Marta Vergara-Martínez

Marta Vergara-Martínez
University of Valencia | UV · Departamento de Psicología Evolutiva y de la Educación

PhD

About

39
Publications
6,657
Reads
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1,218
Citations
Introduction
Marta Vergara-Martínez currently works at the Departamento de Psicología Evolutiva y de la Educación, University of Valencia. Marta does research in Experimental Psychology, Psycholinguistics, Electrophysiology and Developmental Psychology.
Additional affiliations
September 2011 - present
University of Valencia
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
March 2008 - September 2011
University of California, Davis
Position
  • PostDoc Position
January 2000 - December 2008
Universidad de La Laguna

Publications

Publications (39)
Article
Full-text available
A straightforward prediction of the Local Combination Detectors [LCD] model of word recognition (Dehaene et al., 2005) is that letter rotations above 40–45° should disrupt the mapping of the visual input onto orthographic representations. However, the evidence supporting this claim is scarce and not conclusive. To shed light on this issue, we condu...
Article
Although evidence is still scarce, recent research suggests key differences in how deaf and hearing readers use visual information during visual word recognition. Here we compared the time course of lexical access in deaf and hearing readers of similar reading ability. We also investigated whether one visual property of words, the outline-shape, mo...
Article
Full-text available
Recent studies have revealed that presenting novel words across various contexts (i.e., contextual diversity) helps to consolidate the meaning of these words both in adults and children. This effect has been typically explained in terms of semantic distinctiveness (e.g., Semantic Distinctiveness Model, Jones et al., Canadian Journal of Experimental...
Article
Full-text available
Behavioral studies have shown that the legibility of handwritten script hinders visual word recognition. Furthermore, when compared with printed words, lexical effects (e.g., word-frequency effect) are magnified for less intelligible (difficult) handwriting (Barnhart & Goldinger, 2010; Perea et al., 2016). This boost has been interpreted in terms o...
Article
Full-text available
Previous word identification and sentence reading experiments have consistently shown faster reading for lowercase than for uppercase words (e.g., table faster than TABLE). A theoretically relevant question for neural models of word recognition is whether the effect of letter-case only affects the early prelexical stages of visual word recognition...
Article
Full-text available
Prior behavioral experiments across a variety of tasks have typically shown that the go/no-go procedure produces not only shorter response times and/or fewer errors than the two-choice procedure, but also yields a higher sensitivity to experimental manipulations. To uncover the time course of information processing in the go/no-go versus the two-ch...
Article
Full-text available
Previous research has reported that both letter and word identification are slower when the stimuli are presented at rotations above 45° than when presented in their canonical horizontal view. Indeed, influential models of word recognition posit that letter detectors in the visual word recognition system are disrupted by rotation angles above 40° o...
Article
Recent modelling accounts of the lexical decision task have suggested that the reading system performs evidence accumulation to carry out some functions. Evidence accumulation models have been very successful in accounting for effects in the lexical decision task, including the dissociation of repetition effects for words and nonwords (facilitative...
Article
Full-text available
It has been proposed that poor reading abilities in deaf readers might be related to weak connections between the orthographic and lexical-semantic levels of processing. Here we used event related potentials (ERPs), known for their excellent time resolution, to examine whether lexical feedback modulates early orthographic processing. Twenty congeni...
Article
Full-text available
The poor reading skills often found in deaf readers are typically explained on the basis of underspecified print-to-sound mapping and poorer use of spoken phonology. Whilst prior research using explicit phonological tasks has shown that deaf readers can use phonological codes when required, an open question is whether congenitally deaf readers can...
Article
Previous studies suggest that deaf readers use phonological information of words when it is explicitly demanded by the task itself. However, whether phonological encoding is automatic remains controversial. The present experiment examined whether adult congenitally deaf readers show evidence of automatic use of phonological information during visua...
Article
Most words in books and digital media are written in lowercase. The primacy of this format has been brought out by different experiments showing that common words are identified faster in lowercase (e.g., molecule) than in uppercase (MOLECULE). However, there are common words that that are usually written in uppercase (street signs, billboards; e.g...
Article
Behavioral experiments have revealed that words appearing in many different contexts are responded to faster than words that appear in few contexts. Although this contextual diversity (CD) effect has been found to be stronger than the word-frequency (WF) effect, it is a matter of debate whether the facilitative effects of CD and WF reflect the same...
Article
A number of behavioral experiments have revealed that words that appear in many different contexts are responded to faster than words that appear in few contexts. While this contextual diversity (CD) effect has been found to be stronger than the wordfrequency (WF) effect, it is a matter of debate whether or not the facilitative effects of CD and WF...
Article
The examination of how we read handwritten words (i.e., the original form of writing) has typically been disregarded in the literature on reading. Previous research using word recognition tasks has shown that lexical effects (e.g., the word-frequency effect) are magnified when reading difficult handwritten words. To examine this issue in a more eco...
Article
In masked priming lexical decision experiments, there is a matched-case identity advantage for nonwords, but not for words (e.g., ERTAR-ERTAR < ertar-ERTAR; ALTAR-ALTAR = altar-ALTAR). This dissociation has been interpreted in terms of feedback from higher levels of processing during orthographic encoding. Here, we examined whether a matched-case i...
Article
Full-text available
A number of models of visual-word recognition assume that the repetition of an item in a lexical decision experiment increases that item's familiarity/wordness. This would produce not only a facilitative repetition effect for words, but also an inhibitory effect for nonwords (i.e., more familiarity/wordness makes the negative decision slower). We c...
Article
Full-text available
In the masked priming technique, physical identity between prime and target enjoys an advantage over nominal identity in nonwords (GEDA-GEDA faster than geda-GEDA). However, nominal identity overrides physical identity in words (e.g., REAL-REAL similar to real-REAL). Here we tested whether the lack of an advantage of the physical identity condition...
Article
Determining the factors that modulate the early access of abstract lexical representations is imperative for the formulation of a comprehensive neural account of visual-word identification. There is a current debate on whether the effects of case alternation (e.g., tRaIn vs. train) have an early or late locus in the word-processing stream. Here we...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
http://ceur-ws.org/Vol-1347/paper23.pdf
Article
Full-text available
A number of experiments have revealed that matched-case identity PRIME-TARGET pairs are responded to faster than mismatched-case identity prime-TARGET pairs for pseudowords (e.g., JUDPE-JUDPE<judpe-JUDPE), but not for words (JUDGE-JUDGE=judge-JUDGE). These findings suggest that prime-target integration processes are enhanced when the stimuli tap on...
Article
The present study assessed the mechanisms and time course by which orthographic neighborhood size (ON) influences visual word recognition. ERPs were recorded to words that varied in ON and in word frequency while participants performed a semantic categorization task. ON was measured with the Orthographic Levenshtein Distance (OLD20), a richer metri...
Article
Full-text available
Studies from many languages consistently report that subject relative clauses (SR) are easier to process than object relatives (OR). However, Hsiao and Gibson (2003) report an OR preference for Chinese, a finding that has been contested. Here we report faster OR versus SR processing in Basque, an ergative, head-final language with pre-nominal relat...
Article
This article investigates the neural representation of the processes involved in recognizing multisyllabic words in Spanish asking whether lexical and sublexical processes are reflected in a different neuronal activation pattern. High and low frequency words were presented for lexical decision in two different colors. In the congruent condition the...
Article
Full-text available
The goal of the present study was to investigate the electrophysiological correlates of second-language (L2) morphosyntactic processing in highly proficient late learners of an L2 with long exposure to the L2 environment. ERPs were collected from 22 English-Spanish late learners while they read sentences in which morphosyntactic features of the L2...
Article
One key issue for computational models of visual-word recognition is the time course of orthographic and phonological information during reading. Previous research, using both behavioral and event related brain potential (ERP) measures, has shown that orthographic codes are activated very early but that phonological activation starts to occur immed...
Article
In the process of reading compound words, those with high-frequency second constituents are recognized faster than the ones with low-frequency second constituents. However, the role of the first constituent still remains unclear. In the present study, the time course of the frequency effects for both constituents was assessed using Basque compound...
Article
One key issue for any computational model of visual-word recognition is the choice of an input coding scheme for assigning letter position. Recent research has shown that pseudowords created by transposing two letters are very effective at activating the lexical representation of their base words (e.g., relovution activates REVOLUTION). We report a...
Article
Full-text available
To investigate the neural bases of consonant and vowel processing, event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded while participants read words and pseudowords in a lexical decision task. The stimuli were displayed in three different conditions: (i) simultaneous presentation of all letters (baseline condition); (ii) presentation of all letters, exce...
Article
Recent research has shown that pseudowords created by transposing letters are very effective for activating the lexical representation of their base words (e.g., relovution activates REVOLUTION). Furthermore, pseudoword transpositions of consonants are more similar to their corresponding base words than the transposition of vowels. We report one ex...
Article
Full-text available
A number of behavioral studies have suggested that syllables might play an important role in visual word recognition in some languages. We report two event-related potential (ERP) experiments using a new paradigm showing that syllabic units modulate early ERP components. In Experiment 1, words and pseudowords were presented visually and colored so...
Article
A lexical decision experiment was conducted while event related potentials (ERPs) were recorded. The word frequency and the first syllable frequency of each word were manipulated. Results showed that, while high frequency words produced less negative amplitudes in the N400 time window than low frequency words, the inverse pattern was found for syll...
Article
An unresolved issue in second language acquisition is whether and how similarities between L1 and the L2 influence bilingual processing, for example whether the presence of a particular syntactic feature in the L1 allows late learners to more easily acquire this in the L2 and so be able to process this feature in a similar way to that of their firs...

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
A través de un metaanálisis, el equipo ha llegado a la conclusión de que la comprensión de un texto está determinada por el soporte: son más comprensibles los textos en soporte papel que en soporte digital. Consideran que se trata de un fenómeno alarmante, ya que la gran mayoría de los jóvenes utilizan mayoritariamente los formatos electrónicos -como tabletas, e-books o teléfonos inteligentes- y además, se está fomentando el uso de estos dispositivos en los centros educativos. El objetivo del proyecto es comprender las causas que hay tras esa mejor comprensión de los textos en papel y buscar soluciones. Combinarán estudios de campo en colegios e institutos con estudios neurocientíficos de laboratorio, en los que se utilizará la medida de registro de movimientos oculares y el registro electrofisiológico (EEG). Proyecto financiado por la Fundación BBVA: https://www.fbbva.es/equipo/investigacion-neuroeducativa-sobre-el-efecto-de-superioridad-del-papel-neuropapel/
Project
The situation of confinement that the population has lived since the state of alarm was declared on March 14 (in Spain) and on March 9 (in Italy) due to the pandemic caused by COVID-19, has generated important changes in our way of life and habits, including reading.