Marten Boon

Marten Boon
Utrecht University | UU · Department of History and Art History

Doctor of Philosophy
Lecturing History of International Relations. Open to collaborations on energy, environmental and business history

About

22
Publications
2,551
Reads
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51
Citations
Citations since 2016
17 Research Items
48 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022024681012
Introduction
I am a transnational and business historian, working mostly on the post-1870 period, interested in the oil and gas industry, energy transitions, environmental history, economic geography, historical GIS, globalisation, commodity trading companies, tax havens, European and regional history. Member of the "History of Statoil, 1972-2022" project at the University of Oslo (2018-2022), researching and writing a book on the company's history since 2001. Currently lecturer at Utrecht University.
Additional affiliations
April 2015 - July 2018
Norwegian University of Science and Technology
Position
  • PostDoc Position
September 2009 - March 2015
Erasmus University Rotterdam
Position
  • Phd-candidate

Publications

Publications (22)
Chapter
Full-text available
Rising demand for oil in Western Europe prompted major oil companies to study the construction of an integrated Trans-European crude oil pipeline in 1956. Although technically and economically feasible, an integrated pipeline system was never constructed. This chapter questions why the plan failed and evaluates the main causes for its failure. The...
Chapter
Full-text available
Oil is a global industry. It is also an industry in which multinational enterprises and national interests collide more than in most other industries. Although entrepreneurs, managers, and geophysicists primarily developed the oil industry, states have continuously and increasingly played a major role in the industry's globalization. Two primary ev...
Article
Transnational history emerged strongly as globalization intensified in the 1990s, questioning national historiographies and creating new research agendas. Business history has not been part of this, but recent calls within the field to engage more visibly and authoritatively with debates on the history of globalization warrant a closer inspection o...
Book
Statoil, today known as Equinor, was established in 1972 as the Norwegian State Oil Company (det norske stats oljeselskap). This book traces Statoil's history since 2001. The past twenty years of the company's history have been turbulent and transformative. The company's partial privatization in 2001 attuned its management more to investors than to...
Book
[Norsk] Statoils historie etter 2001 har vært turbulent og ført til betydelige endringer i selskapets virksomhet og profil. Delprivatiseringen av selskapet i 2001 gjorde at ledelsen orienterte seg mer mot investorenes forventinger enn mot statlig politikk. Den kraftige stigningen i oljeprisen mellom 2004 og 2014 og fusjonen med Norsk Hydros olje- o...
Book
National competitiveness has become a misnomer, as competitiveness is increasingly understood as a regional phenomenon and regions are not confined to the boundaries of the nation state. This book focuses on the Port of Rotterdam and its hinterland – i.e. the Lower Rhine and the Ruhr area. A transnational perspective is imperative to understand the...
Chapter
World War II caused a major rupture in the Rhine region’s history and econ- omy, leaving the Rhine-Ruhr area, with its huge resource-bound coal, steel and chemical industries, shaken to its core. The subsequent occupation by Allied forces and the simultaneous discovery of huge oil reserves in the Middle East set in motion a major transition from th...
Chapter
Full-text available
This book is based on a research project funded by the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO) entitled Outport and Hinterland. Rotterdam Business and the Ruhr Industry, 1870-2000 (NWO Humanities; Project number 360-53-120). The project aimed to explore the development of the economic links between, on the one hand, the Dutch Port of...
Article
Decarbonization has been identified as necessary to preventing catastrophic climate change, creating a dilemma for the global oil industry. This article examines the industry's reaction to this dilemma and focuses on its historical response to market and governmental regulatory pressure. The article argues that differing national climate policies p...
Book
Multinational Enterprise and Transnational Regions offers an innovative approach to the study of the history of transnational economic regions. The Rhine valley is such a region comprising the cities and areas along the Rhine river and its tributaries. The transition from coal to oil that unfolded between 1945 and 1973 rapidly transformed the regio...
Article
Full-text available
Nationalistic Nazi politics created huge problems for foreign multinational firms in Germany. Business during the Nazi period has been characterised as either state controlled, complacent or complicit. Yet, some cases show that local management had considerable room for manoeuvre and acted primarily with the integrity and long-term interest of the...
Data
Full-text available
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In contrast to many other commodities, crude oil trading is a relatively new phenomenon. The end of the concession system in the 1970s caused the oil value chain to disintegrate and a spot market for crude oil to emerge. Oil traders, in particularly the infamous US oil trader Marc Rich, have been credited with creating this spot market and its subs...
Thesis
Full-text available
The dissertation questions how and why the transition from coal to oil affected the economic relations between the Port of Rotterdam and its German hinterland between 1945 and 1975. From the 1880s onwards, Rotterdam had become the main seaport of the German industrial heartland in the Ruhr area. The transition from coal to oil in the 1950s and 1960...
Article
Full-text available
The energy transition from coal to oil that evolved in Western Europe in the 1950s and 1960s caused the Ruhr coal mining sector to descend into crisis, whilst the Rotterdam port experienced unprecedented growth. The Rotterdam port developed from a transit port for its Rhine-Ruhr hinterland into Europe’s largest oil and petrochemical refining cluste...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
For a conference session at the European Business History Association 2016, I'm looking for scholars interested in the export trade of Soviet and Russian commodities in the 20th century, working on oil, gas, base metals or other commodities. See the call for papers attached.

Network

Cited By

Projects

Project (1)
Archived project
This project led by Prof. Klemann and Dr. Ben Wubs included three PhD-project. These are finished by now. The resulting theses are: 1 Joep Schenk, Havenbaronnen en Ruhrbonzen. Oorsprong van een wederzijdse afhankelijkheidsrelatie tussen Rotterdam en het Ruhrgebied 1870-1914 2 Marten Boon, Oil Pipelines Politics and International Business. The Rotterdam Oil Port, Royal Dutch Shell and the German Hinterland, 1945-1975 3 Klara Paardenkooper, The Port of Rotterdam and the Maritime container. The rise and fall of Rotterdam's hinterland (1966-2010) A final publication giving an overviw of this project will be published next year (2017) by Routledge. For more than a century there was a close link between the German and Dutch economies. Since the 1990s, however, as a result of major structural changes in the Ruhr district this narrow link has become difficult to prove statistically. Between the 1870s and 1990s the two countries often seemed a union in economic matters, which does not mean that the smaller Netherlands was unilaterally dependent on its bigger neighbour however. The German interests in the Netherlands were also enormous, and its dependency on Dutch services was significant. By its political unification in 1871, Germany had become the major power of the continent, while the Ruhr-industry evolved into the industrial heart of Germany. Simultaneously, the Netherlands became economically vital for Germany because the most important industrial centre of North-Western Europe, the Ruhr district, lay immediately over the Dutch border and Rotterdam and its harbours at the Rhine mouth developed into the outports of this most powerful industrial centre. In the late 19th century Germany’s heavy industry became increasingly dependent on foreign raw materials, in particular iron ore. The Germany heavy industry at the river Rhine became highly competitive as freight costs over water declined in comparison to freight costs by railway. As a result, it concentrated more and more around the river Rhine. Simultaneously, the RuhrRotterdamRhine industry. In addition, the growing population of workers needed cheap grain from abroad. Location and facilities made Rotterdam into the most economic harbour for its German hinterland. Transport via the largest Dutch harbour skyrocketed and turned into a vital condition for Germany’s trade and traffic. industry and mines needed an outlet for its finished products and coal. Therefore, Rotterdam evolved into the most important outport of the Rhine industry. In addition, the growing population of workers needed cheap grain from abroad. Location and facilities made Rotterdam into the most economic harbour for its German hinterland. Transport via the largest Dutch harbour skyrocketed and turned into a vital condition for Germany’s trade and traffic. Objective Because Rotterdam has played a key role in the development of the economic Dutch-German dyad over the last one and a half century a closer investigation into the specific role of Rotterdam business and its harbours seems opportune. For the city, the harbour and businesses in and around Rotterdam a historical research project into the origins, the growth and results of recent structural changes of the Dutch-German economic relations – in particular the relations with Ruhr district – is highly recommended. This research therefore aims to explore the development of the economic links between Rotterdam, Rotterdam business and the Rhine mouth harbours on the one hand, and the Ruhr district and Ruhr industry on the other in the course of the 1870-2000 period. Subprojects The project is divided in three subprojects: Coal, Iron Ore and Steel; Rotterdam Business and the German ‘Montan’ Industry, 1870-1940 (Joep Schenk, PhD student); Opting for Oil; Rotterdam’s Oil Harbour and the Move from Coal to Petrochemical Feedstock of the Rhine Industry, 1945-1970 (Marten Boon, Phd student); The Box and Rotterdam’s New Hinterland; The Rise of Container Transport and Globalisation, 1970-2000 (Klara Paardenkooper, Phd student)