Marry-Anne Karlsen

Marry-Anne Karlsen
University of Bergen | UiB · Stein Rokkan Centre for Social Studies

About

7
Publications
358
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48
Citations
Introduction
Skills and Expertise

Publications

Publications (7)
Book
Full-text available
This edited volume approaches waiting both as a social phenomenon that proliferates in irregularised forms of migration and as an analytical perspective on migration processes and practices. Waiting as an analytical perspective offers new insights into the complex and shifting nature of processes of bordering, belonging, state power, exclusion and...
Chapter
In Norway, an egalitarian welfare approach has, in theory, implied that migrants should have the same formal rights to welfare as every other citizen and that the migrants’ needs for welfare services should mainly be covered by the ordinary workings of regular welfare state institutions. However, the adherence to egalitarian norms from within have...
Article
Full-text available
Økt tilstrømming av mennesker med flukt- og innvandringsbakgrunn har aktualisert behovet for kunnskap om virkningsfulle integreringstiltak. I de senere årene har bruk av ordinært arbeidsliv fått økt oppmerksomhet innen integreringsfeltet. Tiltak som bruker ordinær arbeidsplass som opplærings- og kvalifiseringsarena er imidlertid svært forskjellige,...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (3)
Archived project
The WAIT project used theories of temporality and the concept of 'waitinghood' as tools for producing new and critical insights into the cultural conditions and implications of migration. 'Waitinghood' is about the condition of prolonged waiting, uncertainty and temporariness which is characteristic of irregular migration. WAIT investigated how temporal structures related to irregular migration are shaped by legal regimes, cultural norms and power relationships, and how they shape subjective experiences and life projects. The project focused on four European migration-hubs, notably Oslo (Norway), Stockholm (Sweden), Marseille (France) and Hamburg (Germany).
Project
The WAIT project used theories of temporality and the concept of 'waitinghood' as tools for producing new and critical insights into the cultural conditions and implications of migration. 'Waitinghood' is about the condition of prolonged waiting, uncertainty and temporariness which is characteristic of irregular migration. WAIT investigated how temporal structures related to irregular migration are shaped by legal regimes, cultural norms and power relationships, and how they shape subjective experiences and life projects. The project focused on four European migration-hubs, notably Oslo (Norway), Stockholm (Sweden), Marseille (France) and Hamburg (Germany).