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Martha Maria Sander

Martha Maria Sander
NABU · Species and Bird Conservation Unit

PhD

About

16
Publications
3,857
Reads
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56
Citations
Citations since 2016
16 Research Items
56 Citations
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Introduction
I am interested in avian ecology, especially the link between breeding ecology and migration, and effects of climate change in alpine systems. I collect and analyse data on Northern wheatear reproduction, survival, seasonal habitat and timing of migration (geolocation).
Additional affiliations
March 2022 - July 2022
Università degli Studi di Torino
Position
  • Stipend
Description
  • Research on alpine bird ecology
October 2018 - March 2022
Università degli Studi di Torino
Position
  • PhD Student
Description
  • PhD Project "The ecology of alpine birds: Linking breeding with migration"
Education
October 2017 - April 2018
Universität Potsdam
Field of study
  • Master Geoecology
October 2014 - September 2017
Universität Potsdam
Field of study
  • Ecology, Evolution und Nature Conservation
October 2011 - September 2014
Universität Potsdam
Field of study
  • Biowissenschaften

Publications

Publications (16)
Article
Climate change is leading to the advancement of spring conditions, resulting in an earlier snowmelt and green‐up, with highest rates of change in highly seasonal environments, including alpine habitats. Migratory birds breeding at high elevations need to time their arrival and lay dates accurately with this advancement, but also with the annually v...
Article
East Asian songbirds are known to migrate along two major corridors: from mainland Eurasia via China to SouthEast Asia, and from Japan and easternmost Russia through chains of islands in the Pacific to Indonesia and the Philippines. We successfully tracked the hitherto unknown migration of a Blue-and-white Flycatcher Cyanoptila cyanomelana breeding...
Article
Mountains support high biodiversity, often including endemic and vulnerable species, but they are also particularly sensitive to climate change. Whilst studies on mountain biodiversity at the species level are common, studies that consider whole assemblages are scarce. We assessed how an alpine bird assemblage varied in terms of ecological habitat...
Article
Full-text available
Timing reproduction to coincide with optimal environmental conditions is key for many organisms living in seasonal habitats. Advance in the onset of spring is a particular challenge to migratory birds that must time their arrival without knowing the conditions on the breeding grounds. This is amplified at high elevations where resource availability...
Preprint
Full-text available
A steady advance in the onset of spring is one of the most prominent footprints of climate warming and requires organisms, including migratory birds, to adapt their annual routines. As lower trophic levels typically adapt faster than higher trophic levels, observations of reduced fitness due to trophic mismatches are becoming more frequent, especia...
Article
Full-text available
Unstructured citizen-science data are increasingly used for analysing the abundance and distribution of species. Here we test the usefulness of such data to predict the seasonal distribution of migratory songbirds, and to analyse patterns of migratory connectivity. We used bird occurrence data from eBird, one of the largest global citizen science d...
Article
Predictions derived from species distribution models (SDMs) are strongly influenced by the spatial scale at which species and environmental data (e.g. climate) are gathered. SDMs of mountain birds usually build on large-scale temperature estimates. However, the topographic complexity of mountain areas could create microclimatic refuges which may al...
Article
Studying phenotypic variations along gradients may provide insights into mechanisms that drive species distributions, and thus can be useful indicators of environmental change. In mountains, the study of phenotypic variation along elevation gradients is of increasing relevance due to impacts of climate change. We analysed European ringing data to m...
Preprint
Studying phenotypic variations along gradients may provide insights into mechanisms that drive species distributions, and thus can be useful indicators of environmental change. In mountains, the study of phenotypic variation along elevation gradients is of increasing relevance due to impacts of climate change. We analysed European ringing data to m...
Poster
Full-text available
La biodiversità delle praterie alpine d’alta quota è minacciata dal cambiamento climatico, il quale provoca un avanzamento verso l’alto della treeline con un notevole impatto negativo sulle specie che si riproducono in questo ambiente. Tali cambiamenti determinano trend popolazionali negativi per molte specie di uccelli migratori a lungo raggio, qu...
Article
In contrast to the rapidly growing body of knowledge on migratory routes, wintering grounds and timing of annual life cycle events of migratory birds, knowledge on how migratory songbirds refuel at stopover sites along the Asian–Australasian flyway has increased only slowly, despite the fact that migrant birds show declining trends along it. We ana...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Overview of the work of the Amur Bird Project in 2018.
Article
Full-text available
Fat loads were quantified for 2125 Yellow-browed Warblers Phylloscopus inornatus trapped at a stop-over site in Far East Russia during autumn migration. Flight ranges of 660–820 km were estimated for the fattest individuals, suggesting that they would need to stop for refuelling at least six times to reach their wintering areas in South East Asia.
Article
Full-text available
Estimating flight ranges of migratory Yellow-browed Warblers Phylloscopus inornatus from a stop-over site in Far East Russia
Article
Handedness is a major trait of humans, generating a measurable directional bilateral asymmetry in the upper extremities. In most cultures, right handedness is genetically more frequent (90%) and socially supported, even if reskilling became unusual. The present anthropometric study was conducted in 2014 with 76 right and 26 left handers born after...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Our study will determine phenology and wintering locations of a Northern wheatear Oenanthe oenanthe population breeding in the Piedmontese Alps, and importantly will link this information to data on breeding demography and nesting habitat. The Northern Wheatear Oenanthe oenanthe is a long-distance migrant, and many populations of this species breed in open habitats at high elevations. Mountainous open habitats are threatened due to climate change (Chamberlain et al., 2013), and the consequent upward treeline shift is likely to impact negatively on the distribution and total area of suitable habitat for species living above the treeline in the Italian Alps (Ferrarini et al., 2017). Indeed, evidence already exists that Alpine breeding Wheatears have undergone a range shift towards higher elevations (Bani et al., 2019). Climate change will also affect the demography and phenology of upland and mountain bird species (Scridel et al., 2018). An additional potential threat to this species is its seasonal migration, as especially long-distance migrants tend to have negative population trends (Kirby et al., 2008). We collect and analyse data on demography (population size, nest productivity, breeding phenology and survival) through territory mapping, nest monitoring and resighting of colour-ringed individuals from a population breeding in the Piedmontese Alps. To describe details of migration, such as dates of departure, stop-over sites, location of the wintering range and arrival dates at high elevation breeding grounds, we attached light-level geolocators to breeding Wheatears for the first time in the Piemont region. In this way, we will obtain a complete picture of the species' life cycle and link this to habitat parameters. Field methods: geolocation, colour-ringing, chick ringing, nest monitoring, territory + habitat mapping, resighting of colour-ringed individuals (survival) Published research: Sander MM, Chamberlain D, Mermillon C, Alba R, Jähnig S, Rosselli D, Meier CM and Lisovski S (2021). Early Breeding Conditions Followed by Reduced Breeding Success Despite Timely Arrival in an Alpine Migratory Songbird. Front. Ecol. Evol. 9:676506. doi: 10.3389/fevo.2021.676506 Sander, M.M. and Chamberlain, D. (2020). Evidence for intraspecific phenotypic variation in songbirds along elevation gradients in central Europe. Ibis, 162: 1355-1362. https://doi.org/10.1111/ibi.12843
Project
The aim of the Amur Bird Project is to study the avifauna along the Amur River – a species-rich and under surveyed area in Far East Russia. We collect data on distribution, ecology and threats of endangered and less-known species and established a long-term monitoring for both breeding birds and migrants. Our voluntary work is based at Muraviovka Park for Sustainable Land Use, a non-governmentally managed nature reserve. Environmental education plays an important part in the project as well. More information: www.amurbirding.blogspot.com www.facebook.com/amurbirdproject/