Martin Warren

Martin Warren
Butterfly Conservation Europe

Doctor of Philosophy

About

108
Publications
68,186
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10,600
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Additional affiliations
October 1976 - May 1980
University of Cambridge
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (108)
Article
Full-text available
We review changes in the status of butterflies in Europe, focusing on long-running population data available for the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, and Belgium, based on standardized monitoring transects. In the United Kingdom, 8% of resident species have become extinct, and since 1976 overall numbers declined by around 50%. In the Netherlands, 2...
Technical Report
Full-text available
In this report, we update the European Grassland Butterfly Indicator, present new butterfly indicators for widespread species, woodland butterflies, as well as butterflies in urban environments, in Natura 2000 areas and as climate change indicators. The indicators use field data up to and including the 2018 field season. The method for calculating...
Article
Full-text available
Red Lists are very valuable tools in nature conservation at global, continental and (sub-) national scales. In an attempt to prioritise conservation actions for European butterflies, we compiled a database with species lists and Red Lists of all European countries, including the Macaronesian archipelagos (Azores, Madeira and Canary Islands). In tot...
Article
Full-text available
We describe how a landscape-scale approach has been adopted to conserve the UK’s most threatened butterfly Argynnis adippe. Only 37 populations now remain, with 38 extinctions occurring since 1994 (51% loss). The butterfly has disappeared from most of England and Wales and is now confined to just four landscapes. Since 2005 management in these land...
Book
Full-text available
Aim The Mediterranean Red List assessment is a review of the conservation status at regional level of approximately 6,000 species (amphibians, mammals, reptiles, fishes, butterflies, dragonflies, beetles, molluscs, corals and plants) according to the IUCN Red List Categories and Criteria. It identifies those species that are threatened with extinct...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This report presents the fifth version of the European Grassland Butterfly Indicator, one of the EU biodiversity indicators of the European Environment Agency. The indicator is based on national Butterfly Monitoring Schemes in 22 countries across Europe, most of them active in the European Union. Fluctuations in numbers between years are typical fe...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Identification of Prime Butterfly Areas (PBAs) is a conservation tool that can support other conservation network and secure species and habitat conservation. Examination of Meghri region of Armenia has identified seven PBAs with total area of 7875 ha. Most of those areas are covered by the National Park that is located in this region except the ar...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This report presents the European Grassland Butterfly Indicator, based on national Butterfly Monitoring Schemes (BMS) in 19 countries across Europe, most of them in the European Union. The indicator shows that since 1990 till 2011 butterfly populations have declined by almost 50 %, indicating a dramatic loss of grassland biodiversity. This also mea...
Article
Full-text available
The Macedonian Grayling is listed as critically endangered in the recent IUCN Red List of European butterflies because of its extreme rarity and habitat loss due to quarrying. This categorisation was, however, based on rather limited knowledge on its actual distribution, popu-lation size and habitat requirements. In 2012, we conducted field surveys...
Book
Full-text available
Monitoring butterfly populations is an important means of measuring change in the environment as well as the state of habitats for biodiversity. It is also a useful way that both professional ecologists and volunteers can contribute to the conservation of butterflies and biodiversity. This manual describes how to set up butterfly monitoring, do the...
Book
Full-text available
El seguimiento de poblaciones de mariposas es una importante herramienta para medir los cambios en el medio ambiente así como para conocer la capacidad de los hábitats para albergar biodiversidad. Es también una manera útil para que ecólogos profesionales y voluntarios puedan contribuir conjuntamente a la conservación de las mariposas y de la biodi...
Book
Full-text available
Monitorizarea populaţiilor de fluturi este un mijloc important de măsurare a schimbărilor de mediu cât şi a stării habitatelor din punct de vedere al biodiversităţii. Este de asemenea o cale utilă cum ambii, ecologiştii profesionişti şi voluntarii, pot contribui la conservarea fluturilor şi a biodiversităţii. Acest manual descrie cum să fie concepu...
Article
Full-text available
There is an increased appreciation of the need for horizon scanning: the identification and assessment of issues that could be serious in the future but have currently attracted little attention. However, a process is lacking to identify appropriate responses by policy makers and practitioners. We thus suggest a process and trial its applicability....
Article
Full-text available
Twenty-nine butterfly species are listed on the Annexes of the Habitats Directive. To assist everyone who wants or needs to take action for one of these species, we compiled an overview of the habitat requirements and ecology of each species, as well as information on their conservation status in Europe. This was taken from the recent Red List and...
Chapter
Butterfly Conservation is a registered charity in the UK whose aim is to conserve butterflies, moths and their habitats. It currently (September 2010) has 15,000 members, over 55 staff, and 31 volunteer Branches throughout the UK. Although much of its work is based in the UK, it helped establish Butterfly Conservation Europe in 2004, to stimulate a...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Small Tortoiseshell numbers fell to unprecedented lows in the last few years. The recently arrived parasitoid Sturmia bella may be part of the problem but is not the sole factor driving the decline of this familiar and much-loved butterfly. Photograph Rachel Scopes 2 n The results show that the 2010 European Union target to halt the loss of biodive...
Article
1. Over the last century butterflies have undergone substantial changes in abundance and range in Great Britain and monitoring has improved markedly. These changes, together with a major revision of International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) criteria, render previous Red List assessments outdated. 2. A new Red List assessment of all 62 r...
Article
Full-text available
Butterflies and moths have undergone a serious decline in most European countries following rapid changes in land use in recent decades. The main drivers of loss have been agricultural and forestry intensification, abandonment of marginal land (especially in mountainous regions), loss of traditional management of grasslands and woodlands, and urban...
Article
Butterfly Conservation, in partnership with the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology and Dublin Naturalists’ Field Club, has been coordinating the collation of detailed geographical records of butterfly sightings across Britain and Ireland, mainly made by volunteers, for a continuous period of 15years since 1995. This has generated a dataset of over 7....
Article
Full-text available
The United Kingdom (UK) Government has national and international commitments to tackle the rate of biodiversity loss by 2010. Biodiversity indicators are used to measure and communicate progress in meeting these commitments. From 2005 onwards, butterflies have been adopted as Governmental biodiversity indicators in England, Scotland and for the UK...
Article
The IUCN is the leading authority on assessing species’ extinction risks worldwide and introduced the use of quantitative criteria for the compilation of Red Lists of threatened species. Recently, we assessed the threat status of the 483 European butterfly species, using semi-quantitative data on changes in distribution and in population sizes prov...
Chapter
Summary Moths are a diverse group of insects (around 2500 species in Britain and Ireland) that make a significant contribution to our biodiversity. Despite being a species-rich group, the popularity of moth recording has made it feasible to assess rates of species colonisation and local extinction, conservation status and, for hundreds of macro-mot...
Article
Full-text available
In the „Climatic Risk Atlas of European Butterflies” by Settele et al. (2008) some errors occurred for which we apologize and herewith present the corrections.
Chapter
Full-text available
The status of butterflies in Europe was published by the Council of Europe in 1999. The methods and criteria used in the Red Data Book are presented and the status of the 576 species of butterfly known to occur in Europe is assessed. For almost all of the 19 endemic species, a decline in distribution has been apparent for the last 25 years, making...
Chapter
Full-text available
The overarching aim of the atlas is to communicate the potential risks of climatic change to the future of European butterflies. The main objectives are to: (1) provide a visual aid to discussions on climate change risks and impacts on biodiversity and thus contribute to risk communication as a core element of risk assessment; (2) present crucial d...
Article
The Chalkhill Blue Polyommatus coridon is a widespread butterfly of lowland calcareous grassland in southern Britain and is considered a good indicator of habitat condition. Polyommatus coridon has been identified as a Species of Conservation Concern in the UK Biodiversity Action Plan due to a greater than 25% decline in range size since the 1950s,...
Article
A key question facing conservation biologists is whether declines in species' distributions are keeping pace with landscape change, or whether current distributions overestimate probabilities of future persistence. We use metapopulations of the marsh fritillary butterfly Euphydryas aurinia in the United Kingdom as a model system to test for extinct...
Article
Full-text available
These proceedings contain papers on insect conservation biology that are classified under 3 themes: (1) the current status of insect conservation, and major avenues for progress and hindrances (6 papers); (2) insects as model organisms in conservation biology (6 papers); and (3) future directions in insect conservation biology (6 papers).
Technical Report
Full-text available
Butterflies are beautiful, emblematic creatures that enrich our quality of life. They fulfil a vital role as flagship species; engaging the public, local communities and the media in biodiversity conservation and sustainable development issues. Butterflies can also act as indicators in this time of rapid, perhaps unprecedented, environmental change...
Article
Full-text available
A fundamental problem in estimating biodiversity loss is that very little quantitative data are available for insects, which comprise more than two-thirds of terrestrial species. We present national population trends for a species-rich and ecologically diverse insect group: widespread and common macro-moths in Britain. Two-thirds of the 337 species...
Article
Full-text available
The Red Data Book of European Butterflies, published in 1999, showed that butterflies have declined seriously across Europe and that 71 of the 576 species are threatened (12% of the total) either because of their extreme rarity or rapid decline. Many more species were shown to be declining in substantial parts of their range. A follow up project wa...
Article
Full-text available
Europe has undergone substantial biotope loss and change over the last century and data are needed urgently on the rate of decline in different wildlife groups in order to identify and target conservation measures. However, pan-European data are available for very few taxonomic groups, notably birds. We present here the first overview of trends for...
Article
Full-text available
The Rothamsted Insect Survey has operated a Great Britain-wide network of light-traps since 1968. From these data we estimated the first ever national abundance indices and 35-year population trends for 338 species of common macro-moths. Although the number of trap sites which run each year is not constant, there is a representative, well-distribut...
Article
Full-text available
Habitat degradation and climate change are thought to be altering the distributions and abundances of animals and plants throughout the world, but their combined impacts have not been assessed for any species assemblage. Here we evaluated changes in the distribution sizes and abundances of 46 species of butterflies that approach their northern clim...
Article
Full-text available
Deer grazing is an important feature of many key butterfly habitats in Britain, yet few data are available on its impacts. Butterfly populations can be affected in a number of ways, through effects on the local availability of larval food‐plants or nectar sources, to larger‐scale changes in habitat structure and management. Many woodl...
Article
Full-text available
The Red Data Book of European Butterflies provides a new up-to-date review to identify conservation priorities and a new Red List for the 576 butterfly species known to occur in Europe. The geographical scope is continent-wide, and covers all countries within the Council of Europe, including the Azores, Madeira, the Canary Islands, Russia east to t...
Research
Full-text available
Action plan describing ecology, status and conservation requirements of this species
Article
Geographical range size is a key ecological variable, but the consequences of measuring range size in di¡erent ways are poorly understood. We use high-resolution population data from British butter£ies to demonstrate that conventional distribution maps, widely used by conservation biologists, grossly overestimate the areas occupied by species and g...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Thymelicus acteon (Lulworth Skipper) and Lysandra bellargus (Adonis blue) are highly restricted species in the UK. The former is confined to unimproved calcicolous grassland on the south coast of Dorset where its larval food plant, Brachypodium pinnatum, grows in an ungrazed or lightly grazed turf over 10 cm high. Lysandra bellargus is restricted t...
Article
Full-text available
Geographical range size is a key ecological variable, but the consequences of measuring range size in different ways are poorly understood. We use high-resolution population data from British butterflies to demonstrate that conventional distribution maps, widely used by conservation biologists, grossly overestimate the areas occupied by species and...