Martin Jung

Martin Jung
International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis | IIASA · Biodiversity and Natural Resources (BNR)

Phd

About

53
Publications
45,400
Reads
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1,611
Citations
Introduction
Widely interested in (Macro-)Ecology, Conservation Biology and Sustainability Science with regards to global change and biodiversity nexus issues. Specialist in remote-sensing analysis, ecological modelling and interpreting spatial data. Many years of experience in project management and providing quantitative solutions to environmental problems.
Additional affiliations
April 2019 - present
International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis
Position
  • Researcher
Education
September 2015 - March 2019
University of Sussex
Field of study
  • Environmental science
February 2013 - March 2015
University of Copenhagen
Field of study
  • Ecology and Evolution
October 2009 - October 2012
Philipps University of Marburg
Field of study
  • Biology

Publications

Publications (53)
Article
Full-text available
Abrupt land change, such as deforestation or agricultural intensification, is a key driver of biodiversity change. Following abrupt land change, local biodiversity often continues to be influenced through biotic lag effects. However, current understanding of how terrestrial biodiversity is impacted by past abrupt land changes is incomplete. Here we...
Article
Full-text available
We provide a global, spatially explicit characterization of 47 terrestrial habitat types, as defined in the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) habitat classification scheme, which is widely used in ecological analyses, including for quantifying species' area of Habitat. We produced this novel habitat map for the year 2015 by crea...
Article
Full-text available
Increased efforts are required to prevent further losses to terrestrial biodiversity and the ecosystem services that it provides1,2. Ambitious targets have been proposed, such as reversing the declining trends in biodiversity³; however, just feeding the growing human population will make this a challenge⁴. Here we use an ensemble of land-use and bi...
Article
Full-text available
Context There is an ongoing debate whether local biodiversity is declining and what might drive this change. Changes in land use and land cover (LULC) are suspected to impact local biodiversity. However, there is little evidence for LULC changes beyond the local scale to affect biodiversity across multiple functional groups of species, thus limiti...
Article
Full-text available
To meet the ambitious objectives of biodiversity and climate conventions, the international community requires clarity on how these objectives can be operationalized spatially and how multiple targets can be pursued concurrently. To support goal setting and the implementation of international strategies and action plans, spatial guidance is needed...
Article
Full-text available
Several safe boundaries of critical Earth system processes have already been crossed due to human perturbations; not accounting for their interactions may further narrow the safe operating space for humanity. Using expert knowledge elicitation, we explored interactions among seven variables representing Earth system processes relevant to food produ...
Article
Full-text available
Aim Many vertebrate species globally are dependent on forests, most of which require active protection to safeguard global biodiversity. Forests, however, are increasingly either being disturbed, planted or managed in the form of timber or food plantations. Because of a lack of spatial data, forest management has commonly been ignored in previous c...
Article
Full-text available
Spatially explicit information on forest management at a global scale is critical for understanding the status of forests, for planning sustainable forest management and restoration, and conservation activities. Here, we produce the first reference data set and a prototype of a globally consistent forest management map with high spatial detail on t...
Article
Full-text available
Global biodiversity is rapidly declining, and goals to halt biodiversity loss, such as the Aichi Biodiversity Targets, have not been achieved. To avoid further biodiversity loss, area-based protection will form part of new biodiversity targets. We use a state-of-the-art global land-use model, the Land System Modular Model, to explore global and reg...
Preprint
The majority of vertebrate species globally are dependent on forests, most of which require active protection to safeguard global biodiversity. Forests, however, are increasingly either being disturbed, planted or managed in the form of timber or food plantations. Because of a lack of spatial data, forest management has commonly been ignored in pre...
Preprint
Full-text available
Biodiversity varies in space and time, and often in response to environmental heterogeneity. Indicators in the form of local biodiversity measures, such as species richness or abundance, are common tools to capture this variation. The rise of readily available remote sensing data has enabled the characterization of environmental heterogeneity in a...
Article
Full-text available
Deforestation contributes to global greenhouse gas emissions and must be reduced if the 1.5°C limit to global warming is to be realized. Protected areas represent one intervention for decreasing forest loss and aiding conservation efforts, yet there is intense human pressure on at least one-third of protected areas globally. There have been numerou...
Preprint
Full-text available
Several safe boundaries of critical Earth system processes have already been crossed by human perturbations. Recent research indicates that not accounting for the interactions between these processes may further narrow the safe operating space for humanity. Yet existing work accounts only for transgression of single boundaries and only a few studie...
Article
Full-text available
Human activities are altering the structure of ecosystems, compromising the benefits they provide to nature and people. Effective conservation actions and management under ongoing global change rely on a better understanding of socio-ecological patterns and processes across broad spatiotemporal scales. Both macroecology and conservation science con...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The essential contribution of nature to addressing climate change provides an opportunity to strengthen the links between the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and the Convention on Biological Diversity. As we move towards the next Conferences of the Parties of both Conventions, there is a need to assess explicitly the role of n...
Preprint
Full-text available
paragraph To meet the ambitious objectives of biodiversity and climate conventions, countries and the international community require clarity on how these objectives can be operationalized spatially, and multiple targets be pursued concurrently ¹ . To support governments and political conventions, spatial guidance is needed to identify which areas...
Article
Full-text available
Most land on Earth has been changed by humans and past changes of land can have lasting influences on current species assemblages. Yet few globally representative studies explicitly consider such influences even though auxiliary data, such as from remote sensing, are readily available. Time series of satellite-derived data have been commonly used t...
Article
Agricultural conversion of tropical forests is a major driver of biodiversity loss. Slowing rates of deforestation is a conservation priority, but it is also useful to consider how species diversity is retained across the agricultural matrix. Here, we assess how bird diversity varies in relation to land use in the Taita Hills, Kenya. We used point...
Article
Land-use change is the single biggest driver of biodiversity loss in the tropics. Biodiversity models can be useful tools to inform policymakers and conservationists of the likely response of species to anthropogenic pressures, including land-use change. However, such models generalize biodiversity responses across wide areas and many taxa, potenti...
Article
Full-text available
The PREDICTS project—Projecting Responses of Ecological Diversity In Changing Terrestrial Systems (www.predicts.org.uk)—has collated from published studies a large, reasonably representative database of comparable samples of biodiversity from multiple sites that differ in the nature or intensity of human impacts relating to land use. We have used t...
Data
The PREDICTS project—Projecting Responses of Ecological Diversity In Changing Terrestrial Systems (www.predicts.org.uk)—has collated from published studies a large, reasonably representative database of comparable samples of biodiversity from multiple sites that differ in the nature or intensity of human impacts relating to land use. We have used t...
Article
Land use and related pressures have reduced local terrestrial biodiversity, but it is unclear how the magnitude of change relates to the recently proposed planetary boundary (“safe limit”). We estimate that land use and related pressures have already reduced local biodiversity intactness—the average proportion of natural biodiversity remaining in l...
Technical Report
A dataset of 3,250,404 measurements, collated from 26,114 sampling locations in 94 countries and representing 47,044 species. The data were collated from 480 existing spatial comparisons of local-scale biodiversity exposed to different intensities and types of anthropogenic pressures, from terrestrial sites around the world. The database was assemb...
Article
Full-text available
Globally, mature forests appear to be increasing in biomass density (BD). There is disagreement whether these increases are the result of increases in atmospheric CO 2 concentrations or a legacy effect of previous land-use. Recently, it was suggested that a threshold of 450 years should be used to define mature forests and that many forests increas...
Article
Full-text available
Globally mature forests appear to be increasing in biomass density. There is disagreement whether these increases are the result of increases in CO2 concentrations or a legacy effect of previous land-use. Recently, it was suggested that a threshold of 450 years should be used to define mature forests and that many forests increasing in biomass may...
Article
Full-text available
Globally mature forests appear to be increasing in biomass density. There is disagreement whether these increases are the result of increases in CO2 concentrations or a legacy effect of previous land-use. Recently, it was suggested that a threshold of 450 years should be used to define mature forests and that many forests increasing in biomass may...
Thesis
Aim: Land-use has severe impacts on biodiversity worldwide. Broad-scale biodiversity models are useful tools to inform policy-makers and conservationists of the likely response of species to anthropogenic pressures including land-use. Most such models must often generalize responses across a wide area, potentially missing locally important factors....
Article
Full-text available
The PREDICTS project—Projecting Responses of Ecological Diversity In Changing Terrestrial Systems (www.predicts.org.uk)—has collated from published studies a large, reasonably representative database of comparable samples of biodiversity from multiple sites that differ in the nature or intensity of human impacts relating to land use. We have used t...
Article
Full-text available
Biodiversity continues to decline in the face of increasing anthropogenic pressures such as habitat destruction, exploitation, pollution and introduction of alien species. Existing global databases of species’ threat status or population time series are dominated by charismatic species. The collation of datasets with broad taxonomic and biogeograph...
Preprint
The quantification of landscape structures is an important part in many ecological analysis dealing with GIS derived satellite data. This paper introduces a new free and open-source tool for conducting landscape ecology analysis. LecoS is able to compute a variety of basic and advanced landscape metrics in an automatized way by iterating through an...
Preprint
Full-text available
The quantification of landscape structures is an important part in many ecological analysis dealing with GIS derived satellite data. This paper introduces a new free and open-source tool for conducting landscape ecology analysis. LecoS is able to compute a variety of basic and advanced landscape metrics in an automatized way by iterating through an...
Preprint
Full-text available
The quantification of landscape structures is an important part in many ecological analysis dealing with GIS derived satellite data. This paper introduces a new free and open-source tool for conducting landscape ecology analysis. LecoS is able to compute a variety of basic and advanced landscape metrics in an automatized way by iterating through an...
Thesis
Despite increasing concerns about a loss of pollinators, there is little knowledge about how habitat fragmentation affects temperate plant-pollinators interactions. Here we investigate local habitat quality and landscape-wide effects of forest fragmentation on the specialization and diversity of quantitative temperate plant-pollinator networks. We...

Questions

Questions (3)
Question
Something I always asked myself: In the field of Landscape ecology. How do we define and parametrize the "landscape scale" from a spatial view? What counts as a landscape and what is just the minimal covering area of all field sites? Are landscapes intrinsically defined by the social-ecological boundaries of humans that interact within them or is there sth. like a general theorem that defines the spatial scale (per ecological or environmental process) that a landscape can operate on?
My current view is that landscapes as such seem to be limited (in terms of spatial scale) by the question a researcher intends to address. Some processes (such as dispersal) act on a greater landscape scale including the surrounding, while others require a much finer focus towards the studysites. But this is obviously inherently biased by my (or others) perception as a human and other species might "perceive" a landscape not (only) in terms of processes.
Appreciate any cool references to seminal or review papers that investigated this.
Question
For instance, I know of many butterflies that have multiple generations per year, but what about beetles, bees, hoverflies and so on?
Question
Hey, i am working as a lab-assistant and got a huge pile of samples from the field with Trichogramma species inside. Does anyone know of some published keys to determine Trichogramma to species level (most for all T. evanescens and T. cacociae)?

Projects

Projects (3)
Project
Website: https://naturemap.earth/ Countries need integrated maps of biodiversity and ecosystem services, including carbon, to design and implement national policies for halting and reversing the loss of biodiversity and for curbing net greenhouse gas emissions from land use. Yet, such maps are in short supply. Today marks the first release of Nature Map’s freely available global maps of terrestrial biodiversity and ecosystem carbon stocks, designed to support governments in policy design.
Archived project
Project
To build global models of how terrestrial biodiversity responds to local human impacts. We are now in the second phase of this project, where we are interested in how biodiversity responds *over time* to land-use changes and related impacts. We are currently collating data on temporal biodiversity comparisons, where sites have experienced a land use or intensity change. The first stage of this project collated data from published studies of spatial biodiversity comparisons and showed that land use and related pressures significantly impact species abundance, richness and community composition. The database will soon be made openly available.