Martin Bader

Martin Bader
Linnaeus University | lnu · Department of Forestry and Wood Technology

PhD Plant Ecology

About

73
Publications
24,193
Reads
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1,745
Citations
Citations since 2016
42 Research Items
1402 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250
Additional affiliations
September 2021 - present
Linnaeus University
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
February 2017 - May 2021
Auckland University of Technology
Position
  • Lecturer
July 2012 - present
New Zealand Forest Research Institute (SCION), Rotorua, New Zealand
Position
  • Plant Ecologist/Biostatistician
Education
May 2006 - December 2009
University of Basel
Field of study
  • Plant ecophysiology
January 2005 - January 2006
The University of Waikato
Field of study
  • Biology
September 1999 - January 2006

Publications

Publications (73)
Article
Full-text available
Increasing temperatures in northern high latitudes are causing permafrost to thaw, making large amounts of previously frozen organic matter vulnerable to microbial decomposition. Permafrost thaw also creates a fragmented landscape of drier and wetter soil conditions that determine the amount and form (carbon dioxide (CO2), or methane (CH 4)) of car...
Article
Full-text available
1.Plant stress from causes such as drought is thought to increase the susceptibility of plants to herbivore attack and damage. Although this forms the basis of the widely cited plant stress hypothesis, there are few cases where this has been tested thoroughly.2.We compared the frequency of attack and damage of an invasive pine bark beetle Hylates a...
Article
Full-text available
Phytophthora plant pathogens cause tremendous damage in planted and natural systems worldwide. Phosphite is one of the only effective chemicals to control broad-scale Phytophthora disease. Little work has been done on the phytotoxic effects of phosphite application on plant communities especially in combination with plant physiological impacts. Her...
Article
Full-text available
Rapidly increasing atmospheric CO2 is not only changing the climate system but may also affect the biosphere directly through stimulation of plant growth and ecosystem carbon and nutrient cycling. Although forest ecosystems play a critical role in the global carbon cycle, experimental information on forest responses to rising CO2 is scarce, due to...
Article
Southwest Australian Banksia woodlands are highly diverse plant communities that are threatened by drought- or temperature-induced mortality due to region's changing climate. We examined water relations in dominant Banksia menziesii R. Br. trees using magnetic leaf patch clamp pressure (ZIM-) probes that allow continuous, real-time monitoring of le...
Article
Tree species differ in their physiological responses to drought, but the underlying causes are often unclear. Here we explored responses of radial growth to centennial drought events and sap flow (Fs) to seasonal drought in four mixed forests on either moist or drier sites in northwestern Switzerland. While the diffuse-porous species (Fagus sylvati...
Article
Hylurgus ligniperda (F.) and Hylastes ater (Paykull) are secondary bark beetles that have successfully spread beyond their native range, particularly into Pinus spp. plantations in the Southern Hemisphere. They feed on the phloem and cambial regions of highly stressed and recently dead Pinus spp. Here H. ligniperda and H. ater egg, larval, and pupa...
Article
Optimal stomatal theory predicts that stomata operate to maximize photosynthesis (Anet) and minimize transpirational water loss to achieve optimal intrinsic water‐use efficiency (iWUE). We tested whether this theory can predict stomatal responses to elevated atmospheric CO2 (eCO2), and whether it can capture differences in responsiveness among wood...
Article
Full-text available
Aim Biological invasions are a major threat to biodiversity in aquatic and terrestrial habitats. Insects represent an important group of species in freshwater and terrestrial habitats, and they constitute a large proportion of non‐native species. However, while many non‐native insects are known from terrestrial ecosystems, they appear to be less re...
Article
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Common myrtle (Myrtus communis L.) occurs in (semi-)arid areas of the Palearctic region where climate change, over-exploitation, and habitat destruction imperil its existence. The evergreen shrub is of great economic and ecological importance due to its pharmaceutical value, ornamental use, and its role in urban greening and habitat restoration ini...
Preprint
Full-text available
Aim Biological invasions are a major threat to biodiversity in both aquatic and terrestrial habitats. Insects represent an important group of species in freshwater and terrestrial habitats, and they constitute a large proportion of non-native species. However, while many non-native insects are known from terrestrial ecosystems, it remains unclear h...
Article
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In many arid and semi-arid regions, increasing water scarcity pushes woody species to their physiological limits, making strong drought resistance essential for adaptive forest management. Here, we examined morpho-physiological and biochemical drought responses of the forestry-relevant Persian oak (Quercus brantii Lindl.) and black poplar (Populus...
Article
Aims Despite a large number of studies examining the effects of abiotic stress factors on plants, the mechanistic explanations of drought-induced tree mortality remain inconclusive and even less is known about how multiple stressors interact. The role of non-structural carbohydrates (NSCs) in preventing or postponing drought mortality is gaining at...
Article
Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) are increasingly being used to enhance crop abiotic stress resistance. Common myrtle is an economically important essential oil-producing plant but knowledge about its drought resistance mechanisms and the drought mitigation potential of AMF and PGPR is scant. Here,...
Article
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Myrtle rust is a serious fungal disease caused by Austropuccinia psidii affecting a number of Myrtaceae species in New Zealand and elsewhere. Control with fungicides or biologicals provides a mechanism to reduce the build-up of inoculum in the short-term while other strategies are being developed or deployed for long-term management. This study eva...
Article
•Seedlings of New Zealand’s treeline forming Fuscospora cliffortioides (Hook.f.) perform poorly beyond the established canopy, limiting treeline advance. To test the long-standing assumption that photoinhibition impairs regeneration in the subalpine belt of New Zealand’s Southern Alps, we assessed photosystem II performance of seedling-sized indivi...
Article
New Zealand kauri (Agathis australis) trees are culturally, socially and ecologically significant within northern New Zealand's nutrient-poor podocarp forest ecosystems. Phytophthora agathidicida is an aggressive oomycete pathogen, capable of killing A. australis across its ecological range, causing the disease known as kauri dieback. The pathogen,...
Article
Full-text available
The charcoal disease agents, Biscogniauxia mediterranea and Obolarina persica are two latent, ascomycetous oak pathogens in the Middle Eastern Zagros forests, where they have devastating effects, particularly during drought. Under greenhouse conditions, we investigated the effects of the two charcoal disease agents individually and in combination w...
Article
Full-text available
An amendment to this paper has been published and can be accessed via a link at the top of the paper.
Article
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The impact of plants on soil enzymatic activity and their potential for remediation of oil-contaminated soil has been widely studied but information about tree species is scarce. Here, we used seedlings of four tree species (Ailanthus altissima Mill, Fraxinus rotundifolia Mill, Melia azedarach L. and Robinia pseudoacacia L.) to investigate rhizosph...
Article
Background and aims: Biotic and abiotic stressors can cause different defoliation patterns within trees. Foliar pathogens of conifers commonly prefer older needles and infection with defoliation that progresses from the bottom crown to the top. The functional role of the lower crown of trees is a key question to address the impact of defoliation c...
Article
Ambient temperature is frequently used to model the development of many herbivorous insects. Estimating development rates of cryptic saproxylic species in wood will be biased by the presence of differences between internal log temperatures, where larvae feed, and measured ambient conditions outside of logs. We tested for differences between ambient...
Article
Full-text available
The vast oak-dominated forests of the Zagros Mountains in southwestern Iran currently undergo large-scale dieback driven by a combination of drought and increasing incidence of charcoal disease caused by the fungal pathogens Biscogniauxia mediterranea and Obolarina persica. Here, we explore the interactive effects between drought and charcoal disea...
Article
Full-text available
Trees are commonly regarded as distinct entities, but the roots of many species fuse to form natural root grafts allowing the exchange of water, carbon, mineral nutrients, and microorganisms between individuals. Exploiting the phenomenon of leafless (photosynthetically inactive) tree remnants being kept alive by conspecifics, we show tight physiolo...
Article
Vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) are becoming invaluable data collection platforms for cetacean research. In particular, multi-rotors can be used to measure whales and investigate their behavior. Moreover, VTOL UAVs are increasingly accessible for recreational and commercial pilots, and close encounters with whale...
Article
The emergence of Phytophthora pluvialis as a foliar pathogen of Douglas-fir in New Zealand (NZ) and the US Pacific Northwest (PNW) has raised questions about its interaction with the widespread Swiss needle cast (SNC) disease. During spring 2017, we repeatedly sampled 30 trees along an environmental gradient in each region, and 292 additional trees...
Article
Full-text available
Trees are commonly regarded as distinct entities, but the roots of many species fuse to form natural root grafts allowing the exchange of water, carbon, mineral nutrients, and microorganisms between individuals. Exploiting the phenomenon of leafless (photosynthetically inactive) tree remnants being kept alive by conspecifics, we show tight physiolo...
Article
Full-text available
Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) represent a novel and cost effective research tool to investigate cetacean behaviour, as conventional aircraft are expensive, limited in the altitude they can fly at and potentially disturb sensitive wildlife. In addition, the aerial observation from the UAVs allows assessment of cetacean behaviour from an advantageo...
Article
Red needle cast is a significant foliar disease of commercial stands of Pinus radiata caused by Phytophthora pluvialis in New Zealand. The effect of copper, applied as a foliar spray of cuprous oxide at a range of doses between 0 and 1.72 kg ha-1, was investigated in two controlled trials with potted plants and in an operational trial with mature P...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the epidemiology of infectious diseases in a host population is a major challenge in forestry. Radiata pine plantations in New Zealand are impacted by a foliar disease, red needle cast (RNC), caused by Phytophthora pluvialis. This pathogen is dispersed by water splash with polycyclic infection affecting the lower part of the tree cano...
Article
Full-text available
Industrial roundwood is an important commodity with global trade of 125 million m³ in 2016. Fumigation is the main phytosanitary treatment for bulk wood commodities. Joule heating is a potential alternative phytosanitary treatment for export Pinus radiata D. Don (Pinaceae) logs, but its effectiveness against insects has not yet been confirmed exper...
Article
Full-text available
Despite progress in prevention and management of biological invasions, challenges remain, including difficulties with assessing future invasion risks. Predicting the identity of potentially damaging invaders is complex because they are often unknown as pests in their natural range. We used a plant sentinel approach to assess host ranges of invasive...
Article
Full-text available
Phytosanitary treatments are applied to minimize the movement of forest insects when trading export logs and timber. Treatments must prove effective against quarantine pests. However, to date, phytosanitary treatment development rarely incorporates biological information about pest location within a commodity. Incorporating such knowledge may lead...
Article
Full-text available
Breeding for disease resistance or tolerance is a viable option for disease management programmes and is important for the continued success and resilience of planted forests. Red needle cast (RNC) is a disease that affects radiata pine (Pinus radiata) and is caused by Phytophthora pluvialis. Knowledge is still very limited regarding the potential...
Article
Full-text available
Survival, growth rates and functionality of larvae have been hypothesised to correlate with higher lipid provisioning in older teleosts. To test the lipid provisioning part of this hypothesis, we investigated the total and relative (mg/g) lipid (triglyceride) concentration in both the source (liver) and sink (gonad) lipidation organs of female snap...
Article
Phytophthora pluvialis is associated with early defoliation and shoot dieback in Douglas fir in Oregon and New Zealand. In 2013, P. pluvialis was described from mixed tanoak-Douglas-fir forests in the Pacific Northwest and concurrently recognized as the main causal agent of red needle cast (RNC) in New Zealand radiata pine plantations. Little is kn...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the effects of increasing temperature is central in explaining the effects of climate change on vegetation. Here, we investigate how warming affects vegetation regeneration and root biomass and if there is an interactive effect of warming with other environmental variables. We also examine if geothermal warming effects on vegetation r...
Article
Twelve active ingredients were screened for their ability to control foliage disease caused by Phytophthora kernoviae and Phytophthora pluvialis. Inhibition of mycelial growth and sporangial production of both pathogens were assessed in in vitro assays after exposure to three concentrations of each active ingredient. While most of these active ingr...
Article
Full-text available
Plant-feeding insects use visual and olfactory cues (shape, color, plant volatiles) for host location, but the relative importance of different cues and interactions with non-host-plant volatiles in ecosystems of varying plant biodiversity is unclear for most species. We studied invasive bark beetles and wood borers associated with pine trees to ch...
Article
Full-text available
1. Dispersal and host detection are behaviours promoting the spread of invading populations in a landscape matrix. In fragmented landscapes, the spatial arrangement of habitat structure affects the dispersal success of organisms. 2. The aim of the present study was to determine the long distance dispersal capabilities of two non-native pine bark b...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The objective of this research was to assess the current state-of-knowledge on the risks and benefits of using fire as a rural land management tool, including historical and current practices and the effects on New Zealand’s environment. More specifically, the main objectives of this research in New Zealand were to;  Understand when, where and how...
Article
Are mature forests carbon limited? To explore this question, we exposed ca. 110-year-old, 40-m tall Picea abies trees to a 550-ppm CO2 concentration in a mixed lowland forest in NW Switzerland. The site receives substantial soluble nitrogen (N) via atmospheric deposition, and thus, trees are unlikely N-limited. We used a construction crane to opera...
Article
Full-text available
Mediterranean climate ecosystems (MCEs) are amongst the most heavily degraded ecosystems worldwide. Restoration efforts are challenged by high vulnerability to extreme drought, which is projected to become more frequent with future climate change. The aim of our study was to determine whether restoration efforts could be enhanced through the indivi...
Article
Understanding the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 on carbon (C) relations of mature forest trees is central to understanding ecosystem C fluxes and pools in a future high-CO2 world. Here, we investigated the CO2-induced photosynthetic enhancement and the diurnal variation in shoot carbon assimilation, stem CO2 efflux and soil respiration associ...
Article
Full-text available
Background: The oomycete Phytophthora kernoviae is known from the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland, where it is considered to be a recent invader, from Chile where it was only discovered in 2014, and New Zealand where records date back to 1953. As there is little information in New Zealand linking P. kernoviae with plant disease, it may h...
Research
Full-text available
An outreach bulletin describing a newly developed fertiliser for sandy soils
Article
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Two saproxylic forest insects, Hylurgus ligniperda (F.) (Coleoptera: Scolytinae) and Arhopalus ferus (Mulsant) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), were reared on artificial or natural diet at 15 or 25°C to compare larval growth rates and survival. A significant diet by temperature interaction was observed in the growth of H. ligniperda larvae, which develo...
Poster
Full-text available
While fire use has great benefit to rural land managers, it also carries risk. New Zealand has over 3000 wildfires per year, of which around 20% and almost half the area burned are the result of land management burns escaping or becoming out of control. Despite this, the risks and benefits of using fire as a land management tool are currently not w...
Article
Full-text available
Rising atmospheric [CO2], ca, is expected to affect stomatal regulation of leaf gas-exchange of woody plants, thus influencing energy fluxes as well as carbon (C), water, and nutrient cycling of forests. Researchers have proposed various strategies for stomatal regulation of leaf gas-exchange that include maintaining a constant leaf internal [CO2],...
Article
Full-text available
With their dominant share in global plant biomass carbon (C), forests and their responses to atmospheric CO2 enrichment are key to the global C balance. In this free air CO2 enrichment (FACE) study, we assessed respiratory losses from stems and soil, and fine root growth of ca. 110-year-old Picea abies growing in a near-natural forest in NW Switzer...
Article
Full-text available
Pest eradication strategies that use pesticides require application methods that have the lowest environmental and human health impact while maintaining the highest probability of success. This is highly important when eradication takes place in sensitive areas, such as urban or riparian zones. A new aerial application method, the spot-gun, was dev...
Article
Full-text available
Recognition of the extent and magnitude of night-time light pollution impacts on natural ecosystems is increasing, with pervasive effects observed in both nocturnal and diurnal species. Municipal and industrial lighting is on the cusp of a step change where energy-efficient lighting technology is driving a shift from ''yellow'' high-pressure sodium...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Background/Question/Methods Rapidly increasing atmospheric CO2 is not only changing the climate system but may also affect the biosphere directly through stimulation of plant growth and ecosystem carbon and nutrient cycling. Although forest ecosystems play a critical role in the global carbon cycle, experimental information on forest responses to...
Article
Full-text available
Phosphorous acid is being investigated as a fungicide for the management of a needle disease caused by Phytophthora pluvialis in Pinus radiata in New Zealand. However, little is known about the penetration characteristics of this fungicide into Pinus radiata foliage. This study was undertaken to determine: i) the penetration characteristics of a co...
Article
Full-text available
Red needle cast, a new foliage disease of Pinus radiata in New Zealand is described. The disease has been variable in incidence and severity both regionally and in different years. The early symptoms of discrete olive coloured lesions, often with a narrow dark resinous mark or band, were first recognised in winter of 2008 in plantation forests on t...
Article
Full-text available
There is evidence of continued stimulation of foliage photosynthesis in trees exposed to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations; however, this is mostly without a proportional growth response. Consequently, we lack information on the fate of this extra carbon (C) acquired. By a steady application of a (13)CO2 label in a free air CO2 enrichment (FA...
Article
New Zealand currently exports 47 billion of wood products including more than 127 million m3 of logs (almost all Pinus radiata) Currently all logs are treated to eliminate infestation by phytosanitary pests with these treatments being specified by the import requirements of trading partners The most common treatment used at present is fumigation wi...
Article
Full-text available
Rising levels of atmospheric CO(2) have often been reported to reduce plant water use. Such behavior is also predicted by standard equations relating photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, and atmospheric CO(2) concentration, which form the core of dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs). Here, we provide first results from a free air CO(2) enrichm...