Mark Axel Tveskov

Mark Axel Tveskov
Southern Oregon University | SOU · Sociology and Anthropology

PhD

About

39
Publications
15,796
Reads
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411
Citations
Citations since 2017
16 Research Items
125 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023010203040
2017201820192020202120222023010203040
Additional affiliations
September 1998 - present
Southern Oregon University
Position
  • Professor
Education
January 1994 - June 2000
University of Oregon
Field of study
  • Anthropology
September 1989 - June 1992
University of Connecticut
Field of study
  • Anthropology
September 1983 - June 1988
University of Connecticut
Field of study
  • Anthropology

Publications

Publications (39)
Article
Full-text available
Driven by the participation of Native American people in the contemporary political, cultural, and academic landscape of North America, public and academic discussions have considered the nature of contemporary American Indian identity and the persistence, survival, and (to some) reinvention of Native American cultures and traditions. I use a case...
Article
Full-text available
"Do you know the story of the Battle of Hungry Hill? A woman--Queen Mary--led the Native Americans from horseback, and her booming voice could be heard across the battlefield" -- Coquille Elder George Bundy Wasson Jr. from: http://www.ohs.org/research-and-library/oregon-historical-quarterly/current-issue.cfm The Battle of Hungry Hill, fought on Oc...
Article
Full-text available
Archaeological investigations at Miners’ Fort, a mid-nineteenth-century settler fort located in the US Northwest, is part of a larger inquiry into conflict archaeology and historical memory of settler colonialism and warfare in the region. Built by gold miners, Miners’ Fort overlooked the Pacific Ocean and was used significantly when the Tututni, J...
Book
Full-text available
an edited volume on Conflict Archaeology and Historical Memory in North America
Chapter
Full-text available
excerpt of the Introductory Chapter
Article
Full-text available
Guest editor for a thematic collection of papers on the topic of frontier fortifications in the journal Historical Archaeology
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The wars of American imperialism in the North American West are crafted in historical memory through the tropes of Manifest Destiny, where intrepid pioneers, penetrating a virginal wilderness to make their homes, must overcome a variety of morally dark forces that include the depredations of indigenous people. In this telling of the tale, the U.S....
Presentation
Full-text available
Notes for my remarks as a member of Oregon's State Advisory Committee for Historic Preservation while reviewing theQ’alya ta Kukwis schicdii me Traditional Cultural Property Historic District Nomination, put forward by the Confederated Tribes of Coos, Lower Umpqua, and Siuslaw, delivered in committee, February 22, 2019
Article
Full-text available
Frontiers are contingent and dynamic arenas for the negotiation, entrenchment, and innovation of identity, and the imposing materiality of frontier fortifications and their prominence in colonial topographies make them ideal laboratories in which to examine this dynamic. This article presents the results of large-scale excavations in 2011 and 2012...
Article
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Article
Full-text available
An essay reviewing two recent books about the Modoc War
Article
In the spring of 1872, members of the Carolina Company migrated from North Carolina to Oregon and formed the town of Powers, which is one of the most isolated areas in western Oregon. According to Chelsea Rose and Mark Tveskov,” the homesteaders, like the Native Americans, made a life along the South Fork [Coquille River] that considered the region...
Article
Full-text available
The Southern Oregon University Laboratory of Anthropology (SOULA) has engaged in substantive work in public archaeology in the Rogue River Valley in Oregon. Its efforts are often aimed at producing a greater volume of regional history and prehistory, utilizing archaeological excavation as well as ethnohistoric research and oral history. SOULA staff...
Article
Full-text available
THIS is an account of both the history and the recent findings of the Mosfell Archaeological Project. Excavation is part of an interdisciplinary research approach that uses archaeology, history, anthropology, forensics, environmental sciences and saga studies to construct a picture of human habitation, power relationships, religious and mortuary pr...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Recent excavations at Hrísbrú in the Mosfell Valley of Iceland have revealed a church and cemetery as well as domestic and ceremonial structures spanning the pagan and early conversion periods in the 10th and 11th Centuries. The skeletal remains of thirteen people buried at Hrísbrú provide new evidence of the health status and living conditions of...
Article
Full-text available
Estuarine environments often provide exceptional conditions for the preservation of perishable materials. Over the last decade, over 70 estuarine wood stake fish weir sites have been identified on the Oregon coast. In this paper, we summarize Native oral traditions and archaeological research that indicate that estuarine fishing was primarily a hou...
Chapter
Full-text available
The American settlement of Coos County, Oregon and the death and/or removal of its Native American people is often portrayed as an inevitable and natural process. I describe certain events as Americans first encountered the region's Indian people to illustrate the point that the American conquest of the region and the near genocide of its rightful...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In 1952, a team led by Luther Cressman excavated the Bandon Sandspit site (35-CS-5), a protohistoric village at the mouth of the Coquille River. A large assemblage of bone and lithic artifacts, faunal material, trade goods, and architectural remains were recovered but remained largely unreported. I present the results of analyses of these materials...
Article
Full-text available
The southern Washington, Oregon, and northern California coasts have long been peripheral to discussions of the development of Northwest Coast cultures. This marginality is challenged by recent studies that examine the dynamic cultures and environments of this area in relation to important research issues applicable to a wide range of Pacific coast...
Article
Full-text available
On the Columbia River's south bank near the town of Mosier, Oregon, is a 12+ hectare (30 acre) complex of rock walls, pits, and cairns patterned in a talus and debris field at the foot of the 30m (100ft) Columbia Gorge escarpment. Commonly known as the “Mosier Mounds”, this site is an unusually large, well-preserved example of the rock feature site...
Article
Full-text available
The nature of prehistoric settlement and subsistence practices in coastal New England has been intensively discussed by archaeologists over the last twenty years. Archaeologists have attempted to determine when and how maize horticulture was adopted in the coastal zone and how maritime resources fit into the aboriginal diet throughout the Woodland...
Article
Full-text available
We provide detailed contextual information on 25 140 dates for unusually well-preserved archaeological and paleontological remains from Daisy Cave . Paleontological materials, including faunal and floral remains, have been recov- ered from deposits spanning roughly the past 16,000 yr, while archaeological materials date back to ca . 10,500 BP. Mult...
Article
Typescript. Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Oregon, 2000. Includes vita and abstract. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 493-537).

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
(Ashland, Ore.) — Southern Oregon University has received a grant of $92,600 from the National Park Service’s American Battlefield Protection Program to produce a multiple property nomination to the National Register of Historic Places for sites related to the Rogue River War (1855-1856) in Southern Oregon. It is part of a long-term commitment by regional partners to interpret the Rogue River War in a holistic way for the public and interested scholars. The project will conduct historical research, an archaeological survey, and geographic information system (GIS) mapping to determine conflict boundaries. “As current events demonstrate, wars are often more than two armies opposing each other across an open field,” according to Mark Tveskov, principal researcher on the grant-funded project. “On thefrontier of Oregon in the 1850s, the front lines were people’s homes—both settlers and Native Americans—and the conflicts involved men, women, and children. This is our shared American history and the grant gives us the opportunity to tell the story.” This grant is one of 20 from the National Park Service totaling $1.198 million to preserve and protect significant battle sites from all wars fought on American soil. Funded projects preserve battlefields from the Colonial-Indian Wars through World War II and include site mapping (GPS/GIS data collection), archaeological studies, National Register of Historic Places nominations, preservation and management plans. Federal, state, local, and tribal governments, nonprofit organizations, and educational institutions are eligible for National Park Service battlefield grants which are awarded annually. Since 1996 more than $18 million has been awarded by the American Battlefield Protection Program to help preserve significant historic battlefields associated with wars on American soil. Additional information is onlineat www.nps.gov/abpp The Southern Oregon University Laboratory of Anthropology (SOULA) currently is conducting archaeological research on eight historical sites of the Rogue River War. Anthropologists’ work includes historical research; precise mapping of the sites including archaeological excavation; and artifact analysis and mapping. This work will culminate in the presentation of several archaeological sites as a single collective of Rogue River War sites and will serve as a significant addition to State of Oregon history. “The timing of this news is perfect. Currently, our field school is exploring one of the missing pieces of the puzzle and that’s the archaeology of the pioneer side of this conflict,” said Chelsea Rose, project archaeologist. “This week we’ve recovered the bullets, bottles and beads of the settlers huddled in a muddy fort on the Western frontier at the end of the war.” This summer, SOULA is conducting archaeological research on two sites associated with the Rogue River War as part of their summer archaeological field school. This portion of the project is funded in part by the Oregon State Parks and Recreational Department (OPRD). The project includes geophysical survey, extensive documentary research, large scale excavation, and a public archaeology program at the Geisel Monument State Heritage Site and at Miner’s Fort in Curry County. This project is the latest aspect of a multi-year collaboration with the Bureau of Land Management, OPRD, the Oregon Department of Transportation, the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians, the Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde, the Cow Creek Band of Umpqua Indians, the Coquille Indian Tribe, and the Confederated Tribes of the Coos, Lower Umpqua, and Siuslaw Indians. Previous work on Rogue River War sites include archaeological excavations at the 1852 wreck of the schooner Captain Lincoln on Coos Bay, the remains of the U.S. Army’s Fort Lane near Central Point, and the site of the Battle of Hungry Hill that took place in late October 1855. This summer’s Curry County research will benefit from the partnerships developed during these earlier projects.