Masahito Tsuboi

Masahito Tsuboi
Lund University | LU · Department of Biology

Doctor of Philosophy in Biology/Animal Ecology

About

20
Publications
7,098
Reads
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351
Citations
Citations since 2016
16 Research Items
329 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022020406080100
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100
Introduction
I am an evolutionary biologist interested in macroevolution. My specific questions of interest include drivers of trait evolution at macroevolutionary scales and relationship between microevolutionary processes and macroevolutionary patterns. I use phylogenetic comparative analyses and geometric morphometrics as main tools of my research, and have growing interest in integrating these methods to population and quantitative genetic theories and tools. Currently, I study evolution of phenotypic variance-covariance matrices (P-matrix).
Additional affiliations
January 2018 - December 2020
Lund University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
April 2017 - December 2017
University of Oslo
Position
  • PostDoc Position
April 2016 - March 2017
The Graduate University for Advanced Studies
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
September 2011 - October 2015
Uppsala University
Field of study
  • Evolutionary Biology with specialization in Animal Ecology
April 2008 - March 2010
Kyoto University
Field of study
  • Ecology

Publications

Publications (20)
Article
Full-text available
Brain size is strongly associated with body size in all vertebrates. This relationship has been hypothesized to be an important constraint on adaptive brain size evolution. The essential assumption behind this idea is that static (i.e. within species) brain-body allometry has low ability to evolve. However, recent studies have reported mixed suppor...
Article
Full-text available
The brain is one of the most energetically expensive organs in the vertebrate body. Consequently, the energetic requirements of encephalization are suggested to impose considerable constraints on brain size evolution. Three main hypotheses concerning how energetic constraints might affect brain evolution predict covariation between brain investment...
Article
Full-text available
 Functional coupling, where a single morphological trait performs multiple func- tions, is a universal feature of organismal design. Theory suggests that functional coupling may constrain the rate of phenotypic evolution, yet empirical tests of this hypothesis are rare. In fish, the evolutionary transition from guarding the eggs on a sandy/rocky s...
Article
Full-text available
Sexual selection contributes strongly to the evolution of sexual dimorphism among animal taxa. However, recent comparative analyses have shown that evolution of sexual dimorphism can be influenced by extrinsic factors like mating system and environment, and also that different types of sexual dimorphism may present distinct evolutionary pathways. I...
Article
Full-text available
Phenotypic integration among different anatomical parts of the head is a common phenomenon across vertebrates. Interestingly, despite centuries of research into the factors that contribute to the existing variation in brain size among vertebrates, little is known about the role of phenotypic integration in brain size diversification. Here we used g...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding variation in rates of evolution and morphological disparity is a goal of macroevolutionary research. In a phylogenetic comparative methods framework, we present three explicit models for linking the rate of evolution of a trait to the state of another evolving trait. This allows testing hypotheses about causal influences on rates of p...
Article
Full-text available
The concept of evolvability—the capacity of a population to produce and maintain evolutionarily relevant variation—has become increasingly prominent in evolutionary biology. Paleontology has a long history of investigating questions of evolvability, but paleontological thinking has tended to neglect recent discussions, because many tools used in th...
Article
Full-text available
Brain-body static allometry, which is the relationship between brain size and body size within species, is thought to reflect developmental and genetic constraints. Existing evidence suggests that the evolution of large brain size without accompanying changes in body size (that is, encephalization) may occur when this constraint is relaxed. Teleost...
Article
Full-text available
For centuries, ecologists and evolutionary biologists have used images such as drawings, paintings and photographs to record and quantify the shapes and patterns of life. With the advent of digital imaging, biologists continue to collect image data at an ever-increasing rate. This immense body of data provides insight into a wide range of biologica...
Preprint
Full-text available
The concept of evolvability—the capacity of a population to produce and maintain evolutionarily relevant variation—has become increasingly prominent in evolutionary biology. Although paleontology has a long history of investigating questions of evolvability, often invoking different but allied terminology, the study of evolvability in the fossil re...
Preprint
Full-text available
For centuries, ecologists and evolutionary biologists have used images such as drawings, paintings, and photographs to record and quantify the shapes and patterns of life. With the advent of digital imaging, biologists continue to collect image data at an ever-increasing rate. This immense body of data provides insight into a wide range of biologic...
Article
Full-text available
The increasing availability of 3D-imaging technology provides new opportunities for measuring morphology. Photogrammetry enables easy 3D-data acquisition compared to conventional methods and here we assess its accuracy for measuring the size of deer antlers, a complex morphological structure. Using a proprietary photogrammetry software, we generate...
Article
Full-text available
Allometry is a description of organismal growth. Historically, a simple power law has been used most widely to describe the rate of growth in phenotypic traits relative to the rate of growth in overall size. However, the validity of this standard practice has repeatedly been criticized. In an accompanying opinion piece, Packard reanalysed data from...
Article
Allometry is a description of organismal growth. Historically, a simple power law has been used most widely to describe the rate of growth in phenotypic traits relative to the rate of growth in overall size. However, the validity of this standard practice has repeatedly been criticized. In an accompanying opinion piece, Packard reanalysed data from...
Article
Full-text available
The allometric relationship between brain and body size among vertebrates is often considered a manifestation of evolutionary constraints. However, birds and mammals have undergone remarkable encephalization, in which brain size has increased without corresponding changes in body size. Here, we explore the hypothesis that a reduction of phenotypic...
Article
Parasite diversity and abundance (parasite load) vary greatly among host species. However, the influence of host traits on variation in parasitism remains poorly understood. Comparative studies of parasite load have largely examined measures of parasite species richness, and are predominantly based on records obtained from published data. Consequen...
Article
Full-text available
Brain size varies greatly at all taxonomic levels. Feeding ecology, life history and sexual selection have been proposed as key components in generating contemporary diversity in brain size across vertebrates. Analyses of brain size evolution have, however, been limited to lineages where males predominantly compete for mating and females choose mat...
Article
Full-text available
The brain is one of the most energetically expensive organs in the vertebrate body. Consequently, the high cost of brain development and maintenance is predicted to constrain adaptive brain size evolution (the expensive tissue hypothesis, ETH). Here, we test the ETH in a teleost fish with predominant female mating competition (reversed sex roles) a...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
My project aims to answer 1) if within-population trait variance-covariance structures (P-matrix) can predict short and long-term trait evolution and 2) if certain variational properties constrain trait evolution. Applying state-of-the-art quantitative genetic theories and phylogenetic comparative methods to a large phenotypic dataset, my project asks if P-matrices can decrease the divide between evolution at different time scales.