Marni LaFleur

Marni LaFleur
University of San Diego | USD · Department of Anthropology

Doctor of Philosophy

About

32
Publications
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625
Citations
Introduction
I'm interested in the evolution of the unusual traits found in lemurs, in addition to the biology, ecology, and conservation of Madagascar's mammals and forests.
Additional affiliations
January 2013 - April 2015
University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (32)
Article
Full-text available
There is evidence to suggest that the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic may hamper our achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Here, we use non-human primates as a case study to examine the impacts of COVID-19 on the ability to achieve biodiversity conservation and management sustainability targets. We collected data thr...
Article
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Tuberculosis (TB) is an ancient disease affecting a plethora of domestic and wild animals, including humans. In primates, TB can cause severe multisystemic disease. The prevalence of TB in lemurs within Madagascar is unknown; the most recent documented case occurred in 1973 (1). Reverse zoonotic transmission of TB can occur when nonhuman primates a...
Poster
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Madagascar has several tourist facilities with translocated lemurs. Indri and sifaka are popular with tourists but have notoriously low survival outside of the habitats where they occur. We used social media to determine the types of interactions people engage in with these Critically Endangered animals, and to understand the number and turn over t...
Article
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Primates are extracted from the wild for the pet trade across the world. In Madagascar, lemurs are kept as illegal pets and an understanding of lemur pet ownership at the national level is lacking. In 2013 and 2016, we undertook a national survey in 11 of Madagascar's 22 administrative regions (n = 28 towns) with 1,709 households. To our knowledge,...
Article
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Lemur catta is the most reported illegal captive lemur. We document 286 L. catta that were held in illegal captive conditions in Madagascar. Coastal tourist destinations are “hot spots” for sightings. Many of the L. catta reported were in businesses (49%) and were perceived to be held captive for the purpose of generating income (41%). Infant/juven...
Article
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Content shared on social media platforms can impact public perceptions of wildlife. These perceptions, which are in part shaped by context (e.g. non-naturalistic setting, presence of a human), can influence people’s desires to interact with or acquire wild animals as pets. However, few studies have examined whether this holds true for wild animals...
Article
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Non-human primates harbor zoonotic pathogens including the ra- bies virus (Rabies lyssavirus). Though the chances of rabies trans- mission from primates is low, guidelines currently recommend a post-exposure prophylaxis for unvaccinated persons. In Madagas- car, lemurs have been described as carriers of the rabies virus, but a discussion about the...
Article
As with many other species in the primate order, ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta) are threatened with extinction. Our articles documented declines in wild ring-tailed lemur populations and noted that fewer than 2,500 wild ring-tailed lemurs are known to persist in 32 [Gould and Sauther: Primate Conservation 2016; 30: 89-101] and 34 [LaFleur et al.:...
Article
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Primates are kept as pets for various reasons including as indicators of wealth. Ownership of primates can also be influenced by religion. In Madagascar, thousands of lemurs are kept as pets, but the roles of wealth and religion in the ownership of captive lemurs have not been explored. We use quantitative and qualitative data to examine these aspe...
Article
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The live capture of parrots is causing increasing concern across Africa. In Madagascar, home to three species of parrot (Coracop-sis nigra, C. vasa, Agapornis canus), no study has examined how these species are being extracted from the wild and traded. In this study, we examined the procurement, length of ownership, and the end of ownership of pet...
Chapter
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Camera traps, or remotely triggered cameras, are a valuable tool for primatologists, as they can provide a plethora of insights into primate ecology, without the necessity of having researchers continuously present for observation. Camera traps can provide surprising or new information about a species and can also be used to inform conservation pol...
Article
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Correspondence: We call for urgent action to increase government effectiveness in fighting Madagascar’s illegal trade in live lemurs (see go.nature. com/2i6hvor). More funding is needed to investigate the issue, its extent and the factors behind it. Facilities to rehabilitate confiscated lemurs must be improved, and more international non-governme...
Article
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Lemurs are the most threatened group of mammals on earth. Lemur catta (ring-tailed lemur) represents one of the most iconic lemur species and faces numerous an-thropogenic threats in the wild. In this study, we present population estimates from 32 sites across the range of L. catta , collected from primary and secondary data sources, to assess the...
Article
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Although Lemur catta persists in many habitat types in southern Madagascar, its ecology has been primarily studied within gallery forests. We compare plant food selection and properties for ring-tailed lemurs in the spiny and gallery forests over the synchronized lactation period (September to March) that includes both the dry and wet seasons. We f...
Article
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The spiny forest ecoregion of southern and southwestern Madagascar is characterized by low annual rainfall, high temperatures, short-stature xeric vegetation and lack of canopy. Lemur catta is often the only diurnal primate persisting in this habitat. For reproductive females living in spiny forests, gestation and early-to-mid lactation periods occ...
Article
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Effective conservation and management of primates depend on our ability to accurately assess and monitor populations through research. Camera traps are proving to be useful tools for studying a variety of primate species, in diverse and often difficult habitats. Here, we discuss the use of camera traps in primatology to survey rare species, assess...
Article
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COMMENTARY: LETTERS - BOOKS - POLICY FORUM - EDUCATION FORUM - PERSPECTIVES (edited by Jennifer Sills).
Data
Scientists at the University of Colorado and the University of Toliara, Madagascar have discovered that some ring-tailed lemurs in Madagascar regularly retire to limestone chambers for their nightly snoozes, the first evidence of the consistent daily use of the same caves and crevices for sleeping among wild lemurs.
Article
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The most threatened mammal group on Earth, Madagascar's five endemic lemur families (lemurs are found nowhere else) (1), represent more than 20% of the world's primate species and 30% of family-level diversity. This combination of diversity and uniqueness is unmatched by any other country—remarkable considering that Madagascar is only 1.3 to 2.9% t...
Data
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This is the Supplementary Material to our "Policy Forum" contribution, "Averting Lemur Extinctions amid Madagascar's Political Crisis".
Article
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Ring - tailed lemurs live in a range of habitats in southwestern Madagascar. To date, much of the knowledge of ring - tailed lemur ecology, biology and behavior come from riverine gallery forests sites. Recent years have seen an expansion of comprehensive research on this resilient species, including areas of limestone spiny forest along Madagascar...
Article
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Cathemerality consists of discrete periods of activity during both the day and night. Though uncommon within Primates, cathemerality is prevalent in some lemur genera, such as Eulemur, Hapalemur, and Prolemur. Several researchers have also reported nighttime activity in Lemur catta, yet these lemurs are generally considered "strictly diurnal". We u...
Thesis
Full-text available
Lemurs are an ancient, extant primate radiation and have a number of traits (e.g. female dominance, low basal metabolic rate, weaning synchrony, cathemerality) which are unusual when compared to other primates, or even other mammals. The Energy Conservation Hypothesis (ECH) posits that the lemur traits are part of an adaptive complex selected to en...
Article
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In January 2005, a cyclone hit southern Madagascar, including the Beza Mahafaly Special Reserve, disrupting the flowering/fruiting cycle of Tamarindus indica, leaving Lemur catta without its major food resource during reproductive periods. We studied two adjacent groups of L. catta during the late gestation period, and both groups ventured outside...

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