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Mary Josette Wabano

Mary Josette Wabano
Nahndahweh Tchigehgamig Wikwemikong Health Centre, Wikwemikong, Ontario, Canada

Masters of Human Kinetics

About

33
Publications
9,598
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373
Citations
Introduction
Since 1985, she has worked with Aboriginal youth to address self-esteem and building confidence. She understands the life challenges faced by FN youth which has helped her understand the potential they have in terms of striving to become successful young adults. She is the Health Services Director for the NTWHC where she strives to implement programs and services that foster holistic well-being. She works with local academic partners to meet the goals/needs of local community health plans.
Additional affiliations
November 2009 - present
Wikwemikong Health Centre, Wikwemikong, Ontario, Canada
Position
  • Health Services Director

Publications

Publications (33)
Article
The Outdoor Adventure Leadership Experience (OALE) is an outdoor health promotion initiative primarily designed for youth. This program was developed through community-based participatory research in a First Nations Community in northern Ontario: Wiikwemkoong Unceded Territory. It is a 9- or 10-day intensive program involving a wilderness canoe exp...
Article
Full-text available
BACKGROUND: The Aboriginal Children’s Health and Well-Being Measure (ACHWM©) was developed to enable Aboriginal health leaders to gather information on the health of children at a local community level. This paper aims to describe the typical health profiles of First Nation children, living on traditional territory, as a reference to assist in the...
Article
Full-text available
Background There is a paucity of controlled clinical trial data based on research with Indigenous peoples. A lack of data specific to Indigenous peoples means that new therapeutic methods, such as those involving electronic health (eHealth), will be extrapolated to these groups based on research with other populations. Rigorous, ethical research ca...
Preprint
BACKGROUND There is a paucity of controlled clinical trial data based on research with Indigenous peoples. A lack of data specific to Indigenous peoples means that new therapeutic methods, such as those involving electronic health (eHealth), will be extrapolated to these groups based on research with other populations. Rigorous, ethical research ca...
Article
Health solutions for Aboriginal children should be guided by their community and grounded in evidence. This manuscript presents a prospective cohort study protocol, designed by a community-university collaborative research team. The study’s goal is to determine whether community-based screening and triage lead to earlier identification of children’...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction: Aboriginal children in Canada experience significant disparities in health in comparison to their mainstream peers. As Aboriginal communities and agencies strive to improve health, it is important to measure the impact of new programs and services. Since many Aboriginal children live in rural and remote communities, it is important t...
Article
Full-text available
p> OBJECTIVES: The Aboriginal Children’s Health and Well-Being Measure© (ACHWM) was developed to assess health from the perspectives of Aboriginal children. The purpose of this paper is to document the screening process, embedded within the ACHWM, and assess its effectiveness. METHODS: The ACHWM was implemented in 2014/2015 with children 8 to 18 y...
Article
Full-text available
PurposeThe aim of this research was to evaluate the reliability of the Aboriginal Children’s Health and Well-Being Measure© (ACHWM). Methods Two cohorts of children from Wiikwemkoong Unceded Territory were recruited for this study. Each child completed the ACHWM independently on a computer tablet running a customized survey app. The data from the f...
Article
Background: Mobile-cellular subscriptions have increased steadily over the past decade. The accessibility of SMS messages over existing mobile networks is high and has almost universal availability even on older and unsophisticated mobile phones and in geographic settings where wireless coverage is weak. There is intensive exploration of this inex...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Aboriginal children experience challenges to their health and well-being, yet also have unique strengths. It has been difficult to accurately assess their health outcomes due to the lack of culturally relevant measures. The Aboriginal Children's Health and Well-Being Measure (ACHWM) was developed to address this gap. This paper describ...
Article
Full-text available
Background There are emerging opportunities to improve the health of Aboriginal children and youth. The Aboriginal Children’s Health and Well-being Measure (ACHWM) was developed to enable Aboriginal communities to obtain group-level data from the perspectives of their children 8 to 18 years of age. The survey was developed in collaboration with chi...
Chapter
Community-based participatory research (CBPR) and realist evaluation (RE) seem to be complimentary frameworks for Aboriginal health, and they appear to be useful approaches for adventure therapy. CBPR is a collaborative approach to program development and research that is gaining currency as an effective way to meet the needs of individual Aborigin...
Chapter
It is imperative that we improve the mental health of Aboriginal youth in Canada. From an Aboriginal worldview, mental health must be approached in concert with the promotion of spiritual, physical, and emotional health. This holistic approach is concordant with the processes implicit in programs using outdoor adventure and experiential education (...
Article
Full-text available
Indigenous voices are largely silent in the outdoor education and adventure therapy literature. The purpose of this research collaboration was to understand how a 10-day outdoor adventure leadership experience (OALE) may promote resilience and well-being for Indigenous youth through their participation in the program. The process was examined throu...
Article
Full-text available
Non-communicable chronic diseases are the leading causes of mortality globally, and nearly 80% of these deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). In high-income countries (HICs), inequitable distribution of resources affects poorer and otherwise disadvantaged groups including Aboriginal peoples. Cardiovascular mortality in high-inco...
Article
Full-text available
It is imperative that we improve the mental health of Aboriginal youth in Canada. From an Aboriginal worldview, mental health must be approached in concert with the promotion of spiritual, physical, and emotional health. This holistic approach is concordant with the processes implicit in programs using outdoor adventure and experiential education (...

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Projects

Projects (4)
Project
The Aboriginal Children`s Health and Well-being Measure (ACHWM) is a comprehensive measure of health and well-being developed to give children and youth (8 to 18 years of age) an opportunity to share their perspectives on their own health. The ACHWM is completed using a fun tablet-based format that efficiently engages hard to reach children and youth. It has been implemented with over 400 youth in 3 First Nations and 2 Aboriginal agencies. Youth have shared experiences with the tablets that they have not been able to share face-to-face. We are now sharing this assessment process with several new communities and evaluating the process. The results will help us understand how to scale up the sharing of this measure most effectively, and how to adapt it if necessary for new contexts.