Masataka Yano

Masataka Yano
Tokyo Metropolitan University | TMU · Department of Language Sciences

PhD (Linguistics)

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18
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Publications

Publications (18)
Thesis
This dissertation reports on a study that examined the temporal dynamics and adaptive nature of syntactic and semantic prediction during Japanese sentence comprehension using event-related brain potentials. Two types of sentences, containing informational conflicts either between semantic and morphosyntactic information or between semantic informat...
Article
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We conducted an event-related potential experiment using aspectual coercion to examine whether aspectual information is predictively processed prior to verb input in Japanese. In the experiment, experimental sentences were presented with two presentation durations (500 ms vs. 800 ms) to manipulate the temporal predictability of a verb. Aspectually...
Article
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Several recent event-related potential (ERP) studies have observed a left (anterior) negativity (L(A)N) in (morpho)syntactically well-formed but semantically anomalous sentences, which are often referred to as semantic reversal anomalies (e.g., The window closes someone). Such a L(A)N elicitation for semantic reversal anomalies is not expected unde...
Article
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In many languages with flexible word orders, canonical word order has a processing advantage over non-canonical word orders. This observation suggests that it is more costly for the parser to represent syntactically complex sentences because of filler-gap dependency formation. Alternatively, this phenomenon may relate to pragmatic factors because m...
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The present study conducted two event-related potential experiments to investigate whether readers adapt their expectations to morphosyntactically (Experiment 1) or semantically (Experiment 2) anomalous sentences when they are repeatedly exposed to them. To address this issue, we experimentally manipulated the probability of occurrence of grammatic...
Article
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Sentences with filler-gap dependency are more difficult to process than those without, as reflected by event-related brain potentials (ERPs) such as sustained left anterior negativity (SLAN). The cognitive processes underlying SLAN may support associating a filler with a temporally distant gap in syntactic representation. Alternatively, processing...
Article
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In many languages with subject-before-object as a syntactically basic word order, transitive sentences in which the subject precedes the object have been reported to have a processing advantage over those in which the subject follows the object in sentence comprehension. Three sources can be considered to account for this advantage, namely, syntact...
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The present study tested whether the D-linked object moves from its thematic position over the subject or it originates where it appears in non-canonical sentences in Japanese. To this aim, we conducted acceptability judgment experiments that employed island effects as a diagnosis of movement and assessed whether the D-linking status of an extracte...
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Reliably and efficiently detecting physiological differences between conditions of interest is of importance in psychophysiology. In particular, when it comes to the observation of relatively small differences, such as a P600 effect, a language-related brain potential elicited by ungrammatical sentences compared to grammatical sen- tences, inter-pa...
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The present study examined the locus responsible for the effect of emotional state on sentence processing in healthy native speakers of Japanese, using event-related brain potentials. The participants were induced into a happy, neutral, or sad mood and then subjected to electroencephalogram recording during which emotionally neutral sentences, incl...
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Self-paced reading and speeded acceptability judgement experiments on Japanese sentence comprehension were conducted to elucidate the processing mechanisms of ambiguity resolution in structural reanalysis. The results suggest that the parser attempts to maintain an initial clause-mate relationship of noun phrases in the process of reanalysis, which...
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In many languages with flexible word order, transitive sentences in which the subject precedes the object have been reported to have a processing advantage during sentence comprehension compared with those in which the subject follows the object. This observation brings up the question of why this subject-before-object (SO) order should be preferre...
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The present study examined event-related brain potential (ERP) responses to apparent Case-assignment violations to explore how morphosyntactic and semantic processing interact with each other during Japanese sentence comprehension. Consistent with previous studies on Case-assignment violation, the present results found that a Case-assignment violat...
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The processing load of sentences with different word orders in the Kaqchikel Mayan language was investigated using event-related potentials. We observed a P600 for subject-verb-object and verb-subject-object sentences as compared to verb-object-subject (VOS) sentences, suggesting that VOS order is easier to process than the other orders. This is co...
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This study examined the processing of two types of Japanese causative cleft constructions (subject-gap vs. object-gap) by conducting an event-related brain potential experiment to clarify the processing mechanism of long-distance dependencies. The results demonstrated that the subject-gap constructions elicited larger P600 effects than the object-g...
Article
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Numerous studies have found "subject gap preference" in relative clauses and cleft constructions in English, French, and other languages. In contrast, previous studies have reported "object gap preference" in cleft constructions in Japanese. However, the effect of integrating a filler and its gap may be influenced by the effect of transitional prob...

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