Mark Staniforth

Mark Staniforth
Flinders University · Department of Archaeology

PhD. MA. BSc.

About

50
Publications
9,792
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272
Citations
Introduction
Mark has broad experience in historical archaeology, maritime archaeology, museums and heritage studies in a career that spans more than thirty-five years. He is currently an Adjunct Associate Professor associated with the Maritime Archaeology Program in the College of Humaniities, Arts and Social Sciences (CHASS) at Flinders University. In 2012 he was was elected as a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of London (FSA). He is a professional member of ICOMOS and an expert member of two ICOMOS International Scientific Committees – ICOMOS-ICUCH (International Committee on the Underwater Cultural Heritage) and ICOMOS-ICAHM (International Committee on Archaeological Heritage Management). For a more complete collection of Mark's publications see https://flinders.academia.edu/MarkStaniforth
Additional affiliations
January 1997 - December 2010
Flinders University
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
Description
  • Head of the Maritime Archaeology Program

Publications

Publications (50)
Article
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Capability building enables people, groups, organisations and nations to achieve a greater range of activities. A program of capability building activities in Vietnam over the past decade provides the case study for this paper. From these activities and the progress of the program we have constructed an explicit approach of capability building that...
Conference Paper
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Shipbuilding in a colonial context draws on traditions from a variety of places including the parent culture. Colonial shipbuilding adapts and evolves over time to meet the local environmental conditions, the availability of endemic and other timbers and to suit the requirements of local and regional mercantile commerce. Establishing the identity a...
Article
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An international research group including researchers from, or associated with, the Institute of Nautical Archaeology at Texas A & M University, the Field Museum in Chicago, the University of Colorado, Denver as well as Monash University, Murdoch University and Flinders University in Australia have worked in Vietnam. Since 2008 this international t...
Article
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From AD 1274 Chinese emperor Kublai Khan dispatched fleets of ships in a series of attempts to expand the empire's hegemony and extend his rule into East Asia (Japan) and Southeast Asia (Vietnam, Champa and Java). Archaeological remains associated with the fleets and battles have been found at Takashima Island, Japan and on the Bạch Ðằng River, Vie...
Chapter
Full-text available
Training Manual for the UNESCO Foundation Course on the Protection and Management of Underwater Cultural Heritage in Asia and the Pacific is a fruit of a UNESCO regional capacity-building project to protect and manage underwater archaeological sites through the establishment of a regional Centre of Excellence, funded by the Royal Government of Norw...
Article
Australia is quintessentially a maritime nation where sea travel and transportation have been vitally important. Despite being an island, Australia hasd never completely felt isolated, and the indigenous peoples were never cut off from the rest of the world. This article presents four case studies in order to provide insights into the types and ext...
Article
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This chapter considers international approaches to Underwater Cultural Heritage such as the United Nations Convention of the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) the 1996 ICOMOS Charter for the Protection and Management of Underwater Cultural Heritage and the 2001 UNESCO Convention on the Protection of the Underwater Cultural Heritage. The paper will also consi...
Article
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Alcohol consumption was one of the primary ways in which the nineteenth century middle-class distinguished themselves from the working-class. The working-class were perceived by the middles class as drunken goo-for-nothings whose situation in life was brought about by their own intemperance. Drinking was central to the notion of respectability and...
Article
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Abstract What has been learned from the detailed study of cargo material found on merchant shipwreck sites in Australia? some extensive collections of shipwreck cargo material have resulted from archaeological excavations by maritime archaeologists over the past 30 years or so. Other collec-tions have been created by scUbA divers, primarily before...
Article
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Submerged cultural resource managers have a daunting task; balance the protection of the underwater cultural heritage without denying or unfairly restricting economic development of the coastal zone. Underwater archaeological resources such as historic shipwrecks and submerged prehistoric sites can and have been impacted by fishing, farming, and en...
Article
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In recent years the Maritime Archaeology Program (MAP) at Flinders University has developed an innovative work-integrated learning program, in association with industry partners that includes fieldwork opportunities and internships (work-placements). This is largely in response to suggestions from consultancy companies and government agencies about...
Article
This paper suggests that rather than changes in methods or advances in technology it is changes at an International level as a result of the bringing into force of the 2001 UNESCO Convention on the Protection of the Underwater Cultural Heritage that will provide the greatest challenges to the way in which research in underwater archaeology will be...
Article
Full-text available
Maritime archaeology is a multi-faceted discipline that requires both theoretical learning and practical skills training. In the past most universities have approached the teaching of maritime archaeology as a full-time on-campus activity designed for ‘traditional’ graduate students; primarily those in their early twenties who have recently come fr...
Chapter
Full-text available
In Australia (and New Zealand) the earliest contact between Europeans and Indigenous peoples was commonly between Europeans pursuing a whale fishery and the local Indigenous populations. The arrival of the whalers often represented first contact - their interactions and exchanges made the beach a dangerous and contested ground - of beginnings and e...
Chapter
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Australia is the world's largest island and the only single nation to occupy a continent entirely surrounded by water. The sea and shipping have played an important part in Australian history in a variety of areas including exploration, settlement, immigration, trade, commercial industries, sport and recreation. In the past four centuries many thou...
Chapter
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As one of Australia's most intact timberr shipwrecks, the William Salthouse superbly illustrates the archaeological value of underwater heritage places. By reading the ship's manifest, which lists the wide range of cargo it carried, and comparing it to the artefacts recorded on nthe site, a great deal of information on early trade to the colonies h...
Article
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The Abandoned Ships’ Project (ASP) was a research initiative of the Department of Archaeology at Flinders University, South Australia, and carried out in conjunction with the doctoral research of one of the authors (Richards 2002). The project involved the compilation of a database of more than 1,500 discarded and partly dismantled watercraft site...
Chapter
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This chapter has considered the analysis of artifacts from shipwreck and other underwater archaeological sites such as jetties. It suggests that maritime archaeologists need to consider the possible meanings of things. It also argues that cargo artifacts can reveal ingrained cultural behaviors and attitudes that demonstrate cultural continuity betw...
Article
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Book description: The Cambridge Companion to Historical Archaeology provides an overview of the international field of historical archaeology (c. AD 1500 to the present) through seventeen specially-commissioned essays from leading researchers in the field. The volume explores key themes in historical archaeology including documentary archaeology, t...
Article
Archaeologists have generally been slow to recognize the value of Annales approaches to their discipline, and maritime archaeologists, in particular, have been even slower. The analytical framework used in this paper draws on applications of Annales approaches to archaeology in what is termed the "archaeology of the event." The resulting holistic a...
Chapter
Full-text available
As special interest tourism, in particular cultural tourism has become more popular the promotion and presentation of archaeological sites has become increasingly common. For many decades, tourist have been able to participate in archaeological site tours and heritage trails in places like the Middle East and Europe. This phenomenon is seen increas...
Chapter
The food, drink and other consumer goods—the portable material culture—that people wanted and needed in the early Australian colonies were structured by cultural preferences. Those who had money could obtain at least some goods and thus demonstrate their command over material objects. For those who didn’t have the money, material goods acted as an...
Chapter
This chapter describes the methodology employed in conducting the research presented in this book. It also discusses the range of source materials available and, perhaps more importantly, indicates some of the limitations, or unavailability, of certain kinds of source materials.
Chapter
Each of the four vessels discussed in this book represents a slightly different facet of the long-distance carriage of goods to the early Australian colonies. These goods need not necessarily have been made in Great Britain since the British were tied into a burgeoning global economy. The cargoes could, and did, include goods from many parts of the...
Chapter
This chapter begins with an examination of the background and historical context of a voyage by the trading vessel William Salthouse that ended when the vessel was lost at the entrance to Port Phillip in July 1841. Like Sydney Cove (see Chapter 5), William Salthouse sank just a few years after the establishment of the colony to which it had been di...
Chapter
In the inaugural volume of the Contributions to Global Historical Archaeology series, Charles Orser explored the existing definitions of historical archaeology and proposed that there are four “haunts” or “historical processes that underlie all historical archaeological research”—colonialism, Eurocentrism, capitalism and modernity (Orser, 1996: 22...
Chapter
Archaeology has been, and to some extent still is, seen as the study of the non-literate, prehistoric or ancient past through the study of material remains. Doubtless there are as many definitions of archaeology as there are archaeologists but the notion that archaeology is about very old things remains one of the most pervasive. Even within defini...
Chapter
The first part of this chapter provides the historical context and background for an unsuccessful attempt to import a speculative cargo into Port Jackson on board the country trade vessel Sydney Cove in 1796–1797. In February 1797, Sydney Cove was wrecked while on a voyage from Calcutta, India to the newly established British penal colony at Port J...
Chapter
This chapter provides the historical context and background to, as well as examining the history and archaeology of, two unsuccessful attempts to import cargoes of goods from Great Britain to the Swan River Colony. The first (James Matthews) occurred in 1841, just twelve years after British settlement and the second (Eglinton) was some eleven years...
Article
The establishment of a consumer society in Australia has not been a particularly well explored area of academic inquiry. My interests lie in the concepts and meanings that underlie the material world; ideas like, in the words of Madonna, "I am a material girl and I live in a material world" (terminology taken to be not gender specific), the classic...
Article
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Significance assessment is frequently used to evaluate the importance of archaeological sites both on land and, more recently, underwater. The assessment of significance often determines suitability for legislative protection. Australia has a variable record with regard to the legislative protection of twentieth century underwater cultural heritage...
Article
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Le William Salthouse a ete le premier navire marchand a quitter le Dominion britannique du Canada avec une cargaison de marchandises a destination des colonies anglaises nouvellement etablies en Australie. Le navire a peri le 27 novembre 1841 en essayant d’entrer dans le port de Phillip Heads a la fin d’un voyage qui l’avait mene de Montreal et Que...
Article
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 For a small sub-discipline of archaeology, maritime archaeology seems to have had a relatively long and glorious history in Australia. Celebratory reviews or overviews of selected parts of the history of Australian maritime archaeology have been published fairly regularly since the 1986 appearance of Graeme Henderson's book Maritime Archaeology i...
Article
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The wooden sailing vessel William Salthouse was wrecked at Port Phillip Heads on Saturday 27 November 1841 at the end of a trading voyage from Canada to the new Port Phillip colony (Victoria) in Australia. The remains of the vessel were relocated in ten to thirteen metres of water by two SCUBA divers during a drift dive in August 1982. As far as ca...

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Project (1)
Project
Research and training in maritime archaeology in association with the Institute of Archaeology in Vietnam.