Martin Aberhan

Martin Aberhan
Museum für Naturkunde - Leibniz Institute for Evolution and Biodiversity Science

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120
Publications
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Publications

Publications (120)
Article
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Anthropogenic global warming is redistributing marine life and may threaten tropical benthic invertebrates with several potential extinction mechanisms. The net impact of climate change on geographical extinction risk nevertheless remains uncertain. Evidence of widespread climate-driven extinctions and of potentially unidentified mechanisms exists...
Article
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The end-Permian mass extinction occurred alongside a large swath of environmental changes that are often invoked as extinction mechanisms, even when a direct link is lacking. One way to elucidate the cause(s) of a mass extinction is to investigate extinction selectivity, as it can reveal critical information on organismic traits as key determinants...
Article
The end-Triassic mass extinction is one of the big five extinction events in Phanerozoic Earth history. It is linked with the emplacement of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province and a host of interconnected environmental and climatic responses that caused profound deterioration of terrestrial and marine biospheres. Current understanding, however,...
Chapter
Palaeoenvironments are depositional environments of the geological past. Palaeoenvironmental reconstructions use the combined evidence derived from physical characteristics of sedimentary deposits, fossil content and geochemical signatures of rocks and skeletal hard parts. Mineralogical composition, grain size, sedimentary structures and bedding of...
Article
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Organismic groups vary non‐randomly in their vulnerability to extinction. However, it is unclear whether the same groups are consistently vulnerable, regardless of the dominant extinction drivers, or whether certain drivers have their own distinctive and predictable victims. Given the challenges presented by anthropogenic global warming, we focus o...
Article
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The Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event (TOAE; Early Jurassic, ca. 182 Ma ago) represents one of the major environmental disturbances of the Mesozoic and is associated with global warming, widespread anoxia, and a severe perturbation of the global carbon cycle. Warming-related dysoxia-anoxia has long been considered the main cause of elevated marine exti...
Preprint
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Decision tree algorithms are rarely utilized in paleontological research, and here we show that machine learning algorithms can be used to identify determinants of extinction as well as predict extinction risk. This application of decision tree algorithms is important because the ecological selectivity of mass extinctions can reveal critical inform...
Article
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Along the Dinaric–Hellenic orogen, the Late Jurassic – Early Cretaceous ophiolite obduction over the Adria continental margin was sealed by sedimentation of clastic terrestrial deposits rapidly followed by a widespread carbonate platform system since the Early Cretaceous period. These Cretaceous sediments presently crop out over areas of varying ex...
Conference Paper
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The impact of mass extinctions on the body sizes of animals has received considerable attention and debate, as to whether the reduced size of post-extinction organisms is due to the selective extinction of large species, absence of large species as a stochastic effect of low-diversity faunas, or a size decrease within surviving genera and species....
Article
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Many aspects of the supposed hyperthermal Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event (T-OAE, Early Jurassic, c. 182 Ma) are well understood but a lack of robust palaeotemperature data severely limits reconstruction of the processes that drove the t-oAe and associated environmental and biotic changes. new oxygen isotope data from calcite shells of the benthic fa...
Article
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The Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event (TOAE, Early Jurassic, ~182 Ma ago) was characterised by severe environmental perturbations which led to habitat degradation and extinction of marine species. Warming-induced anoxia is usually identified as main driver, but because marine life was also affected in oxygenated environments the role of raised temperat...
Article
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The hyperthermal events of the Cenozoic, including the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum, provide an opportunity to investigate the potential effects of climate warming on marine ecosystems. Here, we examine the shallow benthic marine communities preserved in the late Cretaceous to Eocene strata on the Gulf Coastal Plain (United States). In stark co...
Article
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Climate change challenges marine organisms by constraining their temperature-dependent scope for performance, fitness, and survival. According to the concept of Oxygen and Capacity Limited Thermal Tolerance (OCLTT), the overall thermal performance curve relates to an organism’s aerobic power budget, its overall aerobic scope for growth, exercise, r...
Article
Full-text available
Fundamental ecological and evolutionary theories, such as community saturation and diversity-dependent diversification, assume that biotic competition restricts resource use, and thus limits realized niche breadth and geographic range size [1-3]. This principle is called competitive exclusion. The corollary (ecological release) posits that, after c...
Article
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Reduction of body size is a common response of organisms to environmental stress. Studying the early Toarcian succession in the Lusitanian Basin of Portugal, we tested whether the shell size of benthic marine communities of bivalves and brachiopods changed at and before the global, warming–related Toarcian oceanic anoxic event (T-OAE). Statistical...
Conference Paper
The end-Permian mass extinction coincides with the eruptions of the Siberian Traps, a Large Igneous Province, that passed through carbon-rich sedimentary rocks, with both factors causing a massive injection of large volumes of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere that are hypothesized as causing the end-Permian mass extinction. Volcanic eruptions a...
Article
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Biotic interactions such as competition, predation, and niche construction are fundamental drivers of biodiversity at the local scale, yet their long-term effect during earth history remains controversial. To test their role and explore potential limits to biodiversity, we determine within-habitat (alpha), between-habitat (beta), and overall (gamma...
Article
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Investigating samples of the cancellothyridid brachiopod Terebratulina collected during the IceAGE (Me85/3) expedition of RV METEOR at the continental shelf around Iceland with both morphometrical and molecular methods, we were for the first time able to detect a hybridization event between brachiopod sister species, which are thought to have separ...
Article
Understanding the drivers of macroevolutionary trends through the Phanerozoic has been a central question in paleobiology. Increasingly important is understanding the regional and environmental variation of macroevolutionary patterns and how they are reflected at the global scale. Here we test the role of biotic interactions on regional ecological...
Article
In the Early Jurassic, the late Pliensbachian through early Toarcian interval exhibits significant environmental perturbations and biotic extinctions. This study documents the macrobenthic community during this interval in a region that has previously received comparatively little study: northeastern Panthalassa. The relicts of benthic communities...
Conference Paper
A central question in paleobiology is whether physical or biological processes were the dominant drivers of Phanerozoic macroevolutionary trends. Increasingly important is understanding the regional and environmental variation in these macroevolutionary trends. Here we track regional ecological patterns during the Jurassic in the midst of the Mesoz...
Article
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2015. Centrichnus eccentricus re-visited: A new view on anomiid bivalve bioerosion. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica 60 (3): 539–549. Saddle oysters (Anomiidae) attach themselves to calcareous hard substrates by means of a calcified byssus that etches an attachment structure, referred to as ichnospecies Centrichnus eccentricus. Examination of rich mat...
Article
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Contemporary biodiversity loss and population declines threaten to push the biosphere toward a tipping point with irreversible effects on ecosystem composition and function. As a potential example of a global-scale regime shift in the geological past, we assessed ecological changes across the end-Cretaceous mass extinction based on molluscan assemb...
Article
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Studies of the dynamics of biodiversity often suggest that diversity has upper limits, but the complex interplay between ecological and evolutionary processes and the relative role of biotic and abiotic factors that set upper limits to diversity are poorly understood. Here we statistically assess the relationship between global biodiversity and the...
Article
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We analysed field-collected quantitative data of benthic marine molluscs across the Cretaceous-Palaeogene boundary in Patagonia to identify patterns and processes of biodiversity reconstruction after the end-Cretaceous mass extinction. We contrast diversity dynamics from nearshore environments with those from offshore environments. In both settings...
Article
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The end-Permian extinction decimated marine life on an unprecedented scale. However, an analysis of the lifestyles of the surviving genera shows that very little functional diversity was lost at the sea floor.
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* Priority question exercises are becoming an increasingly common tool to frame future agendas in conservation and ecological science. They are an effective way to identify research foci that advance the field and that also have high policy and conservation relevance. * To date, there has been no coherent synthesis of key questions and priority re...
Article
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Numerous environmental and intrinsic biotic factors have been sought to explain patterns in diversity and turnover. Using taxonomically vetted and sampling-standardized data sets of more than 50,000 taxonomic occurrences in the Paleobiology Database (PaleoDB) we tested whether habitat breadth predicts genus durations and diversity dynamics of marin...
Article
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Identifying biological traits that promote evolutionary success is fundamental for understanding biodiversity dynamics and for assessing the evolutionary response of organisms to global change. We tested the hypothesis that image-forming eyes have contributed to the diversification of taxa in the geological past. Using fossil occurrences in the Pal...
Article
Full-text available
Changes in body size have been the subject of numerous palaeontological and neontological studies, but despite several general postulated “rules”, the underlying processes controlling them are still incompletely understood, and their broad applicability is debated. Here we utilise morphological and ecological data from the Jurassic marine bivalve C...
Chapter
Full-text available
Patterns of Phanerozoic global biodiversity continue to be a major focus of palaeobiological research. Recent advances have been fuelled by the establishment of the Paleobiology Database. This new type of data compilation, based on the actual occurrences of taxa in fossil collections, has entailed the development and application of a whole set of n...
Article
Full-text available
Changes in body size have been the subject of numerous palaeontological and neontological studies, but despite several general postulated "rules", the underlying processes controlling them are still incompletely understood, and their broad applicability is debated. Here we utilise morphological and ecological data from the Jurassic marine bivalve C...
Article
Full-text available
On the basis of extensive new field collections we revise the bivalve fauna from the Upper Pliensbachian (Lower Jurassic) of the „Herforder Liasmulde“. We describe and discuss the affinities of 41 bivalve taxa which occur predominantly in claystones („Amaltheenton“). The majority of taxa is either described from the Pliensbachian of the region for...
Article
Full-text available
On the basis of extensive new field collections we revise the bivalve fauna from the Upper Pliensbachian (Lower Jurassic) of the "Herforder Liasmulde". We describe and discuss the affinities of 41 bivalve taxa which occur predominantly in claystones ("Amaltheenton"). The majority of taxa is either described from the Pliensbachian of the region for...
Article
Full-text available
The superbly preserved dinosaurs and associated organisms from the Late Jurassic fossil Lagerstätte Tendaguru in southern Tanzania mark an exceptional success story in palaeontology. The new permanent exhibits of the Museum für Naturkunde in Berlin, highlighting the spectacular dinosaurs (Fig. 1), are telling evidence. In more than 100 years of res...
Article
We present the first modern description of corals, brachiopods and bivalves from the Antalo Limestone in the Mekele Outlier of northern Ethiopia. This fauna is largely of Oxfordian age and lived in shallow sub-tidal environments and in small patch reefs. In combining our new data with fossil occurrence data from the Paleobiology Database, we conduc...
Article
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Previous analyses of the history of Phanerozoic marine biodiversity suggested that the post-Paleozoic increase observed at the family level and below was caused, in part, by an increase in global provinciality associated with the breakup of Pangea. Efforts to characterize the Phanerozoic history of provinciality, however, have been compromised by i...
Article
The well-known Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous Tendaguru Beds of southern Tanzania have yielded fossil plant remains, invertebrates and vertebrates, notably dinosaurs, of exceptional scientific importance. Based on data of the German-Tanzanian Tendaguru Expedition 2000 and previous studies, and in accordance with the international stratigraphic g...
Article
Full-text available
The well-known Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous Tendaguru Beds of southern Tanzania have yielded fossil plant remains, invertebrates and vertebrates, notably dinosaurs, of exceptional scientific importance. Based on data of the German-Tanzanian Tendaguru Expedition 2000 and previous studies, and in accordance with the international stratigraphic g...
Article
Full-text available
It has previously been thought that there was a steep Cretaceous and Cenozoic radiation of marine invertebrates. This pattern can be replicated with a new data set of fossil occurrences representing 3.5 million specimens, but only when older analytical protocols are used. Moreover, analyses that employ sampling standardization and more robust count...
Article
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Marine calcifying organisms that produce sediments and build reefs generally have skeletons and shells that are composed of either aragonite or calcite. Long-term changes in the estimated Mg/Ca ratios of sea water tend to correspond to changes in the prevailing mineralogy of these creatures. High Mg/Ca ratios are expected to favour the spread of ar...
Article
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The visibility of life forms in the fossil record is largely determined by the extent to which they were mineralised at the time of their death. In addition to mineral structures, many fossils nonetheless contain detectable amounts of residual water or organic molecules, the analysis of which has become an integral part of current palaeontological...
Article
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In this work, 238 specimens of the bivalve order Trigonioida have been studied. They belong to the Early to early Middle Jurassic fauna collected at 23 localities of northern Chile, between 21º39’S (II Región de Antofagasta) and 32º25,5’S (V Región de Valparaíso). Thirty-one taxa belonging to 11 genera are described. Three genera, Neuquenitrigonia,...
Article
Full-text available
The Early Jurassic (late Hettangian to early Toarcian) bivalve fauna of the Sierra de Santa Rosa Formation of the Antimonio terrane (Sonora, NW Mexico) is analyzed taxonomically and biogeographically. Fifty taxa are recognized, representing 36 genera and subgenera. Thirty-four of these taxa have not been mentioned from the Jurassic of this region p...
Article
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Aim  To evaluate the influence of geographical distribution on the extinction risk of benthic marine invertebrates using data from the fossil record, both during times of background extinction and across a mass-extinction episode. Total geographical range is contrasted with proxies of global abundance to assess the relationships between the two ess...