Martijn van Leusen

Martijn van Leusen
University of Groningen | RUG · Department of Archaeology

PhD

About

66
Publications
16,619
Reads
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603
Citations
Additional affiliations
May 2002 - present
University of Groningen
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
September 1994 - August 1997
University of Birmingham
Position
  • Leverhulme research fellow
Description
  • worked with Vince Gaffney and Roger White on the Wroxeter Hinterland Project

Publications

Publications (66)
Preprint
Full-text available
Archaeological sites can be discovered and recorded in a high-resolution and non-invasivemanner using geophysical methods. These measure the spatial variation of a range ofphysical properties of the soil which may be representative proxies of the subsurfacearchaeology. Less-invasive and cost-effective field procedures have become top-priority tomit...
Article
Full-text available
JOURNAL OF GREEK ARCHAEOLOGY This article deals with a relatively new form of archaeological research in the Mediterranean region – intensive surface survey, coverage of the landscape by teams walking in close order, recording patterns of human activity visible on the landsurface as scatters of pottery and lithics, or building remains. Since 2000,...
Article
Full-text available
This paper aims to contribute to the improvement of documentation and archiving standards (conforming to the FAIR principles) for systematic Mediterranean archaeological field survey. It reports on the initial stages of work by the authors to build an extension to the CIDOC CRM ontology to accommodate concepts underlying the description of archaeol...
Article
Full-text available
A seguito della sintesi pubblicata sulle indagini archeologiche nel territorio di Sezze, condotte dall'Università di Groningen sotto l'egida del Progetto della Regione Pontina (PRP), questo documento discute la metodologia e i primi risultati di due progetti di ricerca sul campo più recenti nel quadro del PRP, entrambi finanziati dall'Organizzazion...
Chapter
Full-text available
This paper discusses the challenges of archaeological prospection in two common situations in Mediterranean mountain landscapes: rock debris slopes and alluvial basins. Burial by subsequent rockfall episodes provides favourable preservation circumstances on debris slopes, but hinders the detection of archaeological remains. Erosive landscape zones...
Poster
Full-text available
This poster gives an overview of the aims and structure of the SAGA cost action. It details the key aims of the working groups, along with the structure of SAGA and means to fulfill the key deliverables.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Archaeology, like several other disciplines studying the physical landscape, is inherently about three-dimensional data; that is, about physical objects and volumes and their associated properties. Yet our records of this 3D reality have traditionally perforce been reduced to two dimensions, restricting the subsequent analysis to 2D, or at most 2.5...
Article
Full-text available
Archaeological sites can be discovered and recorded in a high-resolution and non-invasive manner using geophysical methods. These measure the spatial variation of a range of physical properties of the soil which may be representative proxies of the subsurface archaeology. Less-invasive and cost-effective field procedures have become top-priority to...
Chapter
Full-text available
This paper discusses the challenges of archaeological prospection in two common situations in Mediterranean mountain landscapes: rock debris slopes and alluvial basins. Burial by subsequent rockfall episodes provides favourable preservation circumstances on debris slopes, but hinders the detection of archaeological remains. Erosive landscape zones...
Article
Full-text available
This paper presents the results of an in-depth multidisciplinary restudy of small Metal Age surface scatters recorded in earlier fieldwalking surveys in northern Calabria (Italy). Guided by a stratified sampling approach based on site types and topographic positions, high-resolution surface collections at the selected sites were combined with geoph...
Book
Full-text available
Understanding how past and current physical landscape processes, both natural and anthropogenic, aff ect the archaeological record has become one of the main aims of the burgeoning fi eld of Geoarchaeology. But the ideal of eff ective multidisciplinary research collaboration is hard to achieve. This second volume of the Raganello Basin Studies seri...
Poster
Full-text available
During the Early Bronze Age, a giant eruption of Mount Vesuvius (Italy) buried a flourishing landscape of villages and fields in the plains to the north and east of the volcano under more than a meter of ash. Inhabitants of the closest sites such as Nola (‘the Bronze Age Pompeii’) could barely escape with their lives. Italian archaeological researc...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This paper presents work carried out in the Rural Life in Protohistoric Italy project (funded by NWO grant 360-61-010), following on from pilot Magnetic Susceptibility studies conducted in our research area in northern Calabria, published last year (Van Leusen, Kattenberg, and Armstrong 2014). We will explore the integration of magnetic susceptibil...
Poster
Full-text available
A major eruption of the Monte Somma Vesuvius (1995+-10 BC) devastated the landscape and the flourishing Early Bronze Age society then occupying the southern part of the region of Campania (Italy). Following an initial small eruption, which is thought to have allowed the population to flee the area, heading inland rather than towards the sea, the so...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This paper presents a methodological view on the way we define “turning points” in Bronze Age communities, and argues that many of our interpretations are influenced by research biases. As a case study, we will present preliminary results from our research in southern Italy. The Rural Life in Protohistoric Italy project of the University of Groning...
Conference Paper
Presented here are results from the non-destructive portable X-ray fluorescence (pXRF) analysis of ceramic artifacts in Italy, Malta, and Croatia, dating to the Neolithic, Chalcolithic, Bronze, and Iron Ages, with a focus on the advantages and limitations of this method of analysis in identifying local vs. non-local pottery, and their “history” of...
Article
Full-text available
In this article we present the research history and current archaeological investigations of an atypical protohistoric settlement in the remote mountain valley of Terra Masseta (Calabria, Italy). Site T115a, occupied between the Late Neolithic and the Iron Age, was discovered in the early 1990’s. In previous years, GIA researchers mapped protohisto...
Article
Full-text available
The Devil is in the Details: a burnt Late Bronze Age hut The Rural Life in Protohistoric Italy project investigates small surface scatters from the Bronze and Iron Age, found during field walking surveys in Calabria, Italy. In this article we argue that detailed, multidisciplinary investigations of such ephemeral sites are crucial for our understan...
Article
This paper presents pilot geophysical investigations carried out in 2005–2006 by the Groningen Institute of Archaeology in northern Calabria, Italy. The aim of this work was to find out if and how surface magnetic susceptibility (MS) measurements might be of use to correct significant visibility biases in the results of earlier large-scale systemat...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The Rural Life in Protohistoric Italy project (2010-2015) investigates small surface sites in a river basin at the southern end of the Apennine range, in northern Calabria. The basin is composed of an (uninvestigated) coastal plain, a foothill zone where most medieval to modern habitation is concentrated, and a mountainous hinterland with peaks ove...
Article
In the past decade (2000-2010), research within the scope of the 'Hidden Landscapes' project by RUG archaeologists provided important information on the Holocene history of the Agro Pontino graben. This information complemented earlier studies by Dutch Universities (UvA, RUG and UL). The graben was found to hold important tephrochronological, palae...
Article
Full-text available
Multidisciplinary research on Late Bronze Age sites in the Contrada Damale (Calabria, Italy) The Rural Life project applies a multidisciplinary approach to the investigation of small protohistoric surface scatters in northern Calabria, Italy. Non-invasive and invasive methods, including field-walking surveys, geophysics, coring and test pits, are u...
Article
Full-text available
Agricultural terraces are geomorphologic features created by humans. These structures protect farming land by reducing soil erosion, they collect water in their hydrological infrastructure, and preserve crops and vegetation. Their construction could however negatively affect underlying soils and archaeology present in those soils. However, if a ter...
Article
Full-text available
This interview covers life and work of Marianne Kleibrink, retired Professor of Classical and Mediterranean Archaeology at the Groningen Institute of Archaeology. For more than 25 years she conducted and published excavations at Timpone della Motta near Francavilla Marittima (northern Calabria) and at Satricum (south Lazio), documenting the indigen...
Article
Full-text available
Deze bundel is een mijlpaal in het onderzoek naar de Oude Middellandse Zee. Met behulp van een vergelijkende aanpak, zijn drie verschillende regionale landschappen van Italië uitvoerig onderzocht door archeologen. Om een zeer gedetailleerd beeld te krijgen van de ontwikkeling van menselijke activiteiten van de late Bronstijd tot de opkomst van het...
Article
Full-text available
In 2009, the GIA dug a trench alongside the Archaic to Roman rural temple sanctuary of Juno at Tratturo Caniò in the ager of Setia in the Pontine plain (Lazio, Italy), in order to investigate the older Bronze and Iron Age remains that had been reported in Italian probing excavations in the mid-1980s. The trench, up to 2 m deep, yielded a wealth of...
Article
Full-text available
The Groningen Institute of Archaeology has conducted field walking surveys in the northern part of the Pontine plain, on the southwestern margins of the Lepine mountains, since 1987. The results of these surveys have only partially been published in accessible journals, and in a number of different formats. Archaeological knowledge and methodology...
Article
Full-text available
My research has shown that the type of regional archaeological data analysis required by landscape archaeological approaches is an area where both theory and method are still in their infancy. High-level theories about the occurrence, scope, and effects of processes such as centralization, urbanization, and Hellenization/Romanization cannot yet be...
Article
Full-text available
This paper provides the overall archaeological context of a geophysical survey carried out at the Roman town at Wroxeter, including both excavation carried out within the town and survey and excavation within its hinterland. The geophysical survey at Wroxeter was carried out within the remit of the Wroxeter Hinterland Project. The archaeological ra...
Article
Accurate mapping of the 78-ha Roman town of Viroconium (modern-day Wroxeter in Shropshire, UK) in preparation for detailed research and site management proved a task that requires the use of modern information techniques. This article describes the creation of high spatial accuracy maps by the use of GPS-located gradiometer survey data in order to...
Article
Both among the general public and among archaeologists there is a widespread belief in the presumed abilities of dowsers to locate underground archaeological features. This article reviews the nature of such beliefs as evidenced in published materials from professional archaeologists in the UK. It is found that there is a contradiction between larg...
Article
Both among the general public and among archaeologists there is a widespread belief in the presumed abilities of dowsers to locate underground archaeological features. This article reviews the nature of such beliefs as evidenced in published materials from professional archaeologists in the UK. It is found that there is a contradiction between larg...
Article
Full-text available
The Wroxeter Hinterland Project is a three-year regional research project employing GIS technology in the planning, management, research and publication of a study of the Iron Age and Roman landscape around the Roman city of Viroconium (Wroxeter) in Shropshire. The use of GIS technology in projects such as this has again highlighted the problems as...
Article
Full-text available
This paper reports on the results of archaeological and geographical field work conducted in 1998 and 1999 by members of the Regional Pathways to Complexity project in the coastal landscape of South Lazio (Italy). The protohistoric (Bronze Age to Archaic) settlement history of this area is dominated by its marginal position with respect to the prot...
Article
Full-text available
Modern field walking surveys have become increasingly labour-intensive both because a higher coverage rate (often with total collection of artefacts) is now thought to be essential, and because more stringent demands are now put on the precision and accuracy of field recording methods. The management and analysis of modern survey data within GIS re...
Article
The Netherlands is one of the few countries in Europe where heritage experts and land developers use predictive modeling to avoid destroying future archaelocial sites, even though many scholars consider the application for this purpose highly controversial. The contributors to Archaeological Prediction and Risk Management offer an overview of the v...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
On 1 November 2011 one of the land owners in my Calabrian (southern Italy) study area found a partial terracotta object, probably Hellenistic in date because of certain associated surface finds, but we were not able to identify what larger terracotta object it might have been part of. Can anyone identify the object, depicted on page 6 of the attached document?

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Projects

Projects (5)
Project
Archaeological sites can be discovered and recorded in a high-resolution and non-invasive manner using geophysical methods. These measure the spatial variation of a range of physical properties of the soil which may be representative proxies of the subsurface archaeology. Less-invasive and cost-effective field procedures have become top-priority to mitigate the destructive effects on our cultural heritage from intensified land use, climate change and the current conflict panorama. At a time when many organisations are investing in advanced geophysical equipment, a major problem is that our ability to fully interpret the information available from geophysical datasets is still very limited. This deficiency prevents geophysical survey moving beyond basic prospection and becoming a significant tool for answering nuanced questions about archaeology and their host landscapes. This limitation arises from an incomplete understanding of the relationship between soil properties and geophysical measurements. Bridging this gap requires multi-disciplinary teams, testing novel methods, plus scholarly discussion to collate the outcomes of projects on this topic. Overcoming these challenges is a prerequisite for maximising the cost-effectiveness of geophysical methods, realising the expected benefits of technological investment and allowing broader utility of geophysical methods in the cultural heritage sector. SAGA will build an international network of geophysicists, archaeologists, soil scientists and other experts to develop our capability to interpret geophysical data and promote research collaborations. Our vision is that after four years, SAGA will have created an environment within which emerging field procedures, enhanced data interpretation and a broader understanding of integrated geophysical methods can flourish.