Martina Sassone Corsi

Martina Sassone Corsi
Harvard Medical School | HMS · Department of Microbiology and Immunobiology

Doctor of Philosophy

About

16
Publications
5,408
Reads
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820
Citations
Additional affiliations
September 2016 - September 2017
University of California, Irvine
Position
  • Research Assistant
Education
September 2009 - March 2011
University of Rome Tor Vergata
Field of study
  • Molecular and Cellular Biology

Publications

Publications (16)
Article
The pathogen Salmonella enterica is a leading cause of infection worldwide. Nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) serovars typically cause inflammatory diarrhea in healthy individuals, and can cause bacteremia in immunocompromised patients, children, and the elderly. Management of NTS infection poses a challenge because antibiotic treatment prolongs fecal...
Article
Enteric Gram-negative bacteria, including Escherichia coli, biosynthesize and deploy the triscatecholate siderophore enterobactin (Ent) in the vertebrate host to acquire iron, an essential nutrient. We report that Ent–Cipro, a synthetic siderophore–antibiotic conjugate based on the native Ent platform that harbors an alkyl linker at one of the cate...
Article
Infections with Gram-negative pathogens pose a serious threat to public health. This scenario is exacerbated by increases in antibiotic resistance and the limited availability of vaccines and therapeutic tools to combat these infections. Here, we report an immunization approach that targets siderophores, which are small molecules exported by enteri...
Article
The Enterobacteriaceae are Gram-negative bacteria and include commensal organisms as well as primary and opportunistic pathogens that are among the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although Enterobacteriaceae often comprise less than 1% of a healthy intestine's microbiota(1), some of these organisms can bloom in the inflamed gut...
Article
Bacteria of the phylum Bacteroidetes constitute a substantial portion of the human gut microbiota, including symbionts and opportunistic pathogens. How these bacteria coexist and provide colonization resistance to pathogenic strains is not well understood. In this issue of EMBO Reports, Hecht and colleagues describe a mechanism by which strains of...
Article
Full-text available
The mammalian intestine harbors a community of trillions of microbes, collectively known as the gut microbiota, which coevolved with the host in a mutually beneficial relationship. Among the numerous gut microbial species, certain commensal bacteria are known to provide health benefits to the host when administered in adequate amounts and, as such,...
Article
Although the microbiota protects the host from infection, pathogens are still able to colonize and cause disease. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Maier et al. (2013) provide mechanistic insight into the initial stages of Salmonella growth in the gut, showing that microbiota-derived hydrogen provides an energy boost to Salmonella.
Article
Full-text available
Probiotics are beneficial components of the microbiota that have been used for centuries because of the health benefits they confer to the host. Only recently, however, has the contribution of probiotics to modulation of immunological, respiratory, and gastrointestinal functions started to be fully appreciated and scientifically evaluated. Probioti...

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