Marta A Jarzyna

Marta A Jarzyna
The Ohio State University | OSU · Department of Evolution, Ecology, and Organismal Biology

Ph.D.

About

42
Publications
20,352
Reads
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3,021
Citations
Introduction
Research interests in Macroecology, Biogeography, Spatial Ecology, Trait Biogeography, Functional Ecology, and Climate Change
Additional affiliations
September 2014 - present
Yale University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
August 2010 - July 2014
Michigan State University
Position
  • Research Assistant
Education
August 2010 - May 2014
Michigan State University
Field of study
  • Department of Fisheries and Wildlife/Ecology, Evolutionary Biology, and Behavior Program
August 2007 - August 2010
Pennsylvania State University
Field of study
  • Department of Geography
September 2004 - January 2005
Aberystwyth University
Field of study
  • Institute of Biological, Environmental, and Rural Sciences

Publications

Publications (42)
Article
Full-text available
The widespread use of species traits in basic and applied ecology, conservation and biogeography has led to an exponential increase in functional diversity analyses, with > 10 000 papers published in 2010–2020, and > 1800 papers only in 2021. This interest is reflected in the development of a multitude of theoretical and methodological frameworks f...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose of Review There is increasing evidence that land use and land cover (LULC) change interacts with climate change to shape biodiversity dynamics. The prevailing hypothesis suggests that generalist species have an advantage in novel climatic and land cover conditions, while specialists are expected to be more sensitive to both stressors (gener...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding patterns and drivers of species distribution and abundance, and thus biodiversity, is a core goal of ecology. Despite advances in recent decades, research into these patterns and processes is currently limited by a lack of standardized, high‐quality, empirical data that span large spatial scales and long time periods. The NEON fills t...
Article
Patterns of species richness along elevation gradients vary with geographic and environmental factors but evidence for similar variation in functional and phylogenetic diversity remains scarce. Here, we provide the most comprehensive evaluation to date of elevational gradients in taxonomic, functional, and phylogenetic diversity of rodents – one of...
Preprint
Full-text available
Butterflies are a diverse and charismatic insect group that are thought to have diversified via coevolution with plants and in response to dispersals following key geological events. These hypotheses have been poorly tested at the macroevolutionary scale because a comprehensive phylogenetic framework and datasets on global distributions and larval...
Article
Rich fossil deposits of the late Quaternary help us understand responses of biodiversity to global change and thus predict the future of ecosystems. Studies from the late Quaternary, however, are often limited taxonomically, geographically (often one site), and by their use of largely taxon‐based metrics that do not inform about ecosystem‐level con...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the drivers of community stability in times of increasing anthropogenic pressure is an urgent issue. Biodiversity is known to promote community stability, but studies of the biodiversity–stability relationship rarely consider the full complexity of biodiversity change. Furthermore, finding generalities that hold across taxonomic group...
Article
Full-text available
It is a critical time to reflect on the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) science to date as well as envision what research can be done right now with NEON (and other) data and what training is needed to enable a diverse user community. NEON became fully operational in May 2019 and has pivoted from planning and construction to operatio...
Preprint
Full-text available
The widespread use of species traits to infer community assembly mechanisms or to link species to ecosystem functions has led to an exponential increase in functional diversity analyses, with >10,000 papers published in 2010–2019, and >1,500 papers only in 2020. This interest is reflected in the development of a multitude of theoretical and methodo...
Preprint
Full-text available
Understanding patterns and drivers of species distributions and abundances, and thus biodiversity, is a core goal of ecology. Despite advances in recent decades, research into these patterns and processes is currently limited by a lack of standardized, high-quality, empirical data that spans large spatial scales and long time periods. The National...
Article
Aim Understanding how ecological communities are assembled remains a grand challenge in ecology with direct implications for charting the future of biodiversity. Trait‐based methods have emerged as the leading approach for quantifying functional community structure (convergence, divergence) but their potential for inferring assembly processes rests...
Article
Full-text available
Mountain systems are exceptionally species rich, yet the associated elevational gradients in functional and phylogenetic diversity and their consistency across latitude remain little understood. Here, we document how avian functional and phylogenetic diversity and structure vary along all major elevational gradients worldwide and uncover strong lat...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This study looks at the rate of feral swine expansion due to their environment and changes in environment over time. Knowing how feral swine expand gives a better look at where they might be found in the future.
Article
The characterization of species’ environmental niches and spatial distribution predictions based on them are now central to much of ecology and conservation, but implicitly requires decisions about the appropriate spatial scale (i.e. grain) of analysis. Ecological theory and empirical evidence suggest that range‐resident species respond to their en...
Article
Full-text available
With the expansion in the quantity and types of biodiversity data being collected, there is a need to find ways to combine these different sources to provide cohesive summaries of species' potential and realized distributions in space and time. Recently, model-based data integration has emerged as a means to achieve this by combining datasets in wa...
Preprint
Full-text available
The drivers of community coexistence are known to vary with environment, but their consistency across latitudes and scales, and resulting conservation implications, remain little understood. Here, we combine functional and phylogenetic evidence along elevations to document strong biotic constraints on coexistence in avian communities in both benign...
Article
Full-text available
Estimates of recent biodiversity change remain inconsistent, debated, and infrequently assessed for their functional implications. Here, we report that spatial scale and type of biodiversity measurement influence evidence of temporal biodiversity change. We show a pervasive scale dependence of temporal trends in taxonomic (TD) and functional (FD) d...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change is driving a pervasive global redistribution of the planet's species. Species redistribution poses new questions for the study of ecosystems, conservation science and human societies that require a coordinated and integrated approach. Here we review recent progress, key gaps and strategic directions in this nascent research area, emp...
Article
Butterflies (Papilionoidea), with over 18,000 described species [1], have captivated naturalists and scientists for centuries. They play a central role in the study of speciation, community ecology, biogeography, climate change, and plant-insect interactions and include many model organisms and pest species [2, 3]. However, a robust higher-level ph...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change is driving a pervasive global redistribution of the planet's species. Species redistribution poses new questions for the study of ecosystems, conservation science and human societies that require a coordinated and integrated approach. Here we review recent progress, key gaps and strategic directions in this nascent research area, emp...
Article
Full-text available
Accurate estimates of historical forest extent and associated deforestation rates are crucial for quantifying tropical carbon cycles and formulating conservation policy. In Africa, data-driven estimates of historical closed-canopy forest extent and deforestation at the continental scale are lacking, and existing modelled estimates diverge substanti...
Article
Assessments of spatial patterns of biodiversity change are essential to detect a signature of anthropogenic impacts, inform monitoring and conservation programs, and evaluate implications of biodiversity loss to humans. While taxonomic diversity (TD) is the most commonly assessed attribute of biodiversity, it misses the potential functional or phyl...
Article
Full-text available
Distributions of Earth’s species are changing at accelerating rates, increasingly driven by human-mediated climate change. Such changes are already altering the composition of ecological communities, but beyond conservation of natural systems, how and why does this matter? We review evidence that climate-driven species redistribution at regional to...
Article
1. The eruption of invasive wild pigs (IWPs) Sus scrofa throughout the world exemplifies the need to understand the influences of exotic and nonnative species expansions. In particular, the continental USA is precariously threatened by a rapid expansion of IWPs, and a better understanding of the rate and process of spread can inform strategies that...
Article
Full-text available
Context Climate change is not occurring over a homogeneous landscape and the quantity and quality of available land cover will likely affect the way species respond to climate change. The influence of land cover on species’ responses to climate change, however, is likely to differ depending on habitat type and composition. Objectives Our goal was t...
Article
Interest in, and opportunities to include functional and phylogenetic attributes of species in community ecology and biogeography are rapidly growing and seen as vital for the assessment of status and trends in biodiversity. However, the fundamental underlying evidence remains the (co-)occurrence of the biological units, such as species, in time an...
Chapter
Macroecology is a statistical investigation of large-scale patterns of species diversity in order to elucidate mechanisms controlling the structure and dynamics of biotas. Though the term “macroecology” was first used in the late 1980s, its foundations were laid much earlier through fields such as biogeography, ecology, and macroevolutionary biolog...
Article
Biodiversity patterns and the mechanisms driving these patterns are inherently scale dependent. Studies investigating biodiversity scaling have focused mostly on evaluating community turnover without taking into consideration its underlying processes of local extinction (hereafter, extinction) and colonization. Our goal was to evaluate the spatial...
Article
Forecasting the consequences of climate change is contingent upon our understanding of the relationship between biodiversity patterns and climatic variability. While the impacts of climate change on individual species have been well-documented, there is a paucity of studies on climate-mediated changes in community dynamics. Our objectives were to i...
Article
Non-spatial regression models are rarely adequate for exploring ecological phenomena, especially in settings where the processes operate at large spatial scales and when model covariates do not explain all variation present in the outcome variable. Given the complexity of ecological processes, it is often unrealistic to assume a set of stationary r...
Article
Full-text available
Biological atlases are a globally widespread and effective means for documenting the distribution of numerous taxa and have been used to study many macroecological relationships. A common assumption when analysing atlas data is that species are detected perfectly (p = 1). This assumption is likely incorrect, but the application of methods to accoun...
Article
In New York State, USA, the abundance of ruffed grouse (Bonasa umbellus) has declined >75% since the 1960s. We hypothesized that range contraction of grouse in New York State was associated with broad-scale spatial patterns relating to forest maturation and that these patterns would be evident at the landscape scale. We evaluated data available fro...
Article
Aim: Biological atlases are a globally widespread and effective means for documenting the distribution of numerous taxa and have been used to study many macroecological relationships. A common assumption when analysing atlas data is that species are detected perfectly (p = 1). This assumption is likely incorrect, but the application of methods to a...

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