Mark Stanley Price

Mark Stanley Price
University of Oxford | OX · Department of Zoology

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34
Publications
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Publications

Publications (34)
Article
Article impact statement: : Conservationists, mindful of perils of procrastination, should not wait for in situ actions to fail before considering ex situ solutions.
Article
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MRSE.pdf). Repsol and other partners are being supported by FFI to achieve best practice through voluntary compliance with IPIECA guidelines (IPIECA is the global oil and gas industry association for environmental and social issues), following Performance Standard  and the adoption of an ecosystem approach in projects. An ecosystem approach (as de...
Article
The persistence of endangered species may depend on the fate of a very small number of individual animals. In situ conservation alone may sometimes be insufficient. In these instances, the International Union for Conservation of Nature provides guidelines for ex situ conservation and the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) indicates how ex sit...
Chapter
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The quantity and quality of reintroductions of plants and animals have increased greatly over the last 30 years. This chapter reviews the extent to which reintroduction has been used in antelope conservation and the success of these initiatives. Antelopes provide a well-suited opportunity to understand the factors affecting the use and success of r...
Research
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These Guidelines are designed to be applicable to the full spectrum of conservation translocations. They are based on principle rather than example. Throughout the Guidelines there are references to accompanying Annexes that give further detail.
Article
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The Milu (Père David’s deer, Elaphurus davidianus) became extinct in China in the early 20th century but was reintroduced to the country. The reintroduced Milu escaped from a nature reserve and dispersed to the south of the Yangtze River. We monitored these accidentally escaped Milu from 1995 to 2012. The escaped Milu searched for vacant habitat pa...
Article
The outcomes of species recovery programs have been mixed; high-profile population recoveries contrast with species-level extinctions. Each conservation intervention has its own challenges, but to inform more effective management it is imperative to assess whether correlates of wider recovery program success or failure can be identified. To contrib...
Article
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1. In dryland ecosystems, mobility is essential for both wildlife and people to access unpredictable and spatially heterogeneous resources, particularly in the face of climate change. Fences can prevent connectivity vital for this mobility. 2. There are recent calls for large-scale barrier fencing interventions to address human–wildlife conflict an...
Article
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Release of confiscated and captive-bred parrots: is it ever acceptable? - Volume 49 Issue 2 - Nigel J. Collar, Michael Lierz, Mark R. Stanley Price, Roland Z. Wirth
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Packer et al. reported that fenced lion populations attain densities closer to carrying capacity than unfenced populations. However, fenced populations are often maintained above carrying capacity, and most are small. Many more lions are conserved per dollar invested in unfenced ecosystems, which avoid the ecological and economic costs of fencing.
Chapter
The near-exponential growth in the frequency of reintroductions surely indicates that reintroductions are now a highly effective tool to combat the increasing loss of global biodiversity. This chapter discusses the questions regarding risks, the initiation of reintroductions, the refinement of reintroduction techniques and evaluations of reintroduc...
Article
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This paper is a personal view, deriving from the knowledge base of the Arabian Penin-sula's fauna, the record on re-introduction of Arabian Oryx and Houbara Bustard, and selective conservation actions for the region's species, to propose an ambitious vision for restoring the re-gion's key ecosystems through re-wilding, a holistic approach for biodi...
Article
Moving species outside their natural ranges has long been recognized as risky (“Home, home outside the range?”, R. Stone, News Focus, 24 September, p. [1592][1]). Current accepted procedure allows for translocations outside the historic range only reactively—when there is no suitable habitat
Article
Four systematic sample censuses are described, one of elephants in Tsavo East National Park, and three of kongoni on the Athi-Kapiti Plains. Flight paths in the form of a regular grid with 5-km spacing were used. Distribution maps from each census are shown. A statistical test is described, which revealed the presence in two of the censuses of non-...
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Stopping further global losses of amphibian populations and species requires an unprecedented conservation response.
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Concentrations of large numbers of endemic species have been singled out in prioritization exercises as significant areas for global biodiversity conservation. This paper describes bird and mammal endemicity in Indo-Pacific ecoregions. An ecoregion is a relatively large unit of land or water that contains a distinct assemblage of natural communitie...
Chapter
The recent surge of interest in the use of reintroduction, especially of captive-bred animals, as a conservation tool, has resulted in two recent reviews of the subject (Jones, 1990; Gipps, 1991) and the formation of a Re-introduction Specialist Group (RSG) of the Species Survival Commission (SSC) of the World Conservation Union (IUCN) and a Reintr...
Chapter
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This paper explores the extent to which reintroduction of captive-born animals is being used as a conservation strategy, the extent to which zoos are participating, the success of reintroduction, and some characteristics of these reintroduction programmes as they relate to success. This paper does not provide guidelines for reintroduction; see Klei...
Article
If, as Colin Tudge (1991) asserts, ‘the proper end point of captive breeding is reintroduction’, then it is timely that we examine the status of the science and art of reintroduction. Restoring extirpated species to their natural environment is not new, but the recent upsurge in interest in reintroductions is in part due to a perceived need for zoo...
Article
Experiments in domesticating fringe-eared oryx on a Kenya ranch suggest they could be an economic proposition in semi-arid areas, where domestic cattle can only be kept for a few months each year. Oryx have also proved superior to eland, at one time believed to be the most promising wild ungulate for domestication, largely because they feed by day,...
Article
(1) The nutrient status of wild hartebeest shot in 4 months is assessed after estimation of the amount of food eaten and the composition of the rumen contents, combined with the nutrient content of the diet's constituents. The daily intakes of crude protein, gross energy and total digestible nutrients are calculated, and compared with the establish...
Article
The Bongo of the Cherangani Hills - Volume 10 Issue 2 - Mark Stanley Price
Article
The Defassa waterbuck was studied in the Kafue National Park in Zambia for a total of 455 days extending over a period of two years. 59 waterbuck were immobilised and marked with plastic collars and ear tags. waterbuck populations can be divided into “units “, and the structure and stability of these < units” are described. Territorial behaviour in...

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