Marzena Zygis

Marzena Zygis
Leibniz-ZAS · Laboratory Phonology

PhD
Researcher

About

92
Publications
28,629
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Introduction
Marzena Zygis currently works at the PB1 Laboratory Phonology, Centre for General Linguistics.
Additional affiliations
July 2000 - present
Centre for General Linguistics
Position
  • Researcher

Publications

Publications (92)
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This paper examines acoustic correlates of intonation in Polish whispered, semi-whispered and normal speech modes. In particular, it investigates correlates of utterance-final rising intonation in polar questions and falling intonation in statements. The paper examines not only properties of vowels but also properties of the following voiceless con...
Article
Full-text available
The present paper examines glottal stops and the glottalisation of word-initial vowels in Polish and German. The presence of glottal marking is studied depending on speech style (‘speech’ vs. ‘dialogue’), prominence, phrasal position, speech rate, word type, preceding segment, and following vowel height. A question is also posed about the extent to...
Article
Full-text available
The Slavic affricate represented by /č/ is tacitly or explicitly assumed to be // for all Slavic languages. In this paper we revise the affricate inventories of Polish and Czech, showing that the symbol /č/ stands for two different sounds: the palatoalveolar // in Czech and the retroflex // in Polish. This conclusion is supported by acoustic result...
Article
Full-text available
This paper shows that several typologically unrelated languages share the tendency for voiced sibilant affricates to be infrequent or missing altogether. Phonological processes examined in the paper illustrate that (1) voiceless stops undergo affrication more readily than voiced ones, and (2) voiced affricates deaffricate more commonly than voicele...
Article
Full-text available
Lateral vocalization is a cross-linguistically common phenomenon where a lateral is realized as a glide, such as [w, j], or a vowel [u, i]. In this paper, we focus on the articulatory triggers that could cause lateral vocalization. We examined Brazilian Portuguese, a language known for the process of lateral vocalization in coda position. We examin...
Article
Full-text available
This study explores ongoing lenition of postvocalic /p t k b d g/ in the Spanish of Gran Canaria. Duration, intensity and harmonics-to-noise ratio of 16,454 sounds produced by 44 native speakers were measured, with the latter phonetic parameter used for the first time to investigate lenition. The results show a path of gradual sound shortening and...
Article
Full-text available
This study reports the results of a survey conducted on 121 Polish students at three universities in Szczecin, Wrocław and Lublin. The goal was to examine what young Poles think about Germany and Germans, and to what extent their attitudes towards German people are influenced by factors such as where they live, their level of German, the frequency...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This paper reports acoustic characteristics of Polish sibilants acquired in the process of language learning. We tested the production of three phonemic sibilants /s, ʂ, ɕ/ produced by 81 Polish children ages 35 to 106 months. Our results based on an acoustic analysis complemented by a perceptual categorization test by adults reveal that the alveol...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Speakers flexibly adapt their speech production to situational demands. This study investigates the extent to which speakers adjust their articulation in terms of lip aperture depending on (i) the speech mode (normal speech vs. whispered speech where f0 is absent), (ii) the visibility of the interlocutor (visible vs. invisible), and (iii) the pragm...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This paper reports results of a production study on prosodic phrase boundaries at different speech rates. Our research question was to examine which acoustic cues (F0, intensity and duration) change as a function of speech rate both before and after prosodic phrase boundaries. We investigated identical sentences that differed in the placement of th...
Chapter
This article presents the results of a questionnaire based on a sample of 49 pupils from three Polish-German schools in Berlin. The questionnaire consisted of 166 questions divided into six thematic blocks. In addition, interviews about bilingualism and national identity were conducted. The picture of Polish-German bilingualism, which emerges from...
Chapter
Full-text available
This article presents the results of a questionnaire based on a sample of 49 pupils from three Polish-German schools in Berlin. The questionnaire consisted of 166 questions divided into six thematic blocks. In addition, interviews about bilingualism and national identity were conducted. The picture of Polish-German bilingualism, which emerges from...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The aim of the study was to conduct automatic phoneme identification from articulatory data that accompanied the production of these phonemes in continuous speech. The articulatory data were obtained from 2 electropalatographic systems, Palatometer by Complete Speech and Linguagraph by Rose-Medical. Palatometer was used with the artificial palate c...
Article
Full-text available
Developmental studies of speech perception have typically used adult productions or synthetic speech as stimuli. Little is known about how children perceive their own speech, however. Further, few studies of sibilant fricative perception have explored complex sibilant inventories. This work assessed perception of the sibilants /s, ʂ, ɕ/ in 32 monol...
Article
Full-text available
Languages vary in the type of contexts that affect prosodic prominence. This paper reports on a production study investigating how different types of foci influence prosody in Polish and Czech noun phrases. The results show that in both languages, focus and givenness are marked prosodically, with pitch and intensity as the main acoustic correlates....
Article
Full-text available
The present study aims to approach soft ‘g’, a highly disputable sound in Turkish phonetics and phonology, from a multidimensional perspective by (i) analysing its historical development, (ii) investigating its distribution in a dictionary of Modern Turkish, and (iii) studying its acoustic realization. In the Ottoman script soft ‘g’ was represented...
Article
Full-text available
This study investigates orofacial expressions, i.e., lip aperture and the movement of eyebrows in the production of German polar (yes/no) questions and statements. It also examines the production of these sentence types in normal versus whispered speech mode. For these purposes, a motion capture experiment was carried out with simultaneous acoustic...
Article
This paper examines how acoustic characteristics of vowels and consonants reflect intonational differences between polar questions and statements in Polish whispered, semi-whispered and normal speech modes, with particular focus on the spectral characteristics of voiceless consonants as a function of intonation, and across speech modes. The results...
Article
Two calling melodies of Polish were investigated, the routine call, used to call someone for an everyday reason, and the urgent call, which conveys disapproval of the addressee’s actions. A Discourse Completion Task was used to elicit the two melodies from speakers of Polish using twelve names from one to four syllables long; there were three names...
Article
Full-text available
About 35 million people around the world speak Ukrainian (Lewis, Simons & Fenning 2016). The largest populations of Ukrainian speakers outside Ukraine (more than 32 million speakers) are in Russia ( c . 4.5 million), followed by Moldova ( c . 0.6 million), Canada ( c . 0.5 million) and the USA ( c . 0.5 million). Smaller Ukrainian communities have...
Poster
Full-text available
Our study based on articulatory synthesis shows that the existence of the second major peak in Polish retroflexes and alveolo-palatals is attributed to a strong articulatory lip protrusion. In contrast, the mean spectrum of the German real speech data is comparable to the neutral lip position condition. Furthermore, our results show that the tradit...
Article
Full-text available
We present the results of an acoustic study showing that the Polish sibilant system is undergoing changes in the speech of young university-educated women. The results based on the acoustic analysis of 16 speakers’ pronunciation, reveal that the new variants of alveolo-palatals are characterised by spectral peaks at higher frequencies and higher ce...
Article
Full-text available
The Polish system of sibilants is currently undergoing changes in the speech of young women. The innovation involves alveolo-palatals and can be characterised as a change in progress in its initial stage. The change has recently come to the attention of many Poles. The new variants of sibilants connote childishness and immaturity and are heavily st...
Article
Full-text available
Two Polish melodies were investigated, the vocative chant used to call someone for a routine reason, and the scolding melody conveying disapproval of the addressee or her actions. Three repetitions of 12 Polish names (1-4 syllables long, 3 names per syllable count) were elicited from 16 speakers using a Discourse Completion Task. The results, based...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
We examine the dynamics of VOT in Polish stops under lexical stress and focus. We elicit real Polish words containing voiced and voiceless stop+/a/ syllables in primary, secondary and unstressed, as well as focus positions. We also correlate VOT with speech rate estimated on the basis of equisyllabic word length. Our results show that the relations...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Languages vary in the types of contexts that affect prosodic prominence. This paper reports on a production study investigating how different types of foci influence prosody in Polish. The results show that focus and givenness in Polish are both marked prosodically, with pitch and intensity as the main acoustic correlates. Polish patterns like En-g...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The Polish vocative chant is a melody used, as in other languages, to call someone for a routine reason. Three repetitions of 12 Polish names (1-4 syllables long, 3 names per syllable count) were elicited from 16 speakers using a Discourse Completion Task. The results, based on data from 11 speakers (6 female), showed that the contour ends in a sma...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This study investigates acoustic properties of the Polish retroflex and alveolo-palatal fricatives and affricates /ʂ/, /ʈ͡ ʂ/, /ɕ/ and /t͡ ɕ/. The sibilants were produced in (i) yes/no questions with rising intonation and (ii) answers with falling intonation. Multitaper spectra were used to compare the two places of articulation. Results show that...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The overall goal of the paper is to contribute to a better understanding of segment-prosody interaction in different speech modes. In particular, the paper shows that depending on intonation patterns, utterance-final voiceless fricatives in Polish show different properties. In polar questions with rising intonation, the frequency of the highest spe...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The aim of this study is to propose a phonologically and phonetically based explanation of soft 'g' sound in Turkish which shows different outputs in spoken language. Our lexicon based search reveals that soft 'g' has a consonantal status and is found most frequently in the intervocalic context. Our phonetic study, however, demonstrates that soft '...
Article
Full-text available
Glottal marking of vowel-initial German words by glottalization and glottal stop insertion were investigated in dependence on speech rate, word type (content vs. function words), word accent, phrasal position and the following vowel. The analysed material consisted of speeches of Konrad Adenauer, Thomas Mann and Richard von Weizsäcker. The investig...
Article
Full-text available
The article focuses on the gradient phonetic effects occurring at the prefix-stem boundary in Polish and their phonological interpretation. The environment of a consonant-final prefix followed by a vowel-initial stem exhibits remarkable variation as to the presence of specific phonetic cues, ranging from their being completely absent or very weak t...
Chapter
Full-text available
Anhand einer Auswahl historischer Reden je dreier prominenter Deutscher und Polen wird eine signalphonetisch gestützte sprachvergleichende Analyse der glottalen Markierung vokalinitialer Wörter durchgeführt. Generell erweist sich die glottale Markierung als variabel entlang eines Kontinuums zwischen einem echten glottalen Verschlusslaut (harter St...
Article
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Conference Paper
Full-text available
The present study analyzes glottal marking (i.e. glottalization and glottal stops) of vowel-initial German words in dependence on speech rate, word type (content vs. function words), word accent, phrasal position and quality of the following vowel. The material investigated consists of several speeches by Konrad Adenauer, Thomas Mann and Richard vo...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The Slavic affricate represented by <č> is tacitly or explicitly assumed to be /tS/ for all Slavic languages. In this paper I revise the affricate inventories of Polish and Czech, showing that the symbol <č> stands for two different sounds: the postalveolar /tS/ in Czech and the retroflex /TS/ in Polish. This conclusion is supported by the results...
Chapter
Full-text available
The chapter presents a typological study with an overview of the phonology of obstruents in a variety of languages using the traditional features [sonorant], [continuant], and [strident]. It shows how these features are (un)able to capture commonly occuring natural classes and phonological processes involving obstruents. Moreover, the authors take...
Article
Full-text available
The present study probes perception of place of articulation distinctions among Polish sibilants using an AX discrimination task, and compares results from 13 Polish-speaking and 10 English-speaking subjects. Besides providing information on the relative discriminability of the sibilants, the perceptual study is designed to investigate the claim th...
Article
Full-text available
The present study, based on a typological survey of ca. 70 languages, offers a systematization of consonantal insertions by classifying them into three main types: grammatical, phonetic, and prosodic insertions. The three epenthesis types essentially differ from each other in terms of preferred sounds, domains of application, the role of segmental...
Article
Full-text available
Glottal marking of vowel-initial German words by glottalization and glottal stop insertion were investigated in dependence on speech rate, word type (content vs. function words), word accent, phrasal position and the following vowel. The analysed material consisted of speeches of Konrad Adenauer, Thomas Mann and Richard von Weizsäcker. The investig...
Chapter
Full-text available
The present investigation shows that acoustics and perception play an indispensable role in shaping Slavic sibilant systems. It is empirically demonstrated that the symbol /š/, traditionally used in Slavic linguistics, corresponds to two distinct sounds in the IPA system: it denotes a postalveolar sibilant /􀔙/ in some Slavic languages, as in Bulgar...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The aim of the present study is two-fold. First, we will show that glottal stops/glottalization and low vowels are likely to co-occur in typologically different languages. Second, we will investigate the question whether this widely attested co-occurrence of glottalization and low vowels could be due to a perceptual phenomenon; i.e. differences in...
Article
Full-text available
1 marzena@zas.gwz-berlin.de, 2 fuchs@zas.gwz-berlin.de Abstract This paper shows that several typologically unrelated languages share the tendency to avoid voiced sibilant affricates. This tendency is explained by appealing to the phonetic properties of the sounds, and in particular to their aerodynamic characteristics. On the basis of experimental...
Article
Full-text available
Two hypotheses have been proposed in order to account for velar softening, i.e., a process through which // changes to an affricate. Whereas one hypothesis states that for the process to apply the velar stop has to be realized as an (alveolo)palatal stop (articulation-based hypothesis), the other claims that velar softening is triggered by acoustic...
Article
In this paper it is argued that several typologically unrelated languages share the tendency to avoid voiced sibilant affricates. This tendency is explained by appealing to the phonetic properties of the sounds, and in particular to their aerodynamic characteristics. On the basis of experimental evidence it is shown that conflicting air pressure re...
Article
Full-text available
ZASPiL 49.2008 contains 9 articles.
Article
Full-text available
This paper provides an explanation for a sound change affecting Polish and Russian (probably independently), by which palatalized palatoalveolars became retroflexes. We argue that the sound change was motivated by the needs of perceptual distinctiveness within a rich sibilant inventory, and provide an analysis within the framework of Dispersion The...
Chapter
Full-text available
This paper investigates the interaction between phonological (i.e. phonotactic) and morphological factors in Polish, on the basis of the data from a phonetic syllabification experiment. The morphological factors which determine the parsability of derivatives include, among others, the transparency of complex words, their relative frequency, and the...
Article
Full-text available
This paper presents the trill [r] not only from the articulatory point of view but especially from a perceptual perspective which is often neglected in the phonological literature. I show that [r] is a very prominent sound due to its acoustic and perceptual features, which in turn are responsible for the frequent occurrence of [r] in the phonemic i...
Article
Full-text available
This article examines the motivation for phonological stop assibilations, e.g. /t/ is realized as [ts], [s] or [t[integral operator]] before /i/, from the phonetic perspective. Hall & Hamann (2006) posit the following two implications: (a) Assibilation cannot be triggered by /i/ unless it is also triggered by by /j/, and (b) voiced stops cannot und...
Chapter
Full-text available
Article
The goal of this paper is two-fold. First, it revises the common assumption that the affricate <č> denotes /t͡ʃ/ for all Slavic languages. On the basis of experimental results it is shown that Slavic <č> stands for two sounds: /t͡ʃ/ as e.g. in Czech and /ʈʂ/ as in Polish. The second goal of the paper is to show that this difference is not accidenta...
Article
Full-text available
This article investigates the relevance of morphological complexity and semantic compositionality to phonetic syllabification of prefixed words in Polish. The discussion focuses on morphologically complex words which contain extrasyllabic consonants in the stem-initial position, e.g. oćmdlec 'to faint', zaćrdzewiec 'to rust'. Evidence is employed f...
Article
Full-text available
This paper evaluates trills [r] and their palatalized counterparts [rj] from the point of view of markedness. It is argued that despite the articulatory and aerodynamic complexity of [r]s, they are unmarked sounds in comparison to [r]s, especially due to perceptual features. A direct contribution of this paper to the markedness concept is that per...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper Polish sibilants are reanalyzed by taking into consideration phonetic and phonological arguments. The main goal of this study is to show that Polish fricatives /S/ and /Z/ are retroflex and not palato-alveolars, as commonly assumed.
Article
This article examines the motivation for phonological stop assibilations, e.g. /t/ is realized as [ts], [s] or [tʃ] before /i/, from the phonetic perspective. Hall & Hamann (2003) posit the following two implications: (a) Assibilation cannot be triggered by /i/ unless it is also triggered by /j/, and (b) Voiced stops cannot undergo assibilations un...
Article
This paper evaluates trills [r] and their palatalized counterparts [rj] from the point of view of markedness. It is argued that [r]s are unmarked sounds in comparison to [r]s which follows from the examination of the following parameters: (a) frequency of occurrence, (b) articulatory and aerodynamic characteristics, (c) perceptual features, (d) eme...
Chapter
Full-text available
In this article I reanalyze sibilant inventories of Slavic languages by taking into consideration acoustic, perceptual and phonological evidence. The main goal of the study is to show that perception is important factor which determines the shape of sibilant inventories. The improvement of perceptual contrast essentially contributes to creating new...