Marta Correia

Marta Correia
University of Coimbra | UC · Centre for Functional Ecology - Science for People & the Planet. Department of Life Sciences

PhD Plant Ecology

About

27
Publications
7,547
Reads
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383
Citations
Introduction
Additional affiliations
September 2014 - September 2018
University of Coimbra
Position
  • PhD Student
September 2014 - September 2018
University of Coimbra
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (27)
Preprint
Full-text available
Species interactions can propagate disturbances across space, though ecological and biogeographic boundaries may limit this spread. We tested whether large-scale ecological boundaries (ecoregions and biomes) and human disturbance gradients increase dissimilarity among ecological networks, while accounting for background spatial and elevational effe...
Preprint
Full-text available
The importance of keystone species is often defined based on a single type of interaction (e.g., keystone predator). However, it remains unclear whether this functional importance extends across interaction types. We conducted a global meta-analysis of interaction networks to examine whether species functional importance in one niche dimension is m...
Article
Forests have expanded across Europe over the last centuries as a consequence of farmland (agricultural and pasture) abandonment. Agricultural practices usually increase soil fertility and reduce the diversity and abundance of ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi, essential mutualists of many woody species in temperate and Mediterranean forests. The recovery...
Article
Full-text available
Forest regrowth following farmland (agriculture and pasture) abandonment has been positively associated with a number of processes including the regulation of hydrological cycling, the enhancement of soil functioning, and an increase in forest productivity and carbon (C) sequestration. Although these changes in ecosystem functioning post‐farmland a...
Article
Mutualistic interactions like those established between plants and mycorrhizal fungi or seed dispersers are key drivers of plant population dynamics and ecosystem functioning; however, these interactions have rarely been explored together. We assembled a tripartite fungi–plant–disperser network in the Gorongosa National Park—Mozambique, to test (1)...
Article
Full-text available
Aim Biogeographical comparisons of interaction networks help to elucidate differences in ecological communities and ecosystem functioning at large scales. Neotropical ecosystems have higher diversity and a different composition of frugivores and fleshy‐fruited plants compared with Afrotropical systems, but a lack of intercontinental comparisons lim...
Article
Full-text available
Myrmecochorous plants produce seeds with lipid-rich appendages (elaiosomes) which act as a reward for seed-dispersing ants. Seed dispersal is important for exotic species, which often need to establish new mutualistic interactions in order to colonize new non-native habitats. However, little is known about the importance of elaiosomes for seed remo...
Article
Full-text available
The original version of this Article contained Figshare links in the Code availability statement that were not functional. The correct Figshare links to MATLAB scripts and R code used in this study are https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.4955651 and https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.4836383, respectively. These errors have now been corrected in b...
Article
Seed dispersal and mycorrhizal associations are key mutualisms for the functioning and regeneration of plant communities; however, these processes have seldom been explored together. We hypothesised that obligatory mycorrhizal plants will be less likely to have long-distance dispersal (LDD) syndromes since the probability of finding suitable mycorr...
Article
Full-text available
Species interaction networks are traditionally explored as discrete entities with well-defined spatial borders, an oversimplification likely impairing their applicability. Using a multilayer network approach, explicitly accounting for inter-habitat connectivity, we investigate the spatial structure of seed–dispersal networks across the Gorongosa Na...
Poster
Full-text available
Use of multilayer network analysis to spatial networks - Poster presented at the 3rd Symposium on Ecological Networks (2017), Uppsala, Sweden. Please cite the Nature Communications paper (DOI: 10.1038/s41467-017-02658-y)
Article
Understanding the distribution and diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and the rules that govern AMF assemblages has been hampered by a lack of data from natural ecosystems. In addition, the current knowledge on AMF diversity is biased towards temperate ecosystems, whereas little is known about other habitats such as dry tropical ecosys...
Article
Seed dispersal is a vital step for plant reproduction and long-term vegetation dynamics, and many plants rely on animals for this process. Large animals are disproportionally important dispersers, however they tend to be under a higher extinction risk worldwide. There is compelling evidence that the global biodiversity crisis is leading to the dete...
Article
Full-text available
Invasive plants are hypothesized to have higher fitness in introduced areas due to their release from pathogens and herbivores and the relocation of resources to reproduction. However, few studies have tested this hypothesis in native and introduced regions. A biogeographical approach is fundamental to understanding the mechanisms involved in plant...
Conference Paper
The reproductive biology of exotic species affects their capacity to become naturalized and invasive in non-native areas. Selfing is a common trait in many invasive plants because it provides reproductive assurance under low availability of pollination vectors and sexual partners. Nonetheless, the predominantly self-incompatible Australian Acacia s...
Article
Full-text available
The reproductive biology of exotic species affects their capacity to become naturalised and invasive in non-native areas. Selfing is a common trait in many invasive plants probably because it provides reproductive assurance under low availability of pollination vectors and sexual partners. Nonetheless, the predominantly self-incompatible Australian...
Article
Full-text available
Reproductive traits are crucial for the establishment and maintenance of populations in new areas, and therefore for the invasion process. This work aimed to study the reproductive biology of four aggressive invasive Australian Acacia spp. in Portugal. Fruit and seed set, seed weight and germinability, and seedling growth were assessed for self- an...
Article
Full-text available
Plant–soil feedbacks can exacerbate competition between invasive and native species, although the net effect of the interaction between soil biota and competition is likely to be species-specific. Very few studies have addressed the combined effect of soil and competition on plant performance and invasion by exotic woody species. This study explore...
Poster
Full-text available
Plant-plant interactions might be modulated by soil biota, and therefore, the outcome of the interaction between two species might change depending on soil type. Invasive species can change soil conditions establishing positive feedbacks that contribute to invasion and impair native plant growth. Acacia dealbata is one of the most invasive species...

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