Mary Hägg

Mary Hägg
Landstinget Gävleborg · Otorhinolaryngology, Hudiksvall Hospital, Sweden

Associate Professor, PhD, specialized in the field of orofacial medicine DDS Speech & Swallowing Centre Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology, Hudiksvall Hospital, Sweden, Centre for Research & Development, Uppsala University/Region Gävleborg Sweden

About

23
Publications
25,291
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332
Citations
Additional affiliations
January 1990 - December 2015
Landstinget Gävleborg
Position
  • Area manager for Speech & Swallowing Center, ENT

Publications

Publications (23)
Chapter
There is a clear need for new advances in treating dysphagia; healthcare professionals currently have a restricted range of options to treat swallowing problems and related conditions. Usual treatments for dysphagia are based on compensatory measures which allow patients to live within the limitations of their condition. These measures do not addre...
Chapter
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Esophagitis is a debilitating disease often leading to more serious conditions. It is aggravated by refluxed stomach acids for which the usual treatment is PPI drugs that at best treat the symptoms, not the underlying cause of reflux. Surgical interventions address the root - Hiatal muscular incompetence - but are invasive and expensive. Both treat...
Article
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Background Oral and pharyngeal swallowing dysfunction are common complications in acute stroke patients. This primary aim of this study was to determine whether oral neuromuscular training improves swallowing function in participants with swallowing dysfunction after stroke. A secondary aim was to assess how well results of the timed water-swallow...
Preprint
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Background: Oral and pharyngeal swallowing dysfunction are common complications in acute stroke patients. This primary aim of this study was to determine whether oral neuromuscular training improves swallowing function in participants with swallowing dysfunction after stroke. A secondary aim was to assess how well results of the timed water-swallow...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction: Oral Pharyngeal Dysphagia (OPD) is a debilitating swallowing dysfunction that can lead to mortality through pneumonia, and severely impacts quality of life. Identifying the disease and tracking its rehabilitation is difficult when only expensive and scarce diagnostic tools are available. This study investigates three simple tests for...
Article
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Objectives: this prospective, cluster randomised, controlled trial investigated the effect of oral neuromuscular training among older people in intermediate care with impaired swallowing. Methods: older people (≥65 years) with swallowing dysfunction were cluster randomised according to care units for 5 weeks of neuromuscular training of the orof...
Article
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Background: Swallowing dysfunction and risk of undernutrition increase the risk of pneumonia, morbidity, and mortality. Short-term care is an unexplored care context, where many older people stay yearly. Aim: This cross-sectional study aimed to describe and analyze the relationship between swallowing dysfunction and risk of undernutrition among...
Article
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Background: Many physicians insist patients lose weight before their hiatal hernia (HH) condition and related symptoms including intermittent esophageal dysphagia (IED) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) can be treated, but it is not proven that body mass index (BMI) has an impact on exercise-based treatment of HH-related symptoms. Aims/Obj...
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Background: Extensive studies have shown that older people are negatively impacted by impaired eating and nutrition. The abilities to eat, enjoy food, and participate in social activities associated with meals are important aspects of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and recovery after illness. This project aims to (i) describe and analyze r...
Article
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Background: Extensive studies have shown that older people are negatively impacted by impaired eating and nutrition. The abilities to eat, enjoy food, and participate in social activities associated with meals are important aspects of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and recovery after illness. This project aims to (i) describe and analyze re...
Article
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Conclusion All patients with dysphagia after stroke have impaired postural control. IQoro® screen (IQS) training gives a significant and lasting improvement of postural control running parallel with significant improvement of oropharyngeal motor dysfunction (OPMD). Objectives The present investigation aimed at studying the frequency of impaired pos...
Chapter
Eating difficulties after stroke are common and comprise multiple and complex aspects, such as mealtime problems, problems with chewing and swallowing and lack of energy, difficulties maintaining upright posture, and visual, perceptual and attention deficits, as well as contextual factors related to eating as a social activity. Impaired swallowing...
Article
Full-text available
Misdirected swallowing can be triggered by esophageal retention and hiatal incompetence. The results show that oral IQoro(R) screen (IQS) training improves misdirected swallowing, hoarseness, cough, esophageal retention, and globus symptoms in patients with hiatal hernia. The present study investigated whether muscle training with an IQS influences...
Article
Full-text available
To examine whether muscle training with an oral IQoro(R) screen (IQS) improves esophageal dysphagia and reflux symptoms. A total of 43 adult patients (21 women and 22 men) were consecutively referred to a swallowing center for the treatment and investigation of long-lasting nonstenotic esophageal dysphagia. Hiatal hernia was confirmed by radiologic...
Article
Full-text available
Training with either a palatal plate (PP) or an oral IQoro(R) screen (IQS) in patients with longstanding facial dysfunction and dysphagia after stroke can significantly improve facial activity (FA) in all four facial quadrants as well as swallowing capacity (SC). Improvements remained at late follow-up. The training modalities did not significantly...
Article
Full-text available
Most patients with post-stroke dysphagia are also affected by facial dysfunction in all four facial quadrants. Intraoral stimulation can successfully treat post-stroke dysphagia, but its effect on post-stroke facial dysfunction remains unknown. This study aimed to investigate whether intraoral stimulation after stroke has simultaneous effects on fa...
Article
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This study aims to examine any motility disturbance in any quadrant of the face other than the quadrant innervated by the lower facial nerve contralateral to the cortical lesion after stroke. Thirty-one stroke-afflicted patients with subjective dysphagia, consecutively referred to a swallowing centre, were investigated with a facial activity test (...
Article
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Aim: This study aimed at evaluating (1) if the oral training effect on stroke related dysphagia differs between two different oral appliances, a palatal plate (PP) and an oral screen (OS), and (2) if the training effect remains at a late follow-up. Methods: We included patients with stroke-related dysphagia at two different time periods: the first...
Article
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In spite of no clinical signs of facial paresis, a pathological lip force (LF) will strongly influence swallowing capacity (SC). Stroke patients with impaired SC suffer a subclinical facial paresis. The results support earlier findings that LF training can be used to treat dysphagia. Lip muscle training with an oral screen can improve both LF and S...
Article
Full-text available
Training with an oral screen can improve lip force (LF) and swallowing capacity (SC) in stroke patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia, irrespective of the duration of pretreatment of dysphagia, and irrespective of the presence or absence of central facial paresis. It is more plausible that treatment results are attributable to sensory motor stimulat...
Article
Full-text available
A prefabricated oral screen has shown promising results as a muscle self-training device to improve the lip function of stroke patients affected by oropharyngeal dysphagia. However, a technique for the measurement of lip muscle force, whether in healthy individuals or in stroke patients, is lacking. The present study was designed to (1) test the in...
Article
Full-text available
Sensorimotor plasticity in stroke patients with dysphagia A methodological study on investigation and treatment Mary Hägg Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden Dissertation for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy (Faculty of Medicine), presented at Uppsala University and to be publicly exam...
Article
Full-text available
Dysphagia is a common poststroke symptom with negative effects on recovery and rehabilitation. However, the orofacial regulation therapy, developed by Castillo Morales, comprising body regulation and orofacial regulation in combination with a palatal plate application has shown promising results in stroke patients. This therapy is based not only on...