Markus Wernli

Markus Wernli
The Hong Kong Polytechnic University | PolyU · School of Design

Doctor of Philosophy
Working on design-led, collaborative economies to 'food-enable' the city and foster resourcefulness.

About

20
Publications
5,354
Reads
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44
Citations
Citations since 2016
19 Research Items
43 Citations
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201620172018201920202021202202468101214
201620172018201920202021202202468101214
201620172018201920202021202202468101214
Introduction
Markus Wernli’s work sits in the activist space between social design, education, and restorative practices. His research is concerned with the facilitation of future-opening, collective scenarios as means of engaging with the ‘craft of daily life’ for joint learning, explorative methods, and social innovation. Of particular interest here is how traditional resource cultivating models can be contemporized for bolstering adaptation capacities and critical leadership via skillful practices.
Additional affiliations
February 2015 - January 2020
The Hong Kong Polytechnic University
Position
  • PhD Student
January 2012 - December 2014
Australian National University
Position
  • Designer

Publications

Publications (20)
Chapter
Full-text available
For over a decade, IASDR Workshops have provided an excellent opportunity for designers of all genres to build connections and crossovers between disciplines, communities, education, research, and practice. The following workshops thus probe key issues, topics, and prospects in the eclectic field of design. Within the conference theme ‘[ _ ] With D...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Are you engaged in a commons-related project – past, present, or future – or do you want to integrate commoning into a project? This workshop is a supportive space for conference participants engaged with the commons to explore how they conceptualize and communicate the commons internally and externally. The workshop will focus on critiquing and ad...
Chapter
Full-text available
In recent years, citizen designers have been working with urban communities on the ecological reuse of human waste. In this commoning effort, practitioners reclaim body-expelled resources for exploring the metabolically enabled household as a networked site of radical, co-productive transitions that harnesses nutrients and boosts local value chains...
Article
Full-text available
This article is an invite to re-envision the future together. An invitation that extends beyond that small segment of privileged few who have com- monly dominated decision-making and paradigm. Truly collective imaginaries would listen to and account for successive generations, encompassing their desires, purpose, and aspirations. Here making, knowi...
Chapter
Full-text available
In recent years, citizen designers have been working with urban communities on the ecological reuse of human waste. In this commoning effort, practitioners reclaim body-expelled resources for exploring the metabolically enabled household as a networked site of radical, co-productive transitions that harnesses nutrients and boosts local value chains...
Article
Full-text available
This paper explores the transformative relations of unknowable possibility in three urban communities which upcycle human waste. Working with communities – human and nonhuman – is approached by applying the dynamic model of collective wondering conceived as (i) provisional proposition, (ii) responsiveness to difference, and (iii) affirmation in/of...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This paper compares three interventionist eco-sanitation cases by applying a structurally extended SWOT matrix for evaluating their transformative relations and capabilities in their respec-tive urban settings of the global north. The enablers and barriers underlying these human waste cycling communities are assessed by combining qualitative-quanti...
Article
Full-text available
This report is about an explorative co-crafting course applying the notion of recursive publics to adult learning and pro-environmental activation, which aimed to engage a diverse cohort of learners towards patterns of eating, living, and engaging that promoted wellbeing and a healthy environment. This two-month-long, university-endorsed study in H...
Article
Full-text available
This position paper seeks to address the operational logic that created the conditions for the pandemic to take hold. Grasping the crisis as an opportunity for an anthropological inquiry across disciplines, this exploration firmly anchors design inside the social commitment required by breathing bodies and life-enabling atmospheres. By infusing the...
Chapter
Full-text available
Culture, Community and Climate: conversations and emergent praxis is a collection of essays and conversations representing a diverse array of voices, cultures, backgrounds and disciplines. But everyone who contributed to this book has something in common: they all care for the future of our planet. All explore different ways in which their mode of...
Thesis
Full-text available
This research investigates how attending to the basic needs of human bodily existence is mobilizing transpersonal abilities that promote integrative flourishing. Rearranging human-environment arrangements begins with adept ways of self-regulation in daily life that require bodily engagement, courage, and failure tolerance. Such adventurousness is t...
Chapter
Full-text available
In a somewhat speculative, participatory study we tried to design a consequential entanglement between people and plants. “We” refers to a PhD student (the fermentation enthusiast) and a product designer (the horticulture enthusiast) and 22 plant-loving participants. Over two months in spring 2017 we practically explored our personal role in bio-ma...
Chapter
Full-text available
In spring 2017 we branched with the maker space Dim Sum Labs into the field of domestic horticulture in close collaboration with microbiologists, agro-ecological tinkerers and 22 indoor planting enthusiasts to enter a three-month long experimentation of co-biohacking and co-learning. The basic goal was to enable our participants so that they could...
Article
Full-text available
Since 2015, the Research Institute of Organic Treasures (R.I.O.T.) has combined fermentation practices and social experimentation in Hong Kong to give biological byproducts from human and urban metabolisms a regenerative purpose. Here putrescible wastes emitted from our kitchens, toilets, and bodies are considered our most foundational design mater...
Article
Full-text available
During storage of urine, urea is biologically decomposed to ammonia, which can be lost through volatilization and in turn causes significant unpleasant smell. In response, lactic acid fermentation of urine is a cost-effective technique to decrease nitrogen volatilization and reduce odour emissions. Fresh urine (pH = 5.2–5.3 and NH4+-N = 1.2–1.3 g L...
Experiment Findings
Full-text available
Conference Paper
Full-text available
What are ethical and species-affirming approaches for how humans, can relate to you, the fermenting Lactobacilli? In pursuit of this question, you, the single-cellular life forms inside living machines and bio-artistic events are invited to join the animal party! Just because human animals neither have the sensorium nor the empathy to grasp your li...
Book
Full-text available
Mirei Shigemori (1896–1975), a historian trained in painting and ikebana, is increasingly admired for his contemporary Japanese garden designs. Believing the garden had fallen into cliché, Shigemori applied modernist shapes, colors and materials to create stunning avant-garde works that also celebrated the ancient Japanese gods and rituals. This bo...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
My study recognizes human waste as vital life marker because dead organisms no longer excrete. I live, therefore I shit [1]. My body as member of living cycles is paying back with metabolic byproducts what it took from the biosphere, every time ‘nature calls’. Using the indigenous technique of Terra Preta that involves fermentation, agricultural charcoal (biochar) and a dry toilet in my urban apartment, I can elevate my body into a perpetual resource provider for life forms following me in the food web. Whenever I use a conventional flush toilet, I break the laws of nature. Flushed down the sanitation system, my innermost plant nutrients are not returned to the soil – where they ecologically belong; instead they become a toxic liability for waterbodies, landfills, and the climate [2]. In response to this ‘nutrient rift’ [3] my research is repositioning organic ‘waste’ (from humans and beyond) into a framework that privileges the material circulation over meaning, and the perpetuity of life over the narrow control of epidemics. ‘Co-design with nonhumans’ takes the notion of care as imperative. Probing the causal interrelation between city dweller and environment, my study investigates the experience of tangible consequences embedded in daily routine for their transformation potential in understanding, habitus and circumstances.