Martine Lizotte

Martine Lizotte
Laval University | ULAVAL · Department of Biology

PhD in Oceanography
ArcticNet Training and Knowledge Mobilization Coordinator

About

67
Publications
13,149
Reads
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Citations
Introduction
Martine Lizotte works on the dynamics of marine sulfur cycling with a specific focus on the climate-cooling gas dimethylsulfide (DMS) and its metabolic precursor dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP). Biogeochemical cycling and ocean-atmosphere exchanges of climate-relevant gases and their variability within a changing climate are the key drivers of ongoing scientific objectives and investigations Dr Lizotte is involved in. Fundamental questions related to processes such as ocean acidification (especially in pH-sensitive regions such as the Arctic Ocean) and modifications in the supply of the essential micronutrient iron to oceanic regions along with their impact on plankton communities and the production of DMS are explored through active participation in national and international programs.
Additional affiliations
January 2010 - present
Laval University
Position
  • Research Associate

Publications

Publications (67)
Preprint
Full-text available
Climate warming and related drivers of soil thermal change in the Arctic are expected to modify the distribution and dynamics of carbon contained in perennially frozen grounds. Thawing of permafrost in the Mackenzie Delta region of northwestern Canada, coupled with increases in river discharge and coastal erosion, trigger the release of terrestrial...
Presentation
Full-text available
Biogenic sources of sulfur are important precursors of aerosols in the Arctic during the summer months. Recent studies show that peaks in ultrafine particle formation events often coincide with hotspots of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) emissions from the marginal ice zone. During the last 10 years, we explored the diversity of DMS sources associated with...
Preprint
The Green Edge project was designed to investigate the onset, life and fate of a phytoplankton spring bloom (PSB) in the Arctic Ocean. The lengthening of the ice-free period and the warming of seawater, amongst other factors, have induced major changes in arctic ocean biology over the last decades. Because the PSB is at the base of the Arctic Ocean...
Data
Bottles or small containers/Aquaria (<20 L); Brackish waters; Community composition and diversity; Entire community; Laboratory experiment; North Atlantic; Other metabolic rates; Pelagos; Primary production/Photosynthesis; Temperate
Article
Full-text available
Phytoplankton blooms in the Arctic marginal ice zone (MIZ) can be prolific dimethylsulfide (DMS) producers, thereby influencing regional aerosol formation and cloud radiative forcing. Here we describe the distribution of DMS and its precursor dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) across the Baffin Bay receding ice edge in early summer 2016. Overall, DM...
Article
Full-text available
The objective of this study was to assess experimentally the potential impact of anthropogenic pH perturbation (ApHP) on concentrations of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), as well as processes governing the microbial cycling of sulfur compounds. A summer planktonic community from surface waters of the Lower St. Lawrence...
Article
Full-text available
The objective of this study was to assess experimentally the potential impact of anthropogenic pH perturbation (ApHP) on concentrations of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), as well as processes governing the microbial cycling of sulfur compounds. A summer planktonic community from surface waters of the Lower St. Lawrence...
Article
Full-text available
Surface ocean biogeochemistry and photochemistry regulate ocean-atmosphere fluxes of trace gases critical for Earth's atmospheric chemistry and climate. The oceanic processes governing these fluxes are often sensitive to the changes in ocean pH (or pCO2) accompanying ocean acidification (OA), with potential for future climate feedbacks. Here, we re...
Article
Full-text available
Early-career scientists (ECSs) are a large part of the workforce in science. While they produce new scientific knowledge that they share in publications, they are rarely invited to participate in the peer-review process. Barriers to the participation of ECSs as peer reviewers include, among other things, their lack of visibility to editors, inexper...
Article
Full-text available
Arctic sea ice is retreating and thinning and its rate of decline has steepened in the last decades. While phytoplankton blooms are known to seasonally propagate along the ice edge as it recedes from spring to summer, the substitution of thick multiyear ice (MYI) with thinner, ponded first-year ice (FYI) represents an unequal exchange when consider...
Poster
In our collective endeavour towards global sustainability, there is now a broad appreciation that producing scientifically robust knowledge requires new forms of engagement between scientists, stakeholders and society. But what is the role of Early Career Scientists (ECS) in these processes that are closing the gap between science and policy? Becau...
Article
Full-text available
Atmospheric dimethyl sulfide, DMS(g), is a climatically important sulfur compound and is the main source of biogenic sulfate aerosol in the Arctic atmosphere. DMS(g) production and emission to the atmosphere increase during the summer due to the greater ice-free sea surface and higher biological activity. We implemented DMS(g) in the Environment an...
Preprint
Full-text available
Arctic sea ice is retreating, thinning and its rate of decline has steepened in the last decades. While phytoplankton blooms are known to seasonally propagate along the ice edge as it recedes from spring to summer, the substitution of thick multi-year ice (MYI) with thinner, ponded first-year ice (FYI) represents an unequal exchange when considerin...
Preprint
Full-text available
Early Career Scientists (ECS) are a large part of the work force in science. While they produce new scientific knowledge that they share in publications, they are rarely invited to participate in the peer-review process. Barriers to the participation of ECS as peer-reviewers include, among others, their lack of visibility to editors, inexperience i...
Article
Full-text available
This paper presents the first empirical estimates of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) gas fluxes across permeable sea ice in the Arctic. DMS is known to act as a major potential source of aerosols that strongly influence the Earth’s radiative balance in remote marine regions during the ice-free season. Results from a sampling campaign, undertaken in 2015 bet...
Article
Full-text available
Atmospheric dimethyl sulfide, DMS(g), is a climatically important sulfur compound and is the main source of biogenic sulfate aerosol in the Arctic atmosphere. DMS(g) production and emission to the atmosphere increase during the summer due to greater ice-free sea surface and higher biological activity. We implemented DMS(g) in the GEM-MACH model (GE...
Article
Full-text available
The effects of ocean acidification and warming on the concentrations of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) and dimethylsulfide (DMS) were investigated during a mesocosm experiment in the Lower St. Lawrence Estuary (LSLE) in the fall of 2014. Twelve mesocosms covering a range of pHT (pH on the total hydrogen ion concentration scale) from 8.0 to 7.2,...
Article
Full-text available
Motivated by the need to predict how the Arctic atmosphere will change in a warming world, this article summarizes recent advances made by the research consortium NETCARE (Network on Climate and Aerosols: Addressing Key Uncertainties in Remote Canadian Environments) that contribute to our fundamental understanding of Arctic aerosol particles as the...
Poster
Poster presented at : - 14e ArcticNet annual scientific meeting - YOPP Arctic Science Workshop References : Casado, M., Gremion G., Rosenbaum, P.*, Caccavo, J.A., Aho, K., Champollion, N., Connors, S., Dahood A., Fernández A., Lizotte, M., Mintenbeck, K., Poloczanska, E., Fugmann G., (2019) – Giving a voice to Early Carrer Scientists through p...
Poster
Full-text available
In our collective endeavour towards global sustainability, there is now a broad appreciation that producing scientifically robust knowledge requires new forms of engagement between scientists, stakeholders and the society. But what is the role of Early Career Scientists (ECS) in these processes that help bridge the gap between science and policy? B...
Article
Full-text available
Motivated by the need to predict how the Arctic atmosphere will change in a warming world, this article summarizes recent advances made by the research consortium NETCARE (Network on Climate and Aerosols: Addressing Key Uncertainties in Remote Canadian Environments) that contribute to our fundamental understanding of Arctic aerosol particles as the...
Article
Full-text available
The effects of ocean acidification and warming on the concentrations of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) and dimethylsulfide (DMS) were investigated during a mesocosm experiment in the Lower St. Lawrence Estuary (LSLE) in the fall of 2014. Twelve mesocosms covering a range of pHT (pH on the total hydrogen ion concentration scale) from 8.0 to 7.2,...
Article
Correspondence in Nature. Full list of co-signatories: https://goo.gl/RoqD96
Article
Full-text available
We investigated the combined effect of ocean acidification and warming on the dynamics of the phytoplankton fall bloom in the Lower St. Lawrence Estuary (LSLE), Canada. Twelve 2600L mesocosms were set to initially cover a wide range of pHT (pH on the total proton scale) from 8.0 to 7.2 corresponding to a range of pCO2 from 440 to 2900µatm, and two...
Article
Full-text available
Melt pond formation is a seasonal pan-Arctic process. During the thawing season, melt ponds may cover up to 90 % of the Arctic first-year sea ice (FYI) and 15 to 25 % of the multi-year sea ice (MYI). These pools of water lying at the surface of the sea ice cover are habitats for microorganisms and represent a potential source of the biogenic gas di...
Article
Full-text available
We investigated the combined effect of ocean acidification and warming on the dynamics of the phytoplankton fall bloom in the Lower St. Lawrence Estuary (LSLE), Canada. Twelve 2600 L mesocosms were set to initially cover a wide range of pHT (pH on the total proton scale) from 8.0 to 7.2 corresponding to a range of pCO2 from 440 to 2900 µatm, and tw...
Article
Full-text available
Motivated by the need to predict how the Arctic atmosphere will change in a warming world, this article summarizes recent advances made by the research consortium NETCARE (Network on Climate and Aerosols: Addressing Key Uncertainties in Remote Canadian Environments) that contribute to our fundamental understanding of Arctic aerosol particles as the...
Data
Brackish waters; Entire community; Growth/Morphology; Laboratory experiment; Mesocosm or benthocosm; North Atlantic; Other metabolic rates; Pelagos; Primary production/Photosynthesis; Temperate; Temperature
Article
Full-text available
The oceanic frontal region above the Chatham Rise east of New Zealand was investigated during the late austral summer season in February and March 2012. Despite its potential importance as a source of marine-originating and climate-relevant compounds, such as dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and its algal precursor dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), little i...
Article
Full-text available
Melt pond formation is a natural seasonal pan-Arctic process. During the thawing season, melt ponds may cover up to 90 % of the Arctic first year sea ice (FYI) and 15 to 25 % of the multi-year sea ice (MYI). These pools of water lying at the surface of the sea-ice cover are habitats for microorganisms and represent a potential source of the biogeni...
Article
Full-text available
Establishing the relationship between marine boundary layer (MBL) aerosols and surface water biogeochemistry is required to understand aerosol and cloud production processes over the remote ocean and represent them more accurately in earth system models and global climate projections. This was addressed by the SOAP (Surface Ocean Aerosol Production...
Article
Full-text available
The source strength and capability of aerosol particles in the Arctic to act as cloud condensation nuclei have important implications for understanding the indirect aerosol–cloud effect within the polar climate system. It has been shown in several Arctic regions that ultrafine particle (UFP) formation and growth is a key contributor to aerosol numb...
Article
Full-text available
The sea-surface microlayer and bulk seawater can contain ice-nucleating particles (INPs) and these INPs can be emitted into the atmosphere. Our current understanding of the properties, concentrations, and spatial and temporal distributions of INPs in the microlayer and bulk seawater is limited. In this study we investigate the concentrations and pr...
Article
Full-text available
We present seawater concentrations of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) measured across a transect from the Labrador Sea to the Canadian Arctic Archipelago during summer 2015. Using an automated ship-board gas chromatography system and a membrane-inlet mass spectrometer, we measured a wide range of DMS (∼ 1 to 18 nM) and...
Article
Full-text available
Sea ice represents an additional oceanic source of the climatically active gas dimethyl sulfide (DMS) for the Arctic atmosphere. To what extent this source contributes to the dynamics of summertime Arctic clouds is, however, not known due to scarcity of field measurements. In this study, we developed a coupled sea ice–ocean ecosystem–sulfur cycle m...
Article
Full-text available
Establishing the relationship between marine boundary layer (MBL) aerosols and surface water biogeochemistry over the remote ocean is required to understand aerosol and cloud production processes, and also represent them accurately in Earth System Models and global climate projections. This was addressed in the SOAP (Surface Ocean Aerosol Productio...
Article
Full-text available
The oceanic frontal region above the Chatham Rise east of New Zealand was investigated during the late austral summer season in February and March 2012. Despite its potential importance as a source of marine-originating and climate-relevant compounds, such as dimethylsulfide (DMS) and its algal precursor dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), little is...
Article
Full-text available
In an experimental assessment of the potential impact of Arctic Ocean acidification on seasonal phytoplankton blooms and associated dimethyl sulfide (DMS) dynamics, we incubated water from Baffin Bay under conditions representing an acidified Arctic Ocean. Using two light regimes simulating under-ice or subsurface chlorophyll maxima (low light; low...
Article
Full-text available
The sea-surface microlayer and bulk seawater can contain ice-nucleating particles (INPs) and these INPs can be emitted into the atmosphere. Our current understanding of the properties, concentrations, spatial and temporal distributions of INPs in the microlayer and bulk seawater is limited. In this study we investigate the concentrations and proper...
Data
Arctic; Arctic; Bottles or small containers/Aquaria (<20 L); Community composition and diversity; Entire community; Laboratory experiment; Light; Open ocean; Other metabolic rates; Pelagos; Polar
Article
Full-text available
In an experimental assessment of the potential impact of Arctic Ocean acidification on seasonal phytoplankton blooms and associated dimethylsulfide (DMS) dynamics, we incubated water from Baffin Bay under conditions representing an acidified Arctic Ocean. Using two light regimes simulating under-ice/ subsurface chlorophyll maxima (low light; Low PA...
Article
Full-text available
Sea ice represents an additional oceanic source of the climatically active gas dimethylsulfide (DMS) for the Arctic atmosphere. To what extent this source contributes to the dynamics of summertime Arctic clouds is however not known due to scarcity of field measurements. In this study, we developed a coupled sea ice-ocean ecosystem-sulfur cycle mode...
Article
Full-text available
Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) plays a major role in the global sulfur cycle. In addition, its atmospheric oxidation products contribute to the formation and growth of atmospheric aerosol particles, thereby influencing cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) populations and thus cloud formation. The pristine summertime Arctic atmosphere is strongly influenced by D...
Article
Full-text available
Ocean acidification (OA) is likely to have an effect on the fertilizing potential of desert dust in high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll oceanic regions, either by modifying iron (Fe) speciation and bioavailability or by altering phytoplankton Fe requirements and acquisition. To address this issue, short incubations (4 days) of northeast subarctic Pacifi...
Article
Full-text available
Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) plays a major role in the global sulfur cycle. In addition, its atmospheric oxidation products contribute to the formation and growth of atmospheric aerosol particles, thereby influencing cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) populations and thus cloud formation. The pristine summertime Arctic atmosphere is a CCN-limited regime, an...
Article
Full-text available
Ocean acidification (OA) is likely to have an effect on the fertilizing potential of desert dust in high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll oceanic regions, either by modifying Fe speciation and bioavailability, or by altering phytoplankton Fe requirements and acquisition. To address this issue, short incubations (4 days) of northeast subarctic Pacific wate...
Article
Full-text available
This study reports on the temporal variations in algal and bacterial metabolism of dissolved dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSPd) in Arctic ice-covered waters in response to the release of organic matter (OM) from the sea ice and the onset of under-ice phytoplankton growth. Sampling took place between 21 May and 21 June 2012 at a station located in R...
Article
Full-text available
[1] This study presents temporal variations in concentrations of chlorophyll a (Chl a), particulate and dissolved dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSPp and DMSPd) in the sea ice and underlying water column in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago during the spring of 2010 and 2011. During both years, bottom-ice Chl a, DMSPp and DMSPd concentrations were high...
Article
Fe-poor water collected at Sta. P20 in the Gulf of Alaska in June 2011 was enriched with different concentrations of volcanic ash (0.12, 1.2, and 10 mg L−1) from two subduction zone volcanoes, Kasatochi and Chaiten, and incubated onboard under in situ conditions for 6 d. The experimental setup also included a control (no addition) and a positive co...
Article
Full-text available
Natural marine microbial communities sourced from under fast ice at an Antarctic coastal site were incubated in tanks under differently attenuated natural sunlight for 2 wk in late spring (Expt 1) and early summer (Expt 2). In the 18 d period between the 2 sampling episodes, the ice edge retreated from 10 to within 1.5 km of the sampling site, and...
Article
Full-text available
The influence of the seasonal development of microplankton communities on the cycling of dimethylsulfide (DMS) and its precursor dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) was investigated along a South-North gradient (36-59 °N) in the Northwest (NW) Atlantic Ocean. Three surveys allowed the sampling of surface mixed layer (SML) waters at stations extending...