Martin Hilpert

Martin Hilpert
Université de Neuchâtel | UniNE · Institut de langue et littérature anglaises (ILLAN)

PhD

About

96
Publications
32,132
Reads
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2,134
Citations
Citations since 2017
20 Research Items
1501 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023050100150200250300
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200250300
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200250300
Additional affiliations
May 2008 - June 2012
June 2007 - April 2008
International Computer Science Institute, Berkeley
Position
  • ICSI Berkeley
August 2003 - May 2007

Publications

Publications (96)
Article
This paper contributes to the study of grammaticalization phenomena from the perspective of Construction Grammar ( Coussé et al. 2018 ). It is concerned with modal uses of the English verb get that express a permitted action, as in The prisoners always get to make one phone call . Different views exist on the contexts in which permissive get emerge...
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Full-text available
This paper addresses the morphological word formation process that is known as clipping. In English, that process yields shortened word forms such as lab (< laboratory), exam (< examination), or gator (< alligator). It is frequently argued (Davy 2000, Durkin 2009, Haspelmath & Sims 2010, Don 2014) that clipping is highly variable and that it is dif...
Article
Full-text available
Cambridge Core - English Historical Linguistics - edited by Laurel J. Brinton
Chapter
A growing number of studies on language change adopt Construction Grammar as a theoretical framework so that there is now a developing field of Diachronic Construction Grammar. As is typical of any emerging linguistic theory, many aspects of Diachronic Construction Grammar are still not clarified explicitly, or they are understood in different ways...
Chapter
Dieser Beitrag geht der Frage nach, wie sich der Begriff der Produktivität konstruktionsgrammatisch fassen lässt und zu welchen neuen Einsichten ein solches Verständnis von Produktivität führt. Zu diesem Zweck werden einige Aspekte von Produktivität diskutiert und auf das konstruktionsgrammatische Konzept eines Netzwerks von sprachlichen Mustern be...
Article
This paper describes a method to automatically identify stages of language change in diachronic corpus data, combining variability-based neighbour clustering, which offers objective and reproducible criteria for periodization, and distributional semantics as a representation of lexical meaning. This method partitions the history of a grammatical co...
Article
Grammatical elements such as determiners, conjunctions or pronouns are very evenly dispersed across natural language data. By contrast, the uses of lexical elements have a stronger tendency to occur in bursts that are interspersed by long lulls. This paper considers two alternative explanations for this difference. First, it could be hypothesised t...
Article
Recent analyses of written text types have discovered significant frequency increases of colloquial or conversational elements, such as contractions, personal pronouns, questions or the progressive. This trend is often referred to as colloquialization. This paper presents a new perspective on colloquialization, with a special focus on the discourse...
Article
In their contribution to this special issue, De Smet & Van de Velde suggest that the analysability of a morphologically complex word is an indicator of how easily that word is primed by elements that are formed by the same word formation process. To illustrate, hearing or reading the words roughly , equally and luckily within a short span of time s...
Article
This paper presents token-based semantic vector spaces as a tool that can be applied in corpus-linguistic analyses such as word sense comparisons, comparisons of synonymous lexical items, and matching of concordance lines with a given text. We demonstrate how token-based semantic vector spaces are created, and we illustrate the kinds of result that...
Article
Why is semantic change in grammaticalization typically unidirectional? It is a well-established finding that in grammaticalizing constructions, more concrete meanings tend to evolve into more schematic meanings. Jäger & Rosenbach (2008) appeal to the psychological phenomenon of asymmetric priming in order to explain this tendency. This article aims...
Article
This corpus-based study investigates the complementation patterns of mental predicates in a cross-linguistic context. More precisely, it examines five equivalent mental verbs from English, German, and Polish and analyzes whether their complements are cognitively construed in different ways in first-person uses of those verbs as opposed to third-per...
Article
This paper discusses how modal auxiliaries fit into a constructional view of language and how this view allows us to think in new ways about diachronic meaning change in modal auxiliaries. These issues will be illustrated on the basis of a diachronic corpus-based study of the modal auxiliary may, specifically focusing on changes in its collocationa...
Chapter
Full-text available
Until recently, theoretical linguists have paid little attention to the frequency of linguistic elements in grammar and grammatical development. It is a standard assumption of (most) grammatical theories that the study of grammar (or competence) must be separated from the study of language use (or performance). However, this view of language has be...
Article
This paper addresses the recent history of noun-participle compounding in English. This word formation process is illustrated by forms such as hand-carved or computer-based. Data from the COHA shows that over the last two-hundred years, such forms have undergone a substantial increase in type and token frequency. These quantitative changes motivate...
Article
This paper explores how the visualization tool of motion charts can be used for the analysis of meaning change in linguistic constructions. In previous work, linguistic motion charts have been used to represent diachronic frequency trends and changes in the morphosyntactic behavior of linguistic units. The present paper builds on that work, but it...
Chapter
This chapter is concerned with phenomena of grammatical change in the English language, and with the question of how these phenomena can be studied in corpus-based analyses. To start out, we clarify briefly what we mean by the terms grammar, grammatical change, and corpus-based analyses. In the words of Huddleston and Pullum (2002: 3), the term gra...
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The present paper investigates the question whether different languages can be categorized into ‘constructionally tolerant’ languages, which grant speakers considerable freedom to combine syntactic constructions with lexical items in non-conventional ways, and ‘valency-driven’ languages, which impose stronger restrictions on the way in which constr...
Article
Introduces Construction Grammar as a cognitive-functional theory of language, applied to the structures of English What do speakers of English know in order to produce utterances that other speakers will understand? Construction Grammar explains how knowledge of language is organized in speakers' minds. The central and radical claim of Construction...
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Keratinocytes account for 95% of all cells of the epidermis, the stratified squamous epithelium forming the outer layer of the skin, in which a significant number of skin diseases takes root. Immortalized keratinocyte cell lines are often used as research model systems providing standardized, reproducible, and homogenous biological material. Apart...
Article
How can frequency data from diachronic corpora facilitate research into processes of language change? This paper uses an approach that dynamically visualizes complex patterns of language change (Hilpert 2011a). This technique can be likened to a flipbook of language change: a sequence of graphs visualizes a linguistic phenomenon during successive p...
Article
Full-text available
How can frequency data from diachronic corpora facilitate research into processes of language change? This paper uses an approach that dynamically visualizes complex patterns of language change (Hilpert 2011a). This technique can be likened to a ›flipbook‹ of language change: a sequence of graphs visualizes a linguistic phenomenon during successive...
Chapter
Ein Spruch, den man einige Sommer lang auf T-Shirts lesen konnte, war Bitte sprechen Sie in ganzen Sätzen: Ich lese die ZEIT. Der Begriff des Satzes, noch dazu des »ganzen Satzes«, ist wie vielleicht kein zweiter mit einer normativen Idealvorstellung von Sprache verknüpft, die sich in Form und auch Inhalt stark an der Schrift orientiert. Geordnete...
Chapter
This paper discusses an approach to historical semantics that is particularly concerned with meaning change in grammatical constructions. It focuses on a type of change that is less tangible than overt morphosyntactic change, but that is no less indicative of semantic developments, namely the changing interrelations of grammatical constructions and...
Article
This paper uses diachronic corpus data to visualize language change in a dynamic fashion. Bivariate and multivariate data sets form the input for so-called motion charts, i.e. series of diachronically ordered scatterplots that can be viewed in sequence. Based on data from COHA (Davies 2010), two case studies illustrate recent changes in American En...
Article
Martin Hilpert combines construction grammar and advanced corpus-based methodology into a new way of studying language change. Constructions are generalizations over remembered exemplars of language use. These exemplars are stored with all their formal and functional properties, yielding constructional generalizations that contain many parameters o...
Article
Full-text available
This study addresses the development of the English third-person singular present tense suffix from an interdental fricative ( giveth ) to an alveolar fricative ( gives ). Based on the PCEEC corpus, we analyze more than 20,000 examples from the time between 1417 and 1681 to determine (i) the temporal stages in which this development took place and...
Article
So-called mixed metaphors have not received much attention in cognitive linguistic research, despite acknowledgments to the fact that the combination of metaphors is in fact pervasive. This paper makes the case that mixed metaphors present a unique test case for existing theories of metaphor, in particular Conceptual Metaphor Theory and Blending Th...
Article
So-called mixed metaphors have not received much attention in cognitive linguistic research, despite acknowledgments to the fact that the combination of metaphors is in fact pervasive. This paper makes the case that mixed metaphors present a unique test case for existing theories of metaphor, in particular Conceptual Metaphor Theory and Blending Th...
Article
Full-text available
Within cognitive linguistics, there is an increasing awareness that the study of linguistic phenomena needs to be grounded in usage. Ideally, research in cognitive linguistics should be based on authentic language use, its results should be replicable, and its claims falsifiable. Consequently, more and more studies now turn to corpora as a source o...
Article
This paper discusses verb-first conditionals (Had I known this, I would have stayed at home) with regard to the hypothesis that the construction developed from a dialogual sequence into a hypotactic structure. While plausible, independent evidence for this scenario has been scarce. An alternative account posits that questions could have been analog...
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The use of corpora that are divided into temporally ordered stages is becoming increasingly wide-spread in historical corpus linguistics. This development is partly due to the fact that more and more resources of this kind are being developed. Since the assessment of frequency changes over multiple periods of time is a relatively recent practice, t...
Article
This paper discusses a usage pattern with German mit ‘with’ that is labelled here as the German mit -predicative construction. The pattern has been mentioned in previous research, but a usage-based constructional account is still missing. A qualitative analysis shows that the construction is subject to a number of constraints that point to its func...
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Full-text available
Many English adjectives form the comparative in two ways, so that, for instance, prouder occurs alongside more proud. The availability of several forms raises the general questions of when and why speakers choose one variant over the other. The aim of this article is to identify factors of language structure and language use that underlie the compa...
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This paper traces the historical development of the Swedish Pseudo-Coordination construction with the posture verb sitta “sit”. In Swedish a small number of verbs, including posture verbs such as sitta , are used in coordination with another verb to convey that the described event has an extended duration or is in progress. Quantitative evidence fr...
Chapter
This paper outlines a corpus-based method for the analysis of metonymic expressions based on a series of quantitative and qualitative analyses. While an intuitive approach to metonymy successfully identifies lexical items which have metonymic extensions, intuition alone cannot settle the question how these extensions map onto linguistic form. Consi...
Article
This paper combines quantitative corpus data and experimental evidence to address the question whether speech perception is influenced by knowledge of grammatical constructions and, more specifically, knowledge of preferred collocation patterns of these constructions. Lexical identification tasks are devised in which subjects are presented with syn...
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Full-text available
In this paper, we introduce a data-driven bottom-up clustering method for the identification of stages in diachronic corpus data that differ from each other quantitatively. Much like regular approaches to hierarchical clustering, it is based on identifying and merging the most cohesive groups of data points, but, unlike regular approaches to cluste...
Article
LANGUAGE changes all the time. Speakers produce innovations that are novel at first, but become conventionalized as they are used more and more. Some get a fair amount of press. The rise of ‘singular they’ (Has everyone got their handout?) has provoked a heated debate about proper usage (cf. Balhorn 2004). However, not all innovations have such a p...
Article
This paper is a corpus-based investigation of five Swedish constructions that are used to express futurity. The method of Collexeme Analysis (Stefanowitsch & Gries 2003) is applied to constructions with the auxiliaries ska ‘will’, skall ‘shall’, its past form skulle ‘should’, komma ‘come’, and tänka ‘think’. All of these are future markers that hav...
Article
This discussion note argues that distinctive collexeme analysis (Gries and Stefanowitsch 2004) can be applied to analyses of diachronic corpus data, and that such an application makes it a useful tool for the study of grammaticalizing constructions. In analyses of synchronic corpus data, distinctive collexeme analysis demonstrates how several given...
Article
This paper discusses whether there are elements in spoken Sinhala that can be appropriately labeled auxiliary verbs, adopting the framework of grammaticalization theory (Hopper and Traugott 1993). While auxiliaries are thought of as a nearly universal cross-linguistic category (Steele 1978), the term is not mentioned in standard works on Sinhala (G...
Article
This paper discusses whether there are elements in spoken Sinhala that can be appropriately labeled auxiliary verbs, adopting the framework of grammaticalization theory (Hopper and Traugott 1993). While auxiliaries are thought of as a nearly universal cross-linguistic category (Steele 1978), the term is not mentioned in standard works on Sinhala (G...
Article
Full-text available
This paper outlines a corpus-based method for the analysis of metonymic expressions based on a series of quantitative and qualitative analyses. While an intuitive approach to metonymy successfully identifies lexical items which have metonymic extensions, intuition alone cannot settle the question how these extensions map onto linguistic form. Consi...
Article
This chapter examines the diachronic rise of a syntactically and pragmatically complex construction type: pseudoclefts. Given that cleft constructions combine available components of grammar - relative clauses and copular clauses - do they arise in full-fledged form? If they emerge gradually, what constrains their development? We first present a co...

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