Martina Radić

Martina Radić
Universität Bern | UniBe · Department for BioMedical Research

PhD
Postdoctoral Researcher

About

10
Publications
627
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
33
Citations

Publications

Publications (10)
Article
Full-text available
Regardless of the significant improvements in treatment of melanoma, the majority of patients develop resistance whose mechanisms are still not completely understood. Hence, we generated and characterized two melanoma-derived cell lines, primary WM793B and metastatic A375M, with acquired resistance to the RAF inhibitor vemurafenib. The morphology o...
Article
Full-text available
Background NME6 is a member of the nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDPK/NME/Nm23) family which has key roles in nucleotide homeostasis, signal transduction, membrane remodeling and metastasis suppression. The well-studied NME1-NME4 proteins are hexameric and catalyze, via a phospho-histidine intermediate, the transfer of the terminal phosphate from...
Article
Full-text available
Cutaneous melanoma is the most aggressive form of skin cancer. Despite the significant advances in the management of melanoma in recent decades, it still represents a challenge for clinicians. The TP53 gene, the guardian of the genome, which is altered in more than 50% of human cancers, is rarely mutated in melanoma. More recently, researchers star...
Article
Full-text available
Nucleoside diphosphate kinases (NDPK/NME/Nm23) are enzymes composed of subunits NME1/NDPK A and NME2/NDPK B, responsible for the maintenance of the cellular (d)NTP pool and involved in other cellular processes, such as metastasis suppression and DNA damage repair. Although eukaryotic NDPKs are active only as hexamers, it is unclear whether other NM...
Article
Full-text available
Unlike other tumours, TP53 is rarely mutated in melanoma; however, it fails to function as a tumour suppressor. We assume that its functions might be altered through interactions with several families of proteins, including p53/p73, NME and GLI. To elucidate the potential interplay among these families we analysed the expression profiles of aforeme...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Introduction Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), a potent signalling lipid. It mediates its actions by binding to a family of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), known as S1P receptors. It has been implicated in the several processes integral to carcinogenesis. S1P signalling promotes cancer by inhibiting apoptosis and by enhancing proliferation, trans...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Introduction TP53 is the most frequently mutated gene in human cancer. However, in metastatic melanoma mutations of TP53 occur infrequently and p53 fails to function as a tumour suppressor. The altered expression of p53 family members, including p53/p73 isoforms, as well as of the interactions among them could affect normal function of p53. Further...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Introduction Malignant melanoma is the most aggressive form of skin cancer and resistant to available therapies, therefore new molecular approaches for better understanding of disease are needed. Although TP53 is rarely mutated in melanoma, it fails to function as a tumour suppressor. This may result from alterations in p53 family members, includin...
Article
Liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry is routinely used in proteomics research. Mass spectrometry-based peptide analysis is de facto performed in positive ion mode, except for the analysis of some post-translationally modified peptides (e.g. phosphorylation and glycosylation). Collected mass spectrometry data af...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
I'm doing research on protein (A and B isoform) that form enzymatically active hexameric complex. These hexamers are represented in all combinations (A6, A5B,..., B6). I would like to find out if they are all equally represented in my cell line or some hexamers are preferred? I can do immunoprecipitation and after that I tried native electrophoresis (without SDS) and western blot, but didn't get any results. Do you have any idea what should I do after ip in order to separate and distinguish these hexamers?

Network

Cited By