Mary Anne Prater

Teacher Education, Primary Education, Educational Technology

Ph.D.
18.97

Publications

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    ABSTRACT: In the general education classroom students with learning disabilities (LD) often need academic accommodations to be successful. These accommodations are typically selected and implemented by their general education teachers, not by the students themselves. High school students with LD were taught to recognize when an accommodation was needed, select the appropriate accommodation, request the accommodation, and then implement the accommodation in the general education classroom. To evaluate the effectiveness of the instruction, four students were observed in the general classroom.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2014 · Intervention in School and Clinic
  • B. Barnes · G.S. Gibb · B.Y. Ashbaker · M.A. Prater
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    ABSTRACT: This case study describes services for students with disabilities at Karuna Home in Bylakuppe, Karnataka, India, a residential facility established to address the needs of individuals whose parents are primarily Tibetan immigrants. Interview, observation, and document review data collected over three months were used to describe and explain sociocultural and educational aspects of the school. Findings indicate that service providers embrace Tibetan Buddhist beliefs about individual worth and charitable service that can benefit the children and their caregivers in this life and the next, and that karma and other factors play roles in disability. Areas of concern and needed professional development are described, including effective assessment of academic and behavioral needs, improved planning and instruction using data-based objectives, and reliable monitoring of student progress toward intended learning and behavioral outcomes. Study findings can inform others who endeavor to provide similar services to individuals with disabilities in small or unique populations.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2014
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    ABSTRACT: Researchers suggest that video-based interventions can provide increased opportunity for students with disabilities to acquire important academic and functional skills; however, little research exists regarding video-based interventions on the academic skills of students with autism and intellectual disability. We used a multiple-baseline-across-participants design to investigate the effects of video self-modeling (VSM) on the mathematics skill acquisition of adolescents with autism. Four adolescent male students viewed videos of themselves on an iPad solving mathematical problems to estimate the amount of money used to pay for a given item and the amount to receive in change. Findings support a functional relationship between VSM and performance on math skills for each participant. Subsequently, the VSM was systematically faded during maintenance sessions, with little deterioration of skill. Follow-up data probes were interpreted to conclude that student characteristics may affect retention of skill. Implications for practice and research are discussed.
    Full-text · Article · May 2013 · Focus on Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities
  • Melissa Heath · Tina T Dyches · Mary Anne Prater
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    ABSTRACT: The book's content and the included lesson plans are specifically designed to supplement school-wide efforts to reduce and eliminate bullying. The lesson plans enable students to understand the importance of environments where everyone feels welcomed, valued, and respected. Supplemented by creative illustrations and summarized tables of key information, the book will be helpful to community and school librarians, elementary school teachers, and paraprofessionals serving pre-K through 4th grade students. Additionally, school-based mental health professionals such as school counselors, psychologists, and social workers can utilize the book's resources to teach social skills in classrooms and group counseling sessions.
    No preview · Book · Jan 2013
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    ABSTRACT: Research suggests a compelling correlation between teacher behavior and effective learning environments. Focusing on the evidence-based teaching skill of offering behavior-specific praise (BSP), the researchers worked with three elementary-level general educators in a tiered model of training generally known as response to intervention (RtI). Although RtI commonly provides targeted instructional support to students, this study used the RtI framework to provide professional development instruction to teachers. The researchers also tracked the behavior of three students identified by the teachers as having behavioral difficulties, who became the focus of each teacher's BSP. Results showed increases in rates of BSP following the Tier 2 and Tier 3 interventions (video self-monitoring and peer coaching), but not following the Tier 1 intervention (school-wide in-service training). Averages for all three students' on-task behavior increased with increased teacher BSP.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2012 · Education and Treatment of Children
  • Mary Anne Prater · Nari Carter · Caryl Hitchcock · Peter Dowrick
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    ABSTRACT: Video self-modeling (VSM) has been used for decades to effectively improve individuals' behaviors and skills. The purpose of this review is to locate and analyze published studies that used VSM for typical school-based academic skills to determine the effect of VSM interventions on students' academic performance. Only eight studies were located that met the selection criteria. Based on the results of these 8 studies, VSM shows promise for improving academic performance, although the small number of studies limits our ability to draw strong conclusions about the efficacy of VSM across the school age span and across various academic skills. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2012 · Psychology in the Schools
  • Tina Taylor Dyches · Nari J. Carter · Mary Anne Prater
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    ABSTRACT: Communicating with Parents: A Guide to Effective Practice is an essential guidebook for the K-12 education professional. This book takes an in-depth look at communicating with families of students in elementary and secondary schools and is founded on the most current research and practice. Divided into five main sections, this guide presents evidence-based content and strategies related to: Developing Caring Relationships in Schools, Communicating with Families for Student Success, Communicating with Families throughout the School Year, Communicating with Families in Meetings, and Addressing Difficult Topics with Families. Additionally, a broad-based school population is covered with pertinent information for working with families of: general education students, students with disabilities, culturally/linguistically diverse students, students from low socioeconomic status, and students with unique gifts and talents. The evidence-based material is enhanced and illustrated with examples, graphics, and professional reproducible materials, and on every page, educators will be given the most research-based content, sound examples, practical applications, and ready-to-use resources. An indispensible guide for all K-12 general education teachers, special educators, related services personnel, and administrators for both pre-service and in-service training.
    No preview · Book · Jan 2011
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    ABSTRACT: Bullying, a serious issue in today’s schools, negatively impacts children. This article summarizes research and emphasizes the need for effective tools, such as bibliotherapy, to deter bullying. To assist professionals in selecting books for bibliotherapy, 38 bully-themed children’s K-3 picture books ranked 1- 4 by The Horn Book Guide (HBG) from January 1, 2004 through January 1, 2010 were analyzed. Comparisons were made between the selected books’ portrayals of bullying and aspects of bullying, and bully prevention described in research literature. Information was summarized, including the following details: (a) gender of bully and victim, (b) type of bullying, (c) location of bullying, (d) responses of bystanders and adults, and (e) resolution of bullying problems. Considering this descriptive information, professionals are advised to more selectively recommend books to fit the unique needs of students and encourage desired bullying resolution strategies.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2011
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    ABSTRACT: Newbery books represent quality literature that has a profound social-emotional impact on its readers, yet these books have not been systematically evaluated for their portrayal of characters with disabilities. Thirty-one Newbery Award and Honor books from 1975–2009 were identified and portrayed 41 main or supporting characters with disabilities. These books were evaluated using the Rating Scale for Quality Characterizations of Individuals with Disabilities in Children’s Literature. Results indicate the representation of Newbery characters with disabilities is not proportionate to the current U.S. population of students with disabilities. Further, racial representation portrayed in these books is not representative of the diverse students receiving special education services. Trend analyses indicate that overall the portrayal of characters with disabilities is increasingly positive. School personnel are encouraged to select appropriate books for their instructional or bibliotherapeutic purposes. Authors are encouraged to include dynamic, exemplary, and memorable characters who are representative of today’s school population of students with disabilities.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2010 · Education and Training in Autism and Developmental Disabilitites
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    ABSTRACT: Special education faculty members (n = 12) from a large Western university participated in a four-year professional development program centered on increasing their cultural responsiveness. During the fourth year the primary investigator interviewed faculty members regarding their perceptions and the impact of the program. Each interview was audiotaped, transcribed, and analyzed using the inductive analysis design for qualitative research (Hatch, 2002). Faculty expressed likes and dislikes of the program and provided suggestions for future professional development. Other results that emerged included that time was a barrier, that leaving campus facilitated learning, and that collaboration enhanced learning. Faculty reported that the professional development made them self-reflect, change practice and attitudes, adjust their perceptions of diverse students, and alter professional interactions. Faculty also expressed personal conflicts as a result of these activities.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2010 · Teacher Education and Special Education The Journal of the Teacher Education Division of the Council for Exceptional Children
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    Full-text · Article · Sep 2010
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    Full-text · Article · May 2010
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    ABSTRACT: Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a neurobiological condition affecting 1 of every 200 school-age children. OCD greatly affects students’ academic, behavioral, and social functioning, and it can lead to additional problem such as depression. To effectively collaborate with other individuals providing appropriate support to students with OCD, teachers need to understand this disorder, particularly its manifestations in school settings. This article addresses typical manifestations of OCD in school settings and provides general and specific accommodations for teachers to implement in their classrooms.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2010 · Intervention in School and Clinic
  • Tina Taylor Dyches · Mary Anne Prater

    No preview · Chapter · Jan 2010
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    Mary Anne Prater · Temma Harris Devereaux
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    ABSTRACT: Given that the numbers of culturally and/or linguistically diverse students being educated in U.S. public schools are growing immensely, teacher educators must take responsibility for preparing teacher candidates to work in today's diverse classrooms. This can be difficult, however, if teacher educators are not culturally responsive in their curricular content and pedagogy. Teacher educators could benefit from engaging in professional development in this area. In this article, we discuss the professional literature on culturally responsive higher education training. We focus on the intended outcomes of professional development, including faculty knowledge, skills, and dispositions, as well as activities to promote cultural responsiveness among teacher education faculty.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2009
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    Nari J. Carter · Mary Anne Prater · Aaron Jackson · Michelle Marchant
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    ABSTRACT: As schools emphasize accountability and academic progress for all students, professional collaboration is a critical aspect of planning accommodations and interventions that address the learning needs of diverse learners. To better understand collaborative processes, the authors investigated the nature of a collaborative planning experience for pairs of special and general education teachers. Teachers were taught the curriculum, rules, instruction, materials, and environment collaboration process (M. A. Prater, 2003) in which teachers compared the demands of the general education classroom with the strengths and limitations of the individual student. Results indicate that sharing common philosophies about educating students with disabilities is an important aspect of successful collaborative planning. Teachers who expressed common philosophies about educating students with disabilities completed the process together. The teachers who did not express similar philosophies completed the process separately.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2009 · Preventing School Failure
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    ABSTRACT: Stress and burnout contribute significantly to the shortages of school-based speech-language pathologists (SLPs). At the request of the Utah State Office of Education, the researchers measured the stress levels of 97 school-based SLPs using the Speech-Language Pathologist Stress Inventory. Results indicated that participants' emotional-fatigue manifestations, instructional limitations, biobehavioral manifestations, lack of professional supports, and total stress were significantly below that of the original national sample. However, of the 48 survey items, participants' responses indicated more stress in three specific areas, namely, caseload size, salary, and the use of prescription drugs. Caseload and salary have been identified in other studies as major sources of stress for SLPs. No significant differences in stress were identified with the type of school district (rural and urban), number of years' experience, or number of students served. Efforts to reduce stress levels of SLPs should be aimed at increasing supports, reducing caseloads, and increasing salaries.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2009 · Communication Disorders Quarterly
  • Caryl H. Hitchcock · Mary Anne Prater · Chuan Chang

    No preview · Article · Jan 2009
  • Mary Anne Prater · Lynn K. Wilder · Tina Taylor Dyches
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    ABSTRACT: Educational professionals agree that traditional preservice preparation has been inadequate in preparing educators to teach culturally and/or linguistically diverse students. Reasons for this lack of preparation are generally identified as an insufficient number of diverse teacher candidates and poor infusion of culturally competent practices across programs. Most universities and colleges have responded to these needs, but neglect the need to improve faculty members’ own cultural competence. We present the journey taken by one traditional special education teacher preparation program to increase the number of diverse candidates enrolled, infuse cultural diversity competence across the program, and improve faculty members’ sensitivity and appropriate responses toward cultural differences.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2008 · Teaching Education
  • Nari J. Carter · Mary Anne Prater · Tina Taylor Dyches
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    ABSTRACT: This book is designed to instruct preservice teachers about challenges students with mild/moderate disabilities face in learning classroom curriculum, and to help these teachers learn how to provide accommodations and adaptations that address students’ educational needs. The book is divided into four sections: Addressing Learning Problems, Accessing General Education Curriculum, Assessment, and Content Area Accommodations. Each section beings with a discussion of the topic and explains why students with disabilities experience difficulty learning, followed by several suggestions that address students’ specific learning difficulties.
    No preview · Book · Jan 2008

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