Martin Albert

Martin Albert
Boston University | BU · Department of Neurology

MD, PhD

About

206
Publications
29,409
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9,799
Citations
Citations since 2017
6 Research Items
1800 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023050100150200250300
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200250300
Introduction
Martin L. Albert, MD, PhD, Professor of Neurology at Boston University School of Medicine, is a research specialist in Behavioral Neurology, Cognitive Neuroscience, the Neurology of Aging, and Neuropsychiatry. He has been elected by his peers as one of the "Best Doctors in America" every year for the past 20 years. Among his most recent publications is the book with Dalia Cahana-Amitay, Redefining Recovery from Aphasia. Dr. Albert’s current research interests focus on language and language disorders, and dementia and the cognitive changes of aging.

Publications

Publications (206)
Article
Full-text available
Objectives: To better understand and compare effects of aging and education across domains of language and cognition, we investigated whether 1) these domains show different associations with age and education, 2) these domains show similar patterns of age-related change over time, and 3) education moderates the rate of decline in these domains....
Article
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Background/Study Context: Lexical retrieval abilities and executive function skills decline with age. The extent to which these processes might be interdependent remains unknown. The aim of the current study was to examine whether individual differences in three executive functions (shifting, fluency, and inhibition) predicted naming performance in...
Article
Background: This study explored the association between pulmonary function (PF) and older adults’ language performance accuracy. Study rationale was anchored in aging research reporting PF as a reliable risk factor affecting cognition among the elderly. Methods: 180 adult English native speakers aged 55 to 84 years participated in the study. PF was...
Article
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Findings regarding the relation between naming and inhibition among older adults is limited. We posited inhibitory control is crucial for successful naming and tested its role in older adults by exaggerating its effects. Participants included 215 older adults aged 55-89 years, categorized as “good” or “poor” namers, based on confrontation naming sc...
Chapter
Background: Among the obstacles to demonstrating efficacy of pharmacological inter- vention for aphasia is quantifying patients responses to treatment in a statistically valid and reliable manner. In many of the review papers on this topic, detailed discussions of various methodological problems are highlighted, with some suggestions on how these s...
Article
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This study examined the effects of executive control and working memory on older adults' sentence-final word recognition. The question we addressed was the importance of executive functions to this process and how it is modulated by the predictability of the speech material. To this end, we tested 173 neurologically intact adult native English spea...
Article
Aphasia therapy, while demonstrably successful, has been limited by its primary focus on language, with relatively less attention paid to nonlinguistic factors (cognitive, affective, praxic) that play a major role in recovery from aphasia. Neuroscientific studies of the past 15-20 years have opened a breach in the wall of traditional clinico-anatom...
Article
Full-text available
This is a proof-of-concept case study designed to evaluate the presence of “Linguistic Anxiety” in a person with mild aphasia. The participant (aged 68) was tested on linguistic and non-linguistic cognitive tasks administered under conditions that differed in levels of anxiety. A validated anxiety-induction technique rarely used in previous aphasia...
Article
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This study explored effects of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) on language in aging. MetS is a constellation of five vascular and metabolic risk factors associated with the development of chronic diseases and increased risk of mortality, as well as brain and cognitive impairments. We tested 281 English-speaking older adults aged 55–84, free of stroke...
Chapter
Chapter 3 reviews the neurocognitive imprint of executive functions on recovery from aphasia. It briefly summarizes what is known about the neural underpinnings of executive functions in the nonaphasic population, highlighting models elucidating the specific relationship between executive functions and language, such as semantic control. It then di...
Chapter
Chapter 1 presents the goal of the book, as it sets out to refocus clinical and research approaches to recovery from aphasia from a language-centric understanding of brain-language relations to one where the entire panoply of cognitive phenomena and neural events interact to influence recovery from aphasia. The book highlights the weight of nonling...
Chapter
Chapter 6 discusses the current understanding of how stroke-induced emotional changes in persons with aphasia, such as depression and anxiety, contribute to behavioral and neural changes during language recovery. It first portrays how symptoms of depression and anxiety affect cognitive function among nonaphasic persons and highlight the neural basi...
Chapter
Chapter 9 summarizes the key concepts introduced throughout the book, which point to two fundamental aspects of brain-language relations: one, theoretical, regarding the neural organization of nonlinguistic-linguistic interconnections in the healthy brain; the other, clinical, regarding the use of such knowledge to characterize functional recovery...
Book
This online resource focuses on two fundamental aspects of brain-language relations, and discusses the neural organization of language in the healthy brain, and challenges current approaches to treatment of aphasia by offering a new theory for recovery from aphasia. It covers neural multifunctionality, or the constant and dynamic incorporation of n...
Article
Full-text available
THIS REVIEW PAPER PRESENTS CONVERGING EVIDENCE FROM STUDIES OF BRAIN DAMAGE AND LONGITUDINAL STUDIES OF LANGUAGE IN AGING WHICH SUPPORTS THE FOLLOWING THESIS: the neural basis of language can best be understood by the concept of neural multifunctionality. In this paper the term "neural multifunctionality" refers to incorporation of nonlinguistic fu...
Article
Background Good pulmonary function (PF) is associated with preservation of cognitive performance, primarily of executive functions, in aging (Albert et al., 1995; Chyou et al., 1996; Emery, Finkel, & Pedersen, 2012; Yohannes & Gindo, 2013). The contribution of PF to older adults’ language abilities, however, has never been explored, to our knowled...
Article
Among the obstacles to demonstrating efficacy of pharmacological intervention for aphasia is quantifying patients' responses to treatment in a statistically valid and reliable manner. In many of the review papers on this topic (e.g., Berthier et al., 2011; de Boissezon, Peran, de Boysson, & Démonet, 2007; Small & Llano, 2009), detailed discussions...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives: To assess the impact of hypertension and diabetes mellitus on sentence comprehension in older adults. Method: Two hundred and ninety-five adults aged 55 to 84 (52% men) participated in this study. Self-report mail survey combined with medical evaluations were used to determine eligibility. Multiple sources were used to determine whet...
Article
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This study evaluates the involvement of switching skills and working-memory capacity in auditory sentence processing in older adults. The authors examined 241 healthy participants, aged 55 to 88 years, who completed four neuropsychological tasks and two sentence-processing tasks. In addition to age and the expected contribution of working memory, s...
Article
BACKGROUND: Persons with aphasia often report feeling anxious when using language while communicating. While many patients, caregivers, clinicians and researchers would agree that language may be a stressor for persons with aphasia, systematic empirical studies of stress and/or anxiety in aphasia remain scarce. AIM: The aim of this paper is to revi...
Chapter
Chapter 42 reviews literature on age-related changes in lexical retrieval and sentence processing, considering, in particular, clinically relevant cognitive-related, health-related, and brain-related aspects of these changes.
Article
This resource features 60 chapters written by the world's elite clinicians from neurology, geriatrics and research on all aspects of geriatric neurology, and the authors have incorporated the geriatric care perspective and a quality-oriented approach to health care throughout, resulting in the definitive reference for all clinicians caring for olde...
Article
To determine structural brain correlates of naming abilities in older adults, we tested 24 individuals aged 56-79 on two confrontation-naming tests (the Boston Naming Test (BNT) and the Action Naming Test (ANT)), then collected from these individuals structural Magnetic-Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) data. Overall, sever...
Article
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common progressive dementia syndrome of the elderly. Because of prevalence, lack of mechanism-based treatments, care costs, and impact on individuals and families, AD is an extraordinarily challenging disease. It is characterized by dysfunction and death of specific populations of neurons, particularly those in...
Article
To evaluate effects of health status on word-finding difficulty in aging, adjusting for the known contributors of education, sex, and ethnicity. Cross-sectional. Community. Two hundred eighty-four adults aged 55 to 85 (48.6% female) participating in an ongoing longitudinal study of language in aging. Medical, neurological, and laboratory evaluation...
Article
Full-text available
This cross-linguistic study investigated Semantic Verbal Fluency (SVF) performance in 30 American English-speaking and 30 Finnish-speaking healthy elderly adults with different cultural and linguistic backgrounds. Despite the different backgrounds of the participant groups, remarkable similarities were found between the groups in the overall SVF pe...
Chapter
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For those who study impairments of language function resulting from disease or injury to the brain, development of a comprehensive model of brain-language relationships is an ultimate goal. To achieve this goal, we propose that the language disorders which accompany dementia be viewed as if they were variations of classical aphasic syndromes. This...
Chapter
aphasia;neuropsychology;dementia;language dysfunction;pathological changes
Article
Background/aims and methods: Perseveration is common in Alzheimer's disease (AD). We document the type and quantitative burden of perseveration as cognitive decline progresses from normal aging (n = 30) through mild AD (n = 20) to moderate AD (n = 20) by administering a semantic verbal fluency task. Results: We found perseveration to increase si...
Article
Four patients with the diagnosis of hysterical hemiparesis and normal magnetic resonance imagings were referred to us for further evaluation. All were being treated with antidepressant or antianxiety drugs or both, with no benefit. In all 4 cases single photon emission computed tomography revealed decreased regional cerebral blood flow in frontal r...
Article
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We conducted multivariate random-effect analyses on longitudinal data from 238 adults, ranging in age from 30 to 94, who were tested on five lexical tests over a period of 20 years to examine (a) the relations between lemma and lexeme retrieval as manifested in different tests of lexical retrieval and (b) changes in lexical processing during older...
Article
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Assessments and clinical understanding of late-onset delusions in the elderly are inconsistent and often incomplete. In this review, we consider the prevalence, neurobehavioral features, and neuroanatomic correlations of delusions in elderly persons - those with documented cognitive decline and those with no evidence of cognitive decline. Both grou...
Article
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Neuropharmacologic rehabilitation of cognitive deficits is a field waiting to be created. NIH, with its Roadmap Initiative for Translational Research, is pushing hard, but clinicians and scientists, for the most part, have yet to accept the challenge. The goal of this Special Issue is to document the current state of the art. As readers will note,...
Article
The objective of our study was to assess the relation of current pain ratings to observer versus field modes of memory retrieval in patients with chronic pain. Memories from an observer perspective involve seeing oneself in the original event as if from an external point of view; memories from a field perspective involve recalling the event as if v...
Article
In this article we will review available evidence concerning the effects of forebrain catecholaminergic and cholinergic activity on verbal perseveration. The anatomy and physiology of these two major neuropharmacological systems make it likely that they influence speech and language functioning directly as well as the cognitive systems that have an...
Article
Full-text available
Using longitudinal data on the Boston Naming Test ( Kaplan, Goodglass, & Weintraub, 1983) collected over 20 years from healthy individuals aged 30 to 94, we examined change in lexical retrieval with age, gender, education, and their interactions. We compared results between random-effects longitudinal and traditional cross-sectional models. Random-...
Article
The neurochemistry of language and the neuropharmacology of aphasia are two domains of cognitive neuroscience still in their infancy. In this article we review what is known about these two domains, especially with regard to treating aphasia with drugs. Selected neurotransmitters can improve language function in certain patients with aphasia. We di...
Article
The concept of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) draws attention to cognitive changes not severe enough to warrant the diagnosis of dementia. As used today, it covers many pathological disorders and characterises a diverse population of patients who attend memory clinics. Our concern is the underlying heterogeneity. We suggest that it will soon be po...
Article
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This study tests the hypothesis that retrieval of object and action names declines at different rates with age. Uncued and cued performance on the Boston Naming Test (BNT) and the Action Naming Test (ANT) were examined for 171 individuals from 50 to 88 years old. To control for differences in item difficulty, a subset of items from each of the two...
Article
Low levels of educational attainment and low socioeconomic status have been significantly linked to poor health and increased incidence of disease, including Alzheimer's disease and diseases of the cardiovascular, pulmonary, renal, and gastrointestinal systems. Our goal in the present study was to determine the degree to which educational level and...
Chapter
The detailed analysis of chemico-cognitive correlates of language is in its premature stage as the cognitive systems involved in the processes of language have not, themselves, been fully detailed. The process of naming a seen object (confrontation naming) is often considered in cognitive science to depend on three stages, each with subcomponents....
Article
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This study investigated the impaired lexical access and semantic degradation hypotheses as two potential explanations of naming failures in normal aging. Naming responses on the Boston Naming Test (BNT) and Action Naming Test (ANT) were analyzed across three test sessions for 39 adults from three age groups (50s, 60s, and 70s). Failures to name bef...
Article
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We review the literature on pain and aging and conclude that evidence supports a hypothesis that right frontal cortex contributes to the mediation of the chronic pain experience in elderly persons with chronic pain syndromes. Evidence for the right frontal pain hypothesis comes from clinical, neurocognitive, and neuroimaging studies, which implicat...
Article
We review historical aspects of dementia, the current status of the syndrome, and the relation between cognitive changes of normal aging and cognitive changes of dementia. We discuss the role of sociocultural factors on the diagnosis of dementia and the nature of personhood. We offer an alternative operational definition for dementia, namely, a dis...
Article
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A distinctive, language related fragment of the environmental dependency syndrome is described: compulsive, involuntary, environmentally dependent speaking. Because this syndrome represents the observe of aphasia, it is named forced hyperphasia. An 84 year old woman with acute left frontal infarction was admitted to hospital with gait disturbance,...
Article
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Few studies have examined verb naming in normal aging, although decline in the ability to name nouns has been well documented. In this study, we examined longitudinal performance on the Action Naming Test (ANT), a confrontation naming test for verbs. The purpose of this study was to confirm the verb naming deficit associated with aging, which was p...
Article
Approximately 1 million people have aphasia in the United States today, yet with properly targeted therapy in selected patients effective communication can be restored. Current approaches to treatment of aphasia include psycholinguistic theory-driven therapy, cognitive neurorehabilitation, computer-aided techniques, psychosocial management, and (st...
Article
This study examined 12 aphasia patients at approximately 1 year poststroke (Time 1) and again at 5-12 years poststroke (Time 2) with language testing and CT scan. Significant increases in naming scores, and phrase length in nonfluent speech were observed after 5 years poststroke. Significant expansion in visible lesion borders (lesion size) was obs...
Article
A comprehensive neuropsychological test battery was administered to 3 patients who met the clinical criteria of corticobasal degeneration (CBD). The pattern of neuropsychological deficits in CBD appears to be a distinctive mixture of posterior cortical dysfunction and frontal-subcortical system impairment.
Article
This study investigated the nature of naming errors produced on the Boston Naming Test by patients with mild and moderate Alzheimer's disease (AD) and elderly and young controls, using a newly devised scoring system. This new approach involved ratings of error responses on a scale of semantic relatedness to the target name. Error responses of both...
Article
We studied long-term recovery from Ideomotor apraxia < 10 years after onset in 15 subjects with aphasia and apraxia. A detailed battery of praxis and language tests was administered twice: at a mean of 4.5 months after onset (T1) and at a mean of 81.6 months after onset (T2). Long-term recovery from apraxia - both limb apraxia (LA) and buccofacial...
Article
Full-text available
Longitudinal performance on the Boston Naming Test (BNT) was evaluated in 53 normal subjects aged 30 to 79 who were each tested three times over a 7-year span. Naming performance showed a significant decline over time that was greatest for the oldest subjects. These results confirm that decline in naming is a real phenomenon in normal aging that ca...
Article
Subject selection criteria and descriptive data were compiled from 15 consecutive aphasia group studies published in Brain and Language from its inception (1974-1976) and two decades later. While some measures remain constant (aphasia type and lesion site are most commonly used in both periods), additional measures are reported only or more frequen...
Article
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Performance profiles of patients with different dementia syndromes (Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease) were compared with each other and with those of neurologically impaired and healthy individuals without dementia on a new instrument for screening dementia, the Cross-Cultural Cognitive Examination (CCCE). The CCCE measures discriminated...
Article
Performance profiles of patients with different dementia syndromes (Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease) were compared with each other and with those of neurologically impaired and healthy individuals without dementia on a new instrument for screening dementia, the Cross-Cultural Cognitive Examination (CCCE). The CCCE measures discriminated...
Article
Signs of language dysfunction in dementia of the Alzheimer's type (DAT) and in the aphasic syndromes of transcortical sensory aphasia and Wernicke's aphasia are superficially similar. The unresolved question concerning the extent to which the language disturbances of DAT are "aphasic" is linked to a more fundamental question concerning the relation...
Article
We describe a patient who sustained multifocal cerebral injuries as the result of a fall. She was left with significant speech and motor abnormalities that were resistant to speech and physical therapy. Introduction of bromocriptine and carbidopa/L-dopa 2 and 3 years, respectively, after the injury resulted in dramatic improvements in speech and mo...
Article
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The goal of this study was to characterize the cumulative effects of multiple strokes on cognition. We conducted a prospective, longitudinal case study with neuropsychological, neurological, and radiological evaluations. Research was conducted at the Boston (Mass) Veterans Administration Medical Center, Neurology Service, on successive inpatient ho...
Article
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Validation of a new instrument for screening dementia, the Cross Cultural Cognitive Examination (CCCE), is described. Criterion and concurrent validation and cross-cultural comparison of a new instrument. All individuals over the age of 40 in a village in southern Guam participated in a door-to-door survey. Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Disease patie...
Thesis
This thesis examines the Reshetikhin and Turaev tangle invariants associated with the quantum group U$\sb{q}$(sl(3,C)) when q is a primitive root of unity. We prove a formula which relates arbitrary words in the lowering algebra of U$\sb{q}$(sl(3,C)) to ones in Lusztig's canonical basis. This allows us to explicitly construct highest weight represe...
Article
Criterion validity of a two-stage cross-cultural cognitive Examination (CCCE) designed for epidemiologic use was evaluated in japanese subjects by comparison with a physician's DSM-III-R diagnosis of dementia and the hasegawa Dementia Rating Scale (the standard Japanese instrument similar to the Mini-Mental State exam). We report on 188 subjects te...
Article
We examined the abilities of 15 patients with dementia of the Alzheimer type (DAT), 22 patients with Parkinson's Disease (PD), and 141 healthy subjects (ranging in age from 30 to 79 years) to detect and correct their own speech errors. Each subject was shown the Cookie Theft picture of the BDAE (Goodglass & Kaplan, 1972. The assessment of aphasia a...
Article
Full-text available
Comprehension of six syntactic structures was tested across four age groups. Each structure was presented with both plausible and implausible content. The contribution of cognitive nonlinguistic factors important for comprehension (attention, short-term memory, and mental control) was tested via standard neuropsychological tasks. Sixty-six women ag...