Mark Royer

Mark Royer
University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa | UH Manoa · Institute of Marine Biology

PhD

About

9
Publications
5,017
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169
Citations

Publications

Publications (9)
Article
Full-text available
Background Great hammerhead sharks (Sphyrna mokarran) routinely swim on their sides and periodically roll from side to side. A previous study used wind tunnel tests with a rigid model hammerhead shark to demonstrate that the rolling behavior could improve swimming efficiency using the tall first dorsal fin as a lift-generating surface. Scalloped ha...
Article
Full-text available
Diel vertical migration is a widespread behavioral phenomenon where organisms migrate through the water column and may modify behavior relative to changing environmental conditions based on physiological tolerances. Here, we combined a novel suite of biologging technologies to examine the thermal physiology (intramuscular temperature), fine-scale s...
Article
Full-text available
This “Perspectives” paper identifies aspects of tiger shark (Galeocerdo cuvier) biology that are currently unknown or for which additional data are needed to improve interpretive power. Some of these data gaps may be regional. Technical or methodological approaches to acquiring these data are suggested. Some of these technologies already exist, som...
Article
Full-text available
We compared tiger shark (Galeocerdo cuvier) spatial behaviour among 4 Hawaiian Islands to evaluate whether local patterns of movement could explain higher numbers of shark bites seen around Maui than other islands. Our sample consisted of 96 electronically-tagged (satellite and acoustic transmitters) tiger sharks, individually tracked for up to 6 y...
Article
The redistribution of species has emerged as one of the most pervasive impacts of anthropogenic climate warming, and presents many societal challenges. Understanding how temperature regulates species distributions is particularly important for mobile marine fauna such as sharks given their seemingly rapid responses to warming, and the socio-politic...
Article
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This study presents the longest uninterrupted acoustic monitoring record available to date for the leopard shark Triakis semifasciata, providing novel insight into the fine-scale and long-term movement patterns of this species, and demonstrating that both sexes exhibit sitespecific aggregation behavior and seasonal philopatry. Twenty females and 13...
Article
Full-text available
Tiger sharks (Galecerdo cuvier) are apex predators characterized by their broad diet, large size and rapid growth. Tiger shark maximum size is typically between 380 & 450 cm Total Length (TL), with a few individuals reaching 550 cm TL, but the maximum size of tiger sharks in Hawaii waters remains uncertain. A previous study suggested tiger sharks g...

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