Marleen Dieleman

Marleen Dieleman
National University of Singapore | NUS ·  Department of Strategy and Policy

PhD

About

43
Publications
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Introduction
Marleen Dieleman is an Associate Professor at NUS Business School in Singapore. Her research focuses on family business groups and non-market strategy in Asia.

Publications

Publications (43)
Article
This study addresses multiple‐principal–agent power dynamics in state‐owned enterprises (SOEs) in emerging markets. We investigate under what conditions agents (CEOs) accede to demands of government‐linked principals. Our qualitative study in Indonesia advances agency theory by disaggregating and categorizing government‐linked principals. We also e...
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Family business is a growing scholarly field that has recently seen calls to investigate different types of family businesses and connect more clearly with adjacent disciplines. We take up these challenges in this De Gruyter Handbook of Business Families by expanding our reach beyond the single-family with a single business. We investigate business...
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We revisit the emerging construct of business families as it is being used by four different strands of family business scholarship: the family behind the firm, the entrepreneurial family with a portfolio of activities, the governance of business families, and the role of business families in society. For each of these streams we suggest future res...
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This special issue on Teaching Innovations in the Field of International Business systematically explores the nature of teaching innovations and their impact. Featuring articles from the finalists of the 2021 Teaching Innovation Award organized by the Teaching and Education Shared Interest Group at Academy of International Business as well as a con...
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Teaching innovations in the field of higher education (HE) have the potential to lead to better learning outcomes and higher faculty motivation. While the pedagogy literature has explored different types of teaching innovations, International Business (IB) scholars have paid relatively little attention to how these innovations are disseminated and...
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Institutions are vital for solving collective action problems and enabling functioning markets. Based on this notion, the institutional voids literature has offered a dynamic research agenda for international business scholarship. In this perspective article, we leverage work from political science, development economics, legal studies, and anthrop...
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Multinational companies have been a force for good but, unfortunately, some misbehave. Our comprehensive literature review on multinationals’ misbehavior reveals three ideas. First, most research focuses on the interaction between the multinational and its institutional context, but insights vary depending on whether the drivers of misbehavior lie...
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https://theconversation.com/the-future-of-the-family-business-4-strategies-for-a-successful-transition-156191
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Family values are argued to enable ethical family business conduct. However, how these arise, evolve, and how family leaders articulate them is less understood. Using an ‘identity work’ approach, this paper finds that the values underpinning identity work: (1) arise from multiple sources (in our case: religion, culture and sustainability), (2) evol...
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This study sheds more light on the ‘ability-willingness paradox’, which argues that family firms may be more able but less willing to engage in innovation. Using a longitudinal case study, we investigate the influence of family governance attributes during different stages of innovation and suggest that family entrepreneurship facilitates the conve...
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What conditions must be present for multinational companies (MNCs) to benefit from corruption? We argue that corrupt acts by organizations can be profitable if four conditions are met: there must be an opportunity to do so, the risks must be perceived as low, the organization must be willing to engage in corruption, and it must have some skill in c...
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We advance the resource dependence literature on appropriation of organizational resources by powerful partners, focusing on political ties. Using a unique emerging market case of a venture with political ties, we advance theory by unpacking how political connections can hurt the organization by increasing the permeability of organizational boundar...
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Teaching Case Abstract The Tan Group began as a small construction company in the aftermath of World War II. It made its name in hotels and grew into a well-known property company in Indonesia. But it struggled during and after the Asian crisis of 1998 and experienced nearly two lost decades. Four siblings of the third generation took control of th...
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We investigate the internationalization of firms with ownership links to the state from the perspective of resource dependence theory, and argue that internationalization can reduce dependence on the home country government, but, paradoxically, this strategy also creates additional dependences, shifts the power balance, and provides rationales for...
Chapter
Purpose-The purpose of this chapter is to explore the role of the home country government in the internationalization of multinationals from emerging markets. This is an important topic because governments play a greater role in BRIC countries. We build upon the literature on nonmarket strategy, extending this to emerging market multinationals. Met...
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We use and extend resource-dependence theory by analyzing how loosely-coupled organizational structures facilitate the management of political ties by business groups in emerging economies. This topic is particularly salient because business groups are a prevalent organizational form in these countries where they face both a high dependence on gove...
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Some countries produce more multinational enterprises (MNEs) than others. India and China, in particular, have produced a number of dynamic MNEs whose success abroad generates important economic benefits for the home economy. Motivated by this observation, we describe the internationalisation record of Indonesia's major business groups. Using an ar...
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This article explores how private sector players in new town development in Indonesia have worked around, shaped and replaced urban governance and planning institutions, effectively re-negotiating the boundaries between public and private sector. While most literature views urban development from the perspective of the state, this article complemen...
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This paper examines the effect of external shocks on corporate strategy of ethnic Chinese business groups in the context of Indonesia. It reports on an in-depth, longitudinal, and comparative case study of four prominent Indonesian Chinese groups, all of which implemented major strategic changes in response to the Asian financial crisis. As theorie...
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We investigate whether large family groups in emerging economies can proactively change their environment. We use a coevolutionary approach, which accounts for the influence of context on the entrepreneur and for the freedom of the latter to modify it. We find that entrepreneurs can shape institutions to their advantage, illustrated by the Salim Gr...
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We argue that diversification can partly be explained by means of a novel concept, "economies of connectedness", denoting personal relationships of the owners that are used to add new businesses to an otherwise diversified portfolio. Economies of connectedness is a concept that complements those of cronyism and corruption, which by definition are i...
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The Rhythm of Strategy provides a richly documented analysis of the Salim Group, one of the largest family conglomerates in Southeast Asia. Set up by Liem Sioe Liong, a Chinese emigrant, the Salim Group evolved from a small trading venture in colonial Java into one of the largest diversified businesses on the Asian continent. While the Salim Group...
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Many theoreticians search for balance or optimal mix so as to cope with the many 'either-or' dilemmas in organizations. This paper offers some early evidence that a more useful response may lie in oscillation between the opposing poles of dilemmas and that these oscillatory patterns are more effi-caciously adaptive if they are irregular. It also ar...
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This case describes the rise and fall of the Salim Group, a large Asian family business conglomerate based in Indonesia with a turnover of US$20 billion prior to the Asian financial crisis. During the Asian crisis, the diversified and international Salim Group was barely able to survive. The present CEO and president, Anthony Salim, was faced with...
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As institutional transitions in emerging economies intensify, the basis for competition is theorised to move from relationship-based to market-based. An in-depth analysis of the strategy of the Salim Group, one of the largest ethnic Chinese conglomerates in the Asia-Pacific region, supports the view that the strategy of this conglomerate can be und...
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Family business groups are ubiquitous in most emerging markets. This book provides a richly documented analysis of the strategy of the Salim Group, one of the largest family conglomerates in Southeast Asia. It argues that the strategy of this group oscillated irregularly between a business model built on connections and a professional business mode...

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