Mary A. Jamieson

Mary A. Jamieson
Oakland University · Department of Biological Sciences

Ph.D., University of Colorado

About

25
Publications
4,481
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738
Citations

Publications

Publications (25)
Article
Full-text available
Habitat loss and degradation due to agricultural intensification and urbanization are key threats facing wild pollinators, especially bees. However, data on the distribution and abundance of most of the world's 20,000+ bee species is lacking, making it difficult to assess the effects of anthropogenic disturbance through time. Moreover, there are ge...
Article
Full-text available
A growing body of research indicates that cities can support diverse bee communities. However, urbanization may disproportionately benefit exotic bees, potentially to the detriment of native species. We examined the influence of urbanization on exotic and native bees using two datasets from Michigan, USA. We found that urbanization positively influ...
Article
Full-text available
Wild bees are important pollinators in many ecosystems threatened by anthropogenic disturbance. Urban development can reduce and degrade natural habitat for bees and other pollinators. However, some researchers suggest that cities could also provide refuge for bees, given that agricultural intensification may pose a greater risk. In this study, we...
Article
Full-text available
While many cities have embraced urban agriculture, research examining crop productivity in urban environments is limited. Little is known about how abiotic and biotic factors affecting productivity on urban farms compare with those in rural environments. In this study, we investigated environmental factors influencing strawberry (Fragaria x ananass...
Article
Full-text available
The floral microbiome is of significant relevance to plant reproduction and crop productivity. While plant genotype is key to floral microbiome assembly, whether and how genotypic variation in floral traits and plant-level mutualistic and antagonistic interactions at the rhizosphere and phyllosphere influence the microbiome in the anthosphere remai...
Article
Full-text available
Climate warming can influence interactions between plants and associated organisms by altering levels of plant secondary metabolites. In contrast to studies of elevated temperature on aboveground phytochemistry, the consequences of warming on root chemistry have received little attention. Herein, we investigated the effects of elevated temperature,...
Poster
Full-text available
This poster describes some preliminary data and our plan for an upcoming experiment in the Jamieson Lab at Oakland University. We are examining the effects of mycorrhizal associations and herbivory on strawberry plant physiology and volatile production.
Article
Climate change and insect outbreaks are key factors contributing to regional and global patterns of increased tree mortality. While links between these environmental stressors have been established, our understanding of the mechanisms by which elevated temperature may affect tree-insect interactions is limited. Using a forest warming mesocosm, we i...
Conference Paper
The U.S. Department of Energy projects that millions of acres of croplands will be converted to new bioenergy crops in coming years. Such shifts in crop production are expected to alter the agricultural landscape, potentially affecting organisms inhabiting these agroecosystems. In particular, there is growing concern about how bees will respond to...
Conference Paper
In recent decades, tree mortality has increased at regional and global scales, due to multiple environmental stressors, including climate warming and insect pests. While the links between these stressors and tree mortality is certain, our understanding of how future climate change may interact with insect pests to affect trees and forest health is...
Article
Full-text available
As the world’s climate warms, the phenologies of interacting organisms in seasonally cold environments may advance at differing rates, leading to alterations in phenological synchrony that can have important ecological consequences. For temperate and boreal species, the timing of early spring development plays a key role in plant–herbivore interact...
Conference Paper
Climate warming, drought, and insect outbreaks are key factors contributing to global patterns of increased tree mortality and forest dieback. Thus, there is a critical need to understand and predict how climate change will influence and interact with insect pests to reduce forest productivity. Our study investigates potential consequences of clima...
Article
Full-text available
Global environmental change alters the supply of multiple limiting resources that regulate plant primary and secondary metabolism. Through modifications in resource availability, acquisition, and allocation, global change is likely to influence plant chemical defenses, and consequently species interactions that are mediated by these compounds. Whil...
Article
Full-text available
Chemical defenses are thought to contribute to the invasion success and impacts of many introduced plants; however, for most of these species, little is known about these compounds and how they vary in natural environments. Plant allelochemical concentrations may be affected by a variety of abiotic and biotic factors, including soil nutrients and h...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding and predicting the impacts of anthropogenically-driven climate change on species interactions and ecosystem processes is a critical scientific and societal challenge. Climate change has important ecological consequences for species interactions that occur across multiple trophic levels. In this update, we broadly examine recent litera...
Article
Full-text available
Unlabelled: • Premise of the study: Human nitrogen (N) inputs to terrestrial ecosystems have greatly increased in recent years and may have important consequences for plant growth, reproduction, and defense. Although numerous studies have investigated the effects of nitrogen addition on plants, few have examined both above- and belowground respo...
Article
Full-text available
Plant performance is influenced by both top-down (e.g., herbivores) and bottom-up (e.g., soil nutrients) controls. Research investigating the collective effects of such factors may provide important insight into the success and management of invasive plants. Through a combination of observational and experimental field studies, we examined top-down...
Article
1. Nitrogen enrichment is an important driver of environmental change. In the present study, plant-mediated effects of increased nitrogen on a specialist herbivore, Calophasia lunula Hufnagel, which sequesters antirrhinoside, an iridoid glycoside produced by its host plants, were examined. 2. Caterpillars were reared on Linaria dalmatica plants gr...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Background/Question/Methods Soil nitrogen availability plays a key role in plant resource allocation to growth, reproduction, and defense. Human nitrogen inputs in terrestrial ecosystems have dramatically increased in recent years and these inputs may alter plant allocation patterns, plant defense, and plant-herbivore interactions. Although a num...
Article
Full-text available
The early phases of biological invasions are poorly understood. In particular, during the introduction, establishment, and possible lag phases, it is unclear to what extent evolution must take place for an introduced species to transition from established to expanding. In this study, we highlight three disparate data sources that can provide insigh...
Article
Full-text available
Invasive plant species can have significant ecological and economic impacts. Although numerous hypotheses highlight the importance of the chemical defenses of invasive plant species, the chemical ecology of many invasive plants has not yet been investigated. In this study, we provide the first quantitative investigation of variation in iridoid glyc...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Invasive plants pose a serious threat to native biodiversity and the ability of these species to invade a habitat may be facilitated by other anthropogenically-driven environmental change factors, in particular soil nitrogen enrichment. Numerous theoretical and empirical studies indicate that non-native plants are most l...

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