Marta Rueda

Marta Rueda
Universidad de Sevilla | US · Plant Biology and Ecology

PhD

About

46
Publications
15,961
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1,259
Citations
Citations since 2016
22 Research Items
832 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120140
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120140
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120140

Publications

Publications (46)
Preprint
Full-text available
Ecological theory posits that temporal stability patterns in plant populations are associated with differences in species’ ecological strategies. However, empirical evidence is lacking about which traits, or trade-offs, underlie species stability, specially across different ecosystems. To address this, we compiled a global collection of long-term p...
Article
Analysing temporal patterns in plant communities is extremely important to quantify the extent and the consequences of ecological changes, especially considering the current biodiversity crisis. Long‐term data collected through the regular sampling of permanent plots represent the most accurate resource to study ecological succession, analyse the s...
Preprint
Full-text available
Analysing temporal patterns in plant communities is extremely important to quantify the extent and the consequences of ecological changes, especially considering the current biodiversity crisis. Long-term data collected through the regular sampling of permanent plots represent the most accurate resource to study ecological succession, analyse the s...
Article
Full-text available
More tree species can increase the carbon storage capacity of forests (here referred to as the more species hypothesis) through increased tree productivity and tree abundance resulting from complementarity, but they can also be the consequence of increased tree abundance through increased available energy (more individuals hypothesis). To test thes...
Article
Full-text available
Questions Compensatory dynamics are described as one of the main mechanisms that increase community stability, e.g. where decreases of some species on a year‐to‐year basis are offset by an increase in others. Deviations from perfect synchrony between species (asynchrony) have therefore been advocated as an important mechanism underlying biodiversit...
Article
The stability of ecological communities is critical for the stable provisioning of ecosystem services, such as food and forage production, carbon sequestration, and soil fertility. Greater biodiversity is expected to enhance stability across years by decreasing synchrony among species, but the drivers of stability in nature remain poorly resolved....
Article
Full-text available
The stability of ecological communities is critical for the stable provisioning of ecosystem services, such as food and forage production, carbon sequestration, and soil fertility. Greater biodiversity is expected to enhance stability across years by decreasing synchrony among species, but the drivers of stability in nature remain poorly resolved....
Article
Full-text available
Zoogeographical regions, or zooregions, are areas of the Earth defined by species pools that reflect ecological, historical and evolutionary processes acting over millions of years. Consequently, researchers have assumed that zooregions are robust and unlikely to change on a human timescale. However, the increasing number of human‐mediated introduc...
Preprint
Full-text available
Understanding how the world’s biodiversity is organized and how it changes across geographic regions is critical to predicting the effects of global change ¹ . Ecologists have long documented that the world’s terrestrial fauna is organized hierarchically in large regions - or realms - and continental scale subregions 2–6 , with boundaries shaped by...
Article
Full-text available
Herbivores alter plant biodiversity (species richness) in many of the world’s ecosystems, but the magnitude and the direction of herbivore effects on biodiversity vary widely within and among ecosystems. One current theory predicts that herbivores enhance plant biodiversity at high productivity but have the opposite effect at low productivity. Yet,...
Preprint
Full-text available
Human activity leading to both species introductions and extinctions is widely known to influence diversity patterns on local and regional scales. Yet, it is largely unknown whether the intensity of this activity is enough to affect the configuration of biodiversity at broader levels of spatial organization. Zoogeographical regions, or zooregions,...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding how environmental change alters the composition of plant assemblages, and how this in turn affects ecosystem functioning is a major challenge in the face of global climate change. Assuming that values of plant traits express species adaptations to the environment, the trait-based approach is a promising way to achieve this goal. Never...
Article
Adaptive syndromes and their evolutionary constraints represent a powerful construct for understanding plant distributions. However, it is unclear how the species requirements to face multiple stressors promotes syndrome formation and to which abiotic stressors these syndromes show adaptive value over broad geographic scales. We combined local occu...
Article
Although national forest inventories (NFIs) appeared with the aim of administrate and manage timber resources, its use has been generalised among ecologists. NFIs have been currently proved as very useful tools to understand forest responses to multiple drivers of global change. However, NFIs also allow answering other more fundamental questions in...
Article
Full-text available
Aunque los inventarios forestales nacionales (IFNs) surgieron con la idea de administrar y gestionar recursos madereros, su uso se ha generalizado entre los ecólogos. Actualmente, los IFNs son usados como herramientas muy útiles para entender la respuesta de los bosques a los distintos motores de cambio global. Sin embargo, los IFNs también pueden...
Article
Ecological theory predicts that fragmentation aggravates the effects of habitat loss, yet empirical results show mixed evidences, which fail to support the theory instead reinforcing the primary importance of habitat loss. Fragmentation hypotheses have received much attention due to their potential implications for biodiversity conservation, howeve...
Article
Full-text available
AimThe drivers of tree recruitment over large spatial scales remain unexplored. Here, we ask whether species potential for recruitment and the strength of density-dependent processes, both inferred from species relative abundances, show emerging patterns that can be explained upon the basis of information about climate and functional traits. Locati...
Article
Full-text available
The fossil record has led to a historical explanation for forest diversity gradients within the cool parts of the Northern Hemisphere, founded on a limited ability of woody angiosperm clades to adapt to mid-Tertiary cooling. We tested four predictions of how this should be manifested in the phylogenetic structure of 91,340 communities: (1) forests...
Article
Theory predicts that fragmentation aggravates habitat loss, increasing the extinction threshold of habitat specialists.However, contradictory empirical results have fuelled claims that fragmentation has been overemphasized, and more attention should be given to habitat loss for preserving species. We assess variation in species sensitivity to fores...
Article
Aim When dividing the world into zoogeographical regions, Alfred Russel Wallace stipulated a set of criteria by which regions should be determined, foremost the use of generic rather than species distributions. Yet, recent updates of Wallace’s scheme have not followed his reasoning, probably explain- ing in part the discrepancies found. Using a rec...
Data
Sources used to construct the generic and species nodes of the North American tree phylogeny and the complete phylogeny in Newick format.
Data
Full-text available
High resolution graphical version of the phylogeny of North American trees.
Data
List of tree species, including family ages and trait values.
Article
Vertebrate herbivores can be key determinants of grassland plant species richness, although the magnitude of their effects can largely depend on ecosystem and herbivore characteristics. It has been demonstrated that the combined effect of primary productivity and body size is critical when assessing the impact of herbivores on plant richness of per...
Article
Based on atlas data with a 10-km cell resolution for 1,406 exotic plant species inhabiting Great Britain, we investigate the extent to which arrival time (residence time) and biogeographical origin (climate suitability) are associated with range sizes of exotic plants and how exotic plant richness is related to current climate and the human footpri...
Article
Herein we identified the geographic location of protected areas (PAs) critical for strengthening mammalian conservation in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest Biosphere Reserve (RMBA) by assessing sites of particular importance for mammal diversity using different biodiversity criteria (richness, rarity, vulnerability) and a connectivity index. Although...
Article
Aim To determine if it is possible to generate analytically derived regionalizations for multiple groups of European plants and animals and to explore potential influences on the regions for each taxonomic group. Location Europe. Methods We subjected range maps of trees, butterflies, reptiles, amphibians, birds and mammals to k-means clustering fol...
Article
In fragmented landscapes the relationship between the probability of occurrence of single species and the amount of suitable habitat is usually not proportional, with a threshold habitat level below which the population becomes extinct. Ecological theory predicts that, although the reduction in species’ occurrence probabilities (and eventually the...
Article
Herbivores are expected to influence grassland ecosystems by modifying root biomass and root spatial distribution of plant communities. Studies in perennial dominated grasslands suggest that grazing intensity and primary productivity may be strong determinants of the vertical distribution of subterranean biomass. However, no studies have addressed...
Article
Full-text available
The knowledge of the spatial patterns of species richness and, particularly, of endemic and threatened species at the scale at which management activities take place is crucial for conservation. Yet, detailed descriptions of species' distribution areas are often lacking or incomplete, especially in the tropics. This article focuses on the African i...
Article
How species are distributed in time and space has been a major research theme since the mid-19th century, when biogeographers began dividing the world into floral kingdoms and faunal regions using only their own knowledge of species distributions (Wallace, 1876; Engler, 1879-1882). More recently, the development of quantitative methods together wit...
Article
A major focus of geographical ecology and macroecology is to understand the causes of spatially structured ecological patterns. However, achieving this understanding can be complicated when using multiple regression, because the relative importance of explanatory variables, as measured by regression coefficients, can shift depending on whether spat...
Article
Full-text available
Recent studies addressing broad-scale species richness gradients have proposed two main primary drivers: contemporary climate and evolutionary processes (differential balance between speciation and extinction). Here, we analyze the global richness patterns of two venomous snake clades, Viperidae and Elapidae. We used ordinary least squares multiple...
Article
Knowledge about the factors determining habitat use is especially interesting for herbivores living under seasonal climates as they have to deal with food shortage during the drought season. In this context, different-aged individuals are expected to respond differently to seasonal variations because nutritional requirements and predation risk can...
Article
Different-sized herbivores differ in several aspects from their relationship with food to predation risk whilst foraging. Consequently, the spatial distribution of food, food quality and refuge availability can determine differences in habitat selection by large and small herbivores. In regions under Mediterranean climate, food and water availabili...
Chapter
Full-text available
Beyond their role as primary consumers, herbivore activities can play a key part in spatial processes at the ecosystem level (e.g., McNaughton 1983; McInnes et al. 1992; De Miguel et al. 1997). Environmental factors such as geomorphology, soil and vegetation characteristics, slope, aspect etc., affect the spatial distribution of the resources they...

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