasound audio tracks taken on a sample of 30 divers according to the acquisition protocol defined by the Divers Alert Network. The audio tracks are accompanied by a medical evaluation for the decompression sickness risk according to the Spencer's scale levels. During the acquisition campaign, each diver...
Article
Full-text available
Divers’ health state after underwater activity can be assessed after the immersion using precordial echo Doppler examination. An audio analysis of the acquired signals is performed by specialist doctors to detect circulating gas bubbles in the vascular system and to evaluate the decompression sickness risk. Since on-site medical assistance cannot a...
Article
Divers Alert Network Europe has created a database with a large amount of dive-related data that has been collected since 1993 within the scope of the Diving Safety Laboratory citizen science project. The main objectives of this study are the grouping divers by their health information and revealing significant differences in diving parameters usin...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction: Nitric oxide (NO) plays an important role in the physiology and pathophysiology of diving, and the related endothelial dysfunction and oxidative stress roles have been extensively investigated. However, most available data have been obtained before and after the dive, whilst, as far as we know, no data is available about what happens...
Article
Full-text available
Dive computers have an important potential for citizen science projects where recreational SCUBA divers can upload the depth temperature profile and the geolocation of the dive to a central database which may provide useful information about the subsurface temperature of the oceans. However, their accuracy may not be adequate and needs to be evalua...
Article
Full-text available
Background: The physiological and pathophysiological mechanisms that govern diving, both self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (SCUBA) and breath-hold diving (BH-diving), are in large part well known, even if there are still many unknown aspects, in particular about cell metabolism during BH-diving. The scope of this study was to investiga...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction: Scuba diving is an important marine tourism sector, but requires proper safety standards to reduce the risks and increase accessibility to its market. To achieve safety goals, safety awareness and positive safety attitudes in recreational scuba diving operations are essential. However, there is no published research exclusively focusi...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction: The popularity of SCUBA diving is steadily increasing together with the number of dives and correlated diseases per year. The rules that govern correct decompression procedures are considered well known even if the majority of Decompression Sickness (DCS) cases are considered unexpected confirming a bias in the “mathematical ability”...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This study is about a system for monitoring the glucose of scuba divers while underwater. The system measures the glucose of the diver at intervals of five minutes and transmits the recorded data to the surface surpervision team. This is specifically beneficial to the diabetic scuba divers, allowing their supervisers to monitor their glucose level...
Conference Paper
Divers Alert Network (DAN) created a database (DB) with a big amount of dive related data which has been collected since 1994 within the scope of Dive Safety Laboratory (DSL) project. The aim of this study is to analyze the DB using data mining techniques. The clustering of divers by their health and demographic information and reveal significant d...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract INTRODUCTION: Neurological symptoms after breathhold (BH) diving are often referred to as "Taravana" and considered a form of decompression sickness. However, the presence of "high" gas embolism after BH diving has never been clearly shown. This study showed high bubble formation after BH diving. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We performed transth...
Article
INTRODUCTION: Insulin-dependent diabetes has been considered a scuba diving contraindication. This is currently being reconsidered for well-controlled diabetes. We developed a real-time continuous glucose monitor (CGM) to check glycemia, or blood glucose (BG), during diving, both for prospective studies and to increase diabetic diver safety, allowi...
Article
Full-text available
Decompression sickness (DCS) is a systemic disorder assumed due to gas bubbles, but additional factors are likely to play a role. Circulating microparticles, vesicular structures with diameters of 0.1 to 1.0 µm, have been implicated but data in human divers has been lacking. We hypothesized that the number of blood-borne annexin V-positive micropar...
Article
Full-text available
Breath-hold diving-induced hemoptysis (BH-DIH) has been reported in about 25% breath-hold divers (BHD) and is characterized by dyspnea, coughing, hemoptysis and chest pain. We investigated whether eNOS G894T, eNOS T786C and ACE insertion/deletion I/D genetic variants, are possible BH-DIH risk factors. 108 experienced healthy instructor BHDs with th...
Conference Paper
The main objective of the CADDY project is to replace a human buddy diver with an autonomous underwater vehicle and add a new autonomous surface vehicle to improve monitoring, assistance, and safety of the diver's mission. However, the use of robots underwater may also bring additional safety requirements. Within the scope of this research, the exi...
Article
Inert gas accumulated after multiple recreational dives can generate tissue supersaturation and bubble formation when ambient pressure decreases. We hypothesized that this could happen even if divers respected the currently recommended 24-hour pre-flight surface interval (PFSI). We performed transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) on a group of 56 hea...
Chapter
Full-text available
Compared with other sports, SCUBA diving remains a relatively safe activity but precisely defining risk is important. Diving databases such as the Diving Safety Laboratory (DSL) collection by Divers Alert Network (DAN) Europe can provide new insights into the causes of diving accidents, including decompression sickness (DCS) incidence with respect...
Article
Diving above sea level has different motivations for recreational, military, commercial and scientific activities. Despite the apparently wide practice of inland diving, there are three major discrepancies about diving at altitude: threshold elevation that requires changes in sea level procedures; upper altitude limit of the applicability of these...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction: Flying after diving may increase decompression sickness risk (DCS), but strong evidence indicating minimum preflight surface intervals (PFSI) is missing. Methods: On return flights after a diving week on a live-aboard, 32 divers were examined by in-flight echocardiography with the following protocol: 1) outgoing flight, no previous...
Article
Full-text available
The aim of this study is to observe the effects of dark chocolate on endothelial function after a series of successive apnea dives in non-thermoneutral water. Twenty breath-hold divers were divided into two groups: a control group (8 males and 2 females) and a chocolate group (9 males and 1 female). The control group was asked to perform a series o...
Article
Full-text available
Scuba and breath-hold divers are compared to investigate whether endothelial response changes are similar despite different exposure(s) to hyperoxia. 14 divers (nine scuba and five breath-holding) performed either one scuba dive (25m/25 minutes) or successive breath-hold dives at a depth of 20 meters, adding up to 25 minutes of immersion time in a...
Article
Full-text available
After repetitive deep dives, breath-hold divers are often affected by a syndrome characterized by typical symptoms such as cough, sensation of chest constriction, blood-striated expectorate (hemoptysis) and, rarely, an overt acute pulmonary edema syndrome, often together with various degrees of dyspnea. The aim of this work is an epidemiological in...
Article
Full-text available
In our previous research, a deep 5-min stop at 15 msw (50 fsw), in addition to the typical 3-5 min shallow stop, significantly reduced precordial Doppler detectable bubbles (PDDB) and "fast" tissue compartment gas tensions during decompression from a 25 msw (82 fsw) dive; the optimal ascent rate was 10 msw (30 fsw/min). Since publication of these r...
Article
Full-text available
In spite of many modifications to decompression algorithms, the incidence of decompression sickness (DCS) in scuba divers has changed very little. The success of stage, compared to linear ascents, is well described yet theoretical changes in decompression ratios have diminished the importance of fast tissue gas tensions as critical for bubble gener...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Although several issues converge in attributing to NO handling and the oxidative stress important roles in the physiology of diving and in the generation of DCI, the supporting experimental evidence is still weak and no clear preventive or curative approach can yet be outlined, with the exception of the expensive and time-consuming re-compression procedure. In our opinion, the availability of basic measurements related to diving physiology without the complications related to DCI is mandatory in order to design more targeted and efficient approaches. As a matter of caution, most available data have been obtained in relatively standard conditions, e.g., on the surface before and after the dive, but, as far as we know, little or no data is available on what happens during the dive under hyperbaric conditions. Aims of the project 1) To gather basic experimental data related to the physiology of human diving, with particular emphasis to NO handling and oxidative stress. 2) Assessment of intrinsic risk of underwater activities by recording personal and environmental parameters of the dive itself (individual and anthropometric data, behavioral questionnaire and clinical history, electronic recording of time, depth, temperature). 3) To build a database enabling to design a further project investigating approaches in the prevention and cure of DCI, as well as risk stratification in leisure and professional diving.