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Masha van der Sande

Masha van der Sande
University of Amsterdam / Wageningen University & Research / Florida Institute of Technology

Dr

About

38
Publications
27,896
Reads
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1,360
Citations
Additional affiliations
November 2017 - November 2017
Wageningen University & Research
Position
  • PostDoc Position
September 2012 - present
Wageningen University & Research
Position
  • PhD Student
Description
  • Title: Scaling from leaf to regional tropical forests: relating carbon, traits and environment (project is embedded in an EU-project: www.robinproject.info).
September 2012 - present
Wageningen University & Research
Position
  • PhD Student
Description
  • Within my PhD, I partly work with Alterra and partly with Wageningen University.

Publications

Publications (38)
Article
Full-text available
Tropical forests have long been thought to be in stable state, but recent insights indicate that global change is leading to shifts in forest dynamics and species composition. These shifts may be driven by environmental changes such as increased resource availability, increased drought stress, and/or recovery from past disturbances. The relative im...
Article
Full-text available
br/>1. Tropical fores ts play an important role in the global carbon cycle, but the drivers of net forest biomass change (i.e. net carbon sequestration) are poorly understood. Here, we evaluate how abiotic factors (soil co nditions and disturbance) and biotic factors (forest structure, diversity and community trait composition) shape three importan...
Article
Full-text available
Impacts of climate change require that society urgently develops ways to reduce amounts of carbon in the atmosphere. Tropical forests present an important opportunity, as they take up and store large amounts of carbon. It is often suggested that forests with high biodiversity have large stocks and high rates of carbon uptake. Evidence is, however,...
Article
Full-text available
1.Tropical forests store and sequester large amounts of carbon in above- and below-ground plant biomass and soil organic matter (SOM), but how these are driven by abiotic and biotic factors remains poorly understood. 2.Here, we test the effects of abiotic factors (light variation, caused by logging disturbance, and soil fertility) and biotic factor...
Article
Full-text available
Tropical forests are shifting in species and trait composition, but the main underlying causes remain unclear because of the short temporal scales of most studies. Here, we develop a novel approach by linking functional trait data with 7000 years of forest dynamics from a fossil pollen record of Lake Sauce in the Peruvian Amazon. We evaluate how cl...
Article
Full-text available
Background Fire is known to affect forest biodiversity, carbon storage, and public health today; however, comparable fire histories from across forest regions in the Amazon basin are lacking. Consequently, the degree to which past fires could have preconditioned modern forest resilience to fire remains unknown. Aim We characterised the long-term (...
Article
Full-text available
Tropical forests disappear rapidly because of deforestation, yet they have the potential to regrow naturally on abandoned lands. We analyze how 12 forest attributes recover during secondary succession and how their recovery is interrelated using 77 sites across the tropics. Tropical forests are highly resilient to low-intensity land use; after 20 y...
Article
One-third of all Neotropical forests are secondary forests that regrow naturally after agricultural use through secondary succession. We need to understand better how and why succession varies across environmental gradients and broad geographic scales. Here, we analyze functional recovery using community data on seven plant characteristics (traits)...
Article
Full-text available
Wildfires are becoming increasingly frequent and devastating in many tropical forests. Although seasonally dry tropical forests (SDTF) are among the most fire-threatened ecosystems, their long-term response to frequent wildfires remains largely unknown. This study is among the first to investigate the resilience in response to fire of the Chiquitan...
Article
Full-text available
Aims Trees dominate the biomass in many ecosystems and are essential for ecosystem functioning and human well‐being. They are also one of the best studied functional groups of plants, with vast amounts of biodiversity data available in scattered sources. We here aim to illustrate that an efficient integration of this data could produce a more holis...
Article
Full-text available
Light is a key resource for tree performance and hence, tree species partition spatial and temporal gradients in light availability. Although light distribution drives tree performance and species replacement during secondary forest succession, we yet lack understanding how light distribution changes with tropical forest development. This study aim...
Article
Full-text available
Aim Biodiversity and ecosystem productivity vary across the globe, and considerable effort has been made to describe their relationships. Biodiversity and ecosystem functioning research has traditionally focused on how experimentally controlled species richness affects net primary productivity (S → NPP) at small spatial grains. In contrast, the inf...
Article
Full-text available
Aim Terrestrial ecosystems are changing in biodiversity, species composition and functional trait composition. To understand the underlying causes of these changes and predict the long‐term resilience of the ecosystem to withstand future disturbances, we can evaluate changes in diversity and composition from fossil pollen records. Although diversit...
Article
Full-text available
Lianas, woody climbing plants, are increasing in many tropical forests, with cascading effects such as decreased forest productivity, carbon sequestration, and resilience. Possible causes are increasing forest fragmentation, CO2 fertilization, and drought. Determining the primary changing species and their underlying vital rates help explain the li...
Article
Tropical forests are converted at an alarming rate for agricultural use and pastureland, but also regrow naturally through secondary succession. For successful forest restoration, it is essential to understand the mechanisms of secondary succession. These mechanisms may vary across forest types, but analyses across broad spatial scales are lacking....
Article
Full-text available
Tropical forests are converted at an alarming rate for agricultural use and pastureland, but also regrow naturally through secondary succession. For successful forest restoration, it is essential to understand the mechanisms of secondary succession. These mechanisms may vary across forest types, but analyses across broad spatial scales are lacking....
Article
Full-text available
Hydraulic traits are important for woody plant functioning and distribution. Associations among hydraulic traits, other leaf and stem traits, and species’ performance are relatively well understood for trees, but remain poorly studied for lianas. We evaluated the coordination among hydraulic efficiency (i.e. maximum hydraulic conductivity), hydraul...
Article
Full-text available
1.Recent insights show that tropical forests are shifting in species composition, possibly due to changing environmental conditions. However, we still poorly understand the forest response to different environmental change drivers, which limits our ability to predict the future of tropical forests. Although some studies have evaluated drought effec...
Article
Full-text available
Full text link: https://rdcu.be/VZWu 1. Forest recovery following management interventions is important to maintain ecosystem functioning and the provision of ecosystem services. It remains, however, largely unclear how aboveground biomass (AGB) recovery of species-rich tropical forests is affected by disturbance intensity and post-disturbance (re...
Article
Full-text available
Tropical forests account for a quarter of the global carbon storage and a third of the terrestrial productivity. Few studies have teased apart the relative importance of environmental factors and forest attributes for ecosystem functioning, especially for the tropics. This study aims to relate aboveground biomass (AGB) and biomass dynamics (i.e., n...
Data
Full-text available
In this report we summarise work on resilience points in tropical forests at regional and site scales in Latin America. In section 1, we review the issue of tipping points and explore the likelihood of climate change-induced or land-use change induced critical change in the neotropical forest ecosystems, based on current literature and recent resul...
Thesis
Full-text available
Tropical forests are the most diverse terrestrial ecosystems. Moreover, their capacity for removal of carbon from the atmosphere makes them important for climate change mitigation. Theories predict that species use resources in a different way, and therefore high species diversity would result in more efficient resource use and higher total carbon...
Article
Full-text available
Forests account for a substantial part of the terrestrial biomass storage and productivity. To better understand forest productivity we need to disentangle the processes underlying net biomass change. 2.We tested how above-ground net biomass change and its underlying biomass dynamics (biomass recruitment, growth, and mortality) can be explained by...
Technical Report
Full-text available
In this report we summarise work on resilience points in tropical forests at regional and site scales in Latin America. In section 1, we review the issue of tipping points and explore the likelihood of climate change-induced or land-use change induced critical change in the neotropical forest ecosystems, based on current literature and recent resul...
Article
Full-text available
Aim Tropical forests store 25% of global carbon and harbour 96% of the world's tree species, but it is not clear whether this high biodiversity matters for carbon storage. Few studies have teased apart the relative importance of forest attributes and environmental drivers for ecosystem functioning, and no such study exists for the tropics. Location...
Article
Full-text available
Tropical forests are important in worldwide carbon (C) storage and sequestration. C sequestration of these forests may especially be determined by the growth of canopy trees. However, the factors driving variation in growth among such large individuals remain largely unclear. We evaluate how crown traits [total leaf area, specific leaf area and lea...
Article
Full-text available
Lianas are an important component of Neotropical forests, where evidence suggests that they are increasing in abundance and biomass. Lianas are especially abundant in seasonally dry tropical forests, and as such it has been hypothesized that they are better adapted to drought, or that they are at an advantage under the higher light conditions in th...
Article
Full-text available
Eutrophication has caused a decline of charophyte species in many shallow lakes in Europe. Even though external inputs of phosphorus are declining, internal loading of P from the sediment seems to delay the recovery of these systems. Iron is a useful chemical binding agent to combat internal phosphorus loading. However, the effects of iron addition...
Data
Full-text available
Eutrophication has caused a decline of charophyte species in many shallow lakes in Europe. Even though external inputs of phosphorus are declining, internal loading of P from the sediment seems to delay the recovery of these systems. Iron is a useful chemical binding agent to combat internal phosphorus loading. However, the effects of iron addition...

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Contribute to the conservation of biodiversity, sustainable management and to understand how logging disturbance and abiotic factors drive plant species assemblages and carbon storage across a particular land cover type in a tropical forest at local spatial scales (1 ha size).
Project
Link: robinproject.info/home Objectives: Quantify the role of biodiversity in terrestrial ecosystems in South and Mesoamerica in mitigating climate change; Quantify local and regional interactions between biodiversity, land use and climate change mitigation potential and the delivery of other key ecosystem services; Evaluate the socio-ecological consequences of changes in biodiversity and ecosystem services under climate change; Evaluate the effects of current climate change mitigation policies and actions on ecological and socio-economic conditions; Analyse the impacts of alternative land-use scenarios (and other mitigation options) aimed at maximising climate mitigation potential while minimising loss of biodiversity and ecosystem services and avoiding undesirable ecological and socio-economic effects; Provide guidance on land-use planning and other climate change mitigation options such as low carbon strategies and bio-fuel production.