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Marlenne A. Rodriguez

Marlenne A. Rodriguez
Arthur Rylah Institute for Environmental Research

Doctor of Philosophy

About

20
Publications
8,377
Reads
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309
Citations
Introduction
I'm a biologist by profession. I've been working on island restoration & ecology since 2003. I'm a bird lover. I recently finish my PhD at Deakin University in Melbourne, Australia. My research project involved Australasian Gannets, GPS tracking and accelerometry, geolocation, foraging ecology and stable isotopes.
Additional affiliations
March 2014 - present
Deakin University
Position
  • PhD Student
March 2014 - July 2019
Deakin University, Burwood Campus
Position
  • PhD Student
August 2013 - February 2014
Costasalvaje, A.C.
Position
  • GIS Technician
Description
  • Development of a GIS for the Vizcaino Biosphere Reserve
Education
August 2006 - August 2009
Institute of Ecology INECOL
Field of study
  • Ecology
August 1999 - December 2003

Publications

Publications (20)
Article
Full-text available
Stable isotope analyses, particularly of carbon (δ 13 C) and nitrogen (δ 15 N), are used to investigate ecological relationships among species. For marine predators, research has shown the main factors influencing their intra-specific and intra-individual isotopic variation are geographical movements and changes in the composition of diet over time...
Article
Full-text available
Feral Cats (Felis catus) impact native wildlife species through direct predation and transmission of parasites. In July 2018, the Government of Victoria declared Feral Cats to be a pest in specific Crown land tenures and subsequently made changes to regulations to provide opportunity for use of additional control tools. This coincided with an Austr...
Article
Full-text available
When the consequences of sociality differ depending on the state of individual animals and the experienced environment, individuals may benefit from altering their social behaviours in a context‐dependent manner. Thus, to fully address the hypotheses about the role of social associations it is imperative to consider the multidimensional nature of s...
Article
Full-text available
Foraging is a behaviour that can be influenced by multiple factors and is highly plastic. Recent studies have shown consistency in individual foraging behaviour has serious ecological and evolutionary implications within species and populations. Such information is crucial to understand how species select habitats, and how such selection might allo...
Article
Animal diets often vary according to age, sex, experience and/or individual preferences, which, when maintained over time, can lead to behavioural consistency and individual specialisations within populations. In addition, behavioural and dietary similarity within breeding pairs confers reproductive benefits in some species. We investigated inter-...
Thesis
This study reports behavioural consistency in Australian gannets, and give insights about its potential drivers. It contributes with the understanding of resource partitioning among individuals, crucial information for the conservation of this species. Also, it reveals ecological opportunity as a major component for foraging specialisations develop...
Article
Social foraging behaviours, which range from cooperative hunting to local enhancement, can result in increased prey capture and access to information, which may significantly reduce time and energy costs of acquiring prey. In colonial species, it has been proposed that the colony itself may act as a site of social information transfer and group for...
Article
Full-text available
Sexual size dimorphism is widespread throughout seabird taxa and several drivers leading to its evolution have been hypothesised. While the Australasian Gannet (Morus serrator) has previously been considered nominally monomorphic, recent studies have documented sexual segregation in diet and foraging areas, traits often associated with size dimorph...
Article
Full-text available
The Savannah sparrow of San Benito (Passerculus sandwichensis sanctorum) is an endemic subspecies of San Benito's archipelago which is listed by the Nom-059-Semarnat-2010 as an endangered subspecies. It has never been studied before. We describe its reproductive biology in the archipelago, and compared with the reproductive success among the popula...
Article
Full-text available
Caution for the indiscriminate conversion of the isotopic niche into ecologic niche was recently advised. We tested the utility of the isotopic niche to answer ecological questions on oceanic islands. We compared the isotopic niches of black rats (Rattus rattus) on two islands in the Gulf of California, Mexico: Farrallón de San Ignacio (FSI) and Sa...
Chapter
Full-text available
On Mexican islands, 20 island endemic species and subspecies of vertebrates have gone extinct in the last 100 years; all but four of these extinctions were caused by invasive mammals. To prevent more extinctions, 49 populations of 12 invasive mammals were eradicated from 30 Mexican islands. These actions protected 202 endemic taxa – 22 mammals, 31...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In the Gulf of California, Mexico, several islands have been severely impacted by introduced rats (Rattus spp.). A rat eradication project for Farallón de San Ignacio and San Pedro Mártir islands, both globally important seabird colonies, unfolded from planning and baseline studies in 2005 to implementation in 2007. Rats were eradicated via aerial...
Article
Full-text available
Islands harbor a disproportionate amount of the earth's biodiversity, but a significant portion has been lost due in large part to the impacts of invasive mammals. Fortunately, invasive mammals can be routinely removed from islands, providing a powerful tool to prevent extinctions and restore ecosystems. Given that invasive mammals are still presen...
Data
Full-text available
Comisión Nacional de Áreas Naturales Protegidas, 2005. “Estudio Previo Justificativo para el establecimiento de la Reserva de la Biosfera Islas del Pacífico de California”. México, D.F., pp. 169 + 3 anexos. Las islas situadas en el Océano Pacífico de la Península de Baja California son reconocidas internacionalmente por su alta diversidad y abunda...
Article
Full-text available
The introduction of goats in the 19th century to the Guadalupe Island seriously devastated its cypress forest. The island, located 260 km offshore the Baja California peninsula in the Pacific ocean, had a reduction of the forested area from 4,000 to 160 hectares. With the eradication of goats, the forest is no longer threatened, and its regeneratio...

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