Martin Mayer

Martin Mayer
Aarhus University | AU · Department of Bioscience

PhD

About

66
Publications
18,868
Reads
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433
Citations
Citations since 2016
58 Research Items
421 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022020406080100
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100
Introduction
Wildlife and conservation biologist broadly interested in behavioral and spatial ecology, invasive species, and host-parasite interactions of terrestrial vertebrates.

Publications

Publications (66)
Article
Full-text available
1.Territoriality is an important process shaping population dynamics, and the defense of a territory is crucial for individuals to increase the duration of territory occupancy and consequently, reproductive success. However, little is known about how the frequency of territory intrusions and subsequent territorial behaviors and aggression by territ...
Article
Full-text available
Amphibian skin secretions (substances produced by the amphibian plus microbiota) plausibly act as a first line of defense against parasite/pathogen attack, but may also provide chemical cues for pathogens. To clarify the role of skin secretions in host–parasite interactions, we conducted experiments using cane toads (Rhinella marina) and their lung...
Article
Full-text available
Attacks by large predators on livestock are an important driver of conflicts. Consequently, knowledge about where predators occur, where livestock depredation takes place and what factors influence it will aid the mitigation of stakeholder conflicts. Following legal protection, wolves (Canis lupus) in Central Europe are recently spreading to areas...
Article
Full-text available
Farmland biodiversity is declining at an alarming rate and various conservation measures have been implemented to reverse this negative trend. Farmsteads within agricultural landscapes were recently identified as farmland bird hotspots, so we ask whether the modernization of farmsteads has substantially reduced their conservation potential for farm...
Article
Full-text available
Context Roads are ubiquitous in human inhabited landscapes, and can impact animal movement and population dynamics, due to barrier effects, road mortality, but also by providing resources at road verges. Thus, we need a better understanding of how roads, in interaction with seasonal changes in habitat structure, affect space use and habitat selecti...
Article
Full-text available
Beavers can change habitat composition by cutting down trees, digging, and damming activities, thereby affecting species richness and abundance. Although there is large body of literature regarding the effects of beaver activity on a wide range of taxonomic groups, relatively little is known about how space use by ungulates is affected by beavers i...
Preprint
Full-text available
Beavers can change habitat composition by cutting down trees, digging, and damming activities, thereby affecting species richness and abundance. Although there is large body of literature regarding the effects of beaver activity on a wide range of taxonomic groups, relatively little is known about how space use by ungulates is affected by beavers i...
Article
Full-text available
Antipredator behaviors allow prey to mitigate the impacts of their predators. We investigated antipredator responses of two herbivore species, roe deer and European hare, and one mesopredator, red fox, toward predation risk imposed by lynx and wolf. We collected data (using camera traps) on visitation frequency and vigilance behavior to olfactory p...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract Coevolutionary host–parasite “arms races” can be disrupted by new evolutionary forces imposed by biological invasions, affecting both host and parasite densities, as well as their traits. The spread of cane toads (Rhinella marina) and their parasitic lungworm (Rhabdias pseudosphaerocephala) across tropical Australia provides an ideal oppor...
Thesis
Full-text available
Translocations, “the deliberate movement of organisms from one site for release in another”, are increasingly being used for wildlife conservation and management. However, their success rate is still relatively low. Failures of translocation projects have often been attributed to the extensive movements made by newly-released individuals or their i...
Article
Full-text available
Background Passive integrated transponder devices (PIT tags) are a valuable tool for individual identification of animals. Similarly, the surgical implantation of transmitters and bio-loggers can provide useful data on animal location, physiology and behavior. However, to avoid unnecessary recapture and related stress of study animals, PIT tags and...
Data
The zip-file ” Mammal responses to predator scents across multiple study areas_data, scripts and outputs.zip” contains raw data, scripts and outputs (with explanations) for the paper: P. Sunde, F. Böcker, G-R. Rauset, P. Kjellander, M. Chrenkova, T. M. Skovdal, S. van Beeck Calkoen, M. Mayer & M. Heurich (2022). Mammal responses to predator scents...
Preprint
Full-text available
Assessing the underlying mechanisms of co-occurrence patterns can be challenging as biotic and abiotic causations are hard to disentangle. To date, few studies have investigated co-occurrence patterns within urban areas that constitute novel habitat to numerous wildlife species. Moreover, as urban areas expand and are increasingly used as habitat b...
Preprint
Full-text available
ContextRoads are ubiquitous in human inhabited landscapes, and can impact animal movement and population dynamics, due to barrier effects, road mortality, but also by providing resources at road verges. Thus, we need a better understanding of how roads, in interaction with seasonal changes in habitat structure, affect space use and habitat selectio...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background Passive integrated transponder devices (PIT tags) are a valuable tool for individual identification of animals. Similarly, the surgical implantation of transmitters and bio-loggers can provide useful data on animal location, physiology and behavior. However, to avoid unnecessary recapture and related stress of study animals, PIT tags and...
Data
Attacks by large predators on livestock are an important driver of conflicts. Consequently, knowledge about where predators occur, where livestock depredation takes place and what factors influence it will aid the mitigation of stakeholder conflicts. Following legal protection, wolves (Canis lupus) in Central Europe are recently spreading to areas...
Article
Full-text available
Bio-logging is a common method to collect ecological data on wild animals, but might also induce stress, reduce body condition, and alter behavior. Eurasian beavers ( Castor fiber ) are a semi-aquatic and nocturnal species that are challenging to observe in the wild. Bio-loggers are hence useful tools to study their behaviour and movements, but thi...
Article
Full-text available
Advances in bio-logging technology for wildlife monitoring have expanded our ability to study space use and behavior of many animal species at increasingly detailed scales. However, such data can be challenging to analyze due to autocorrelation of GPS positions. As a case study, we investigated spatiotemporal movements and habitat selection in the...
Article
Full-text available
Capture and handling of wildlife is an important component of wildlife studies, and hunting can be a central tool for wildlife management. However, human-caused disturbance of animals can cause various negative effects on individuals. Thus, an increased understanding of different disturbances on animals will allow improved mitigation of human stres...
Article
Vehicles collide with hundreds of thousands of deer on European roads each year. This leads to animal deaths and suffering, economic damage and risks for human safety, making the reduction of road mortality a major field in conservation biology. In order to successfully reduce roadkill, we need improved knowledge regarding spatio-temporal patterns...
Technical Report
Full-text available
With less than 15 known remaining breeding pairs, the Little Owl Athene noctua is on the verge of extinction as a Danish breeding bird, due to inadequate juvenile production, caused by lack of natural food during the breeding season. This report presents results of a study to identify the requirements for maintaining a natural, self-supporting popu...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Det biologiske levegrundlag for kirkeugler i Danmark. In Danish with English Summary: Habitat and prey requirements for the Little Owl in Denmark, and Deutsche Zusammenfassung: Lebensraum- und Beuteanforderungen für den Steinkauz in Dänemark Sammendrag Med under 15 kendte, tilbageværende ynglepar er kirkeuglen på randen til at uddø som dansk yng...
Article
Full-text available
Eurasian beaver familiarity mate change mate choice pair replacement reproductive success territoriality Territory acquisition and pair compatibility are determining factors for the fitness of territorial animals. Although these aspects are often studied separately, for territorial monogamous species acquiring a territory and obtaining a mate are n...
Preprint
Amphibian skin secretions (substances produced by the amphibian plus microbiota) plausibly act as a first line of defense against pathogen attack, but may also provide chemical cues for pathogens. To clarify the role of skin secretions in host-parasite interactions, we conducted experiments using cane toads (Rhinella marina) and their lungworms (Rh...
Article
Full-text available
By perturbing co-evolved interactions, biological invasions provide an opportunity to study the evolution of interactions between hosts and their parasites on ecological timescales. We studied the interaction between the cane toad (Rhinella marina) and its direct-lifecycle lungworm (Rhabdias pseudosphaerocephala) that was brought from South America...
Article
Full-text available
In our paper, using distance sampling, we estimated the population density of hares in Aarhus city to 6.8 hares/km2.
Article
Full-text available
Intraspecific competition plays an important role for territory acquisition and occupancy, in turn affecting individual fitness. Thus, understanding the drivers of intraspecific aggression can increase our understanding of population dynamics. Here, we investigated intraspecific aggression in Eurasian (Castor fiber) and North American (Castor canad...
Article
Full-text available
Food storage (caching, hoarding), which is observed in many species of animals, increases food availability during times of food insecurity. Both species of beaver (Eurasian beaver, Castor fiber, and the North American beaver, C. canadensis) living at northern latitudes where food may be scarce during winter are larder-hoarders, constructing a food...
Article
Full-text available
Social interactions among individuals play a central role in behavioural ecology and studying cohesion of monogamous pairs is important to understand their social relationships. Here, we tested five hypotheses to investigate patterns of pair cohesion in an obligate monogamous mammal, the Eurasian beaver, Castor fiber. We hypothesized that pair cohe...
Article
Full-text available
Animal carcasses provide an ephemeral pulse of nutrients for scavengers that use them. Carcass sites can increase species interactions and/or ephemeral, localized landscapes of fear for prey within the vicinity. Few studies have applied the landscape of fear to carcasses. Here, we use a mass die-off of reindeer caused by lightning in Norway to test...
Article
Full-text available
Animal behaviour can affect individual fitness and is influenced by exogenous and endogenous factors. Here, we investigated how light (daylight length and moonlight), weather (precipitation and temperature), age, sex and social status affected activity and movement of a semiaquatic mammal, the Eurasian beaver (Castor fiber), using GPS relocation da...
Article
Full-text available
Predator presence can create a “landscape of fear,” which is defined as the spatially explicit distribution of perceived predation risk as seen by prey. Prey species can alter their behavior and space use as a response to increased predation risk, which might be traded off with energetic requirements. Thus, whether or not an anti‐predator behavior...
Article
Full-text available
Despite the accelerating global urbanization and its associated implications for wildlife and humans, we know little about the biology of urban ecosystems. Here, we investigated colonization and habitat selection of the European hare (Lepus europaeus), a declining farmland species, in urban areas in Denmark, using a combination of citizen science d...
Article
Although risk assessments for pesticides involve quantifying exposure routes for animals, little empirical evidence exists on how individuals use areas where pesticides were used. Further, the European Food Safety Authority guidelines for the risk assessment of birds and mammals currently only include direct dietary uptake from exposed plants as im...
Article
Full-text available
Context Human land use intensified over the last century and simultaneously, extreme weather events have become more frequent. However, little is known about the interplay between habitat structure, direct short-term weather effects and indirect seasonal effects on animal space use and behavior. Objectives We used the European hare (Lepus europaeu...
Article
Full-text available
Human encroachment on nature grows constantly, increasing human-wildlife interactions. Flight initiation distance (FID, the distance at which animals flee from an approaching threat) is often used to measure antipredator behaviour and establish buffer zones to reduce human impact on wildlife. In this study, we approached 10 waterbird species on lar...
Article
Full-text available
Global Positioning System (GPS) technology is widely used in wildlife research to study animal movement and habitat use. In order to evaluate the quality and reliability of GPS data, the factors influencing the performance of these devices must be known, especially for semiaquatic species, because terrestrial and aquatic habitat might affect GPS pe...
Data
Frequency histogram of the GPS location error (m) obtained during 33 stationary tests. (DOCX)
Data
Overview of the 36 test sites in Southeast Norway showing the fix success rate and location error separately for the three GPS models. Model TGB-317/315GX was only deployed at test sites T1-T25. NA values indicate technical problems (no data obtained). (DOCX)
Article
Full-text available
Agricultural land-use practices have intensified over the last decades, leading to population declines of various farmland species, including the European hare (Lepus eu-ropaeus). In many European countries, arable fields dominate agricultural landscapes. Compared to pastures, arable land is highly variable, resulting in a large spatial variation o...
Article
Full-text available
Chemical communication by scent‐marking is widespread among mammals and can serve different purposes, such as territory demarcation, mate attraction and self‐advertisement. In this study, we examined scent‐marking behavior by subordinate Eurasian beavers (Castor fiber) in a population in southeast Norway. We conducted scent experiments in 18 family...
Cover Page
Full-text available
Front Cover: A GPS-collared European hare (Lepus europaeus) in a barley field. During the last decades, hare populations have declined due to agricultural intensification. Vegetation height and agricultural field size are important factors affecting habitat selection by hares in arable landscapes. Thus, increasing landscape heterogeneity can increa...
Article
Full-text available
Territorial animals carry out extraterritorial movements (forays) to obtain pre-dispersal information or to increase reproductive success via extra-pair copulation. However, little is known about other purposes and spatial movement patterns of forays. In this study, we GPS-tagged 54 Eurasian beavers (Castor fiber), a year-round territorial, monogam...
Thesis
Full-text available
We studied life history strategies in the Eurasian beaver (Castor fiber), a territorial, monogamous, long-lived mammal, to increase our understanding of the mechanisms and trade-offs affecting the onset of natal dispersal, mate change, spatial movement patterns, and the duration of territory occupancy. The mean age at dispersal in our study area wa...
Article
Full-text available
Many invasive species exploit anthropogenically disturbed habitats, but most of those taxa evolved long before humans. Presumably, then, an ability to use natural (non-anthropogenic) disturbances pre-adapted invaders to a world later degraded by people. Studies on invasive species in naturally disturbed habitats thus can clarify the ancestral niche...
Article
Full-text available
In territorial, socially monogamous species, the establishment and defense of a territory are an important strategy to maximize individual fitness, but the factors responsible for the duration of territory occupancy are rarely studied, especially in long-lived mammals. A long-term monitoring program in southeast Norway spanning over 18 years allowe...
Article
Full-text available
Mate change in socially monogamous species can be explained by adaptive and non-adaptive hypotheses. Adaptive hypotheses describe a mate change as a strategy to correct for initial mate choice and to improve reproductive success: the ‘incompatibility’ hypothesis states that mate change is initiated by both mates, whereas in the ‘better option’ hypo...
Article
Full-text available
As dispersal is a dangerous part of an individual's life, its timing is important to increase the chances of survival and successful establishment of a territory. We investigated factors affecting the timing of natal dispersal in the Eurasian beaver, Castor fiber, a territorial, monogamous, long-lived mammal, using data from an 18-year individual-b...
Article
Full-text available
In tropical Australian rainforests, predators and scavengers aggregate beneath emergent trees that house large colonies of metallic starlings (Aplonis metallica), feeding in the nutrient-rich open areas below. Analysis of camera-trap records shows that the presence of feral pigs (Sus scrofa) is associated with an absence of birds (cockatoos and bru...
Article
Full-text available
Territoriality is only profitable when the benefits gained from territory exploitation exceed the costs of defence, and territory sizes are usually optimized by time constraints related to resource defence (e.g. patrolling) and exploitation. In this study, we equipped 25 dominant Eurasian beavers (Castor fiber) with GPS units to study spatial movem...
Article
Full-text available
An animal’s susceptibility to risk may be partly dependent on its body size. But are larger individuals bolder? We assessed this question by measuring time to emerge from a shelter in repeated trials on hatchling keelback snakes (Tropidonophis mairii). Estimates of repeatability of emergence times suggested they measure some underlying personality...
Article
Full-text available
The ecological impacts of introduced species can reveal mechanisms underlying habitat selection and behaviour. We investigated the habitat use of native frog species and the invasive cane toads ( Rhinella marina ) in tropical northern Australia to measure overlap in habitat use, and to test if the presence of the cane toad influences frog behaviour...
Article
Full-text available
We investigated patterns of prevalence and intensity of gastrointestinal nematode infections in a tropical natricine snake, the keelback (Tropidonophis mairii). Ninety-eight per cent of keelbacks were infected with Tanqua anomala (Gnathostomidae), with infection intensities of up to 243 worms per snake. Infection with T. anomala caused severe infla...