Mark Olokotum

Mark Olokotum
National Fisheries Resources Research Institute · Capture Fisheries and Biodiversity Conservation Research Programme

Msc. Zoology/Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences

About

12
Publications
4,779
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
117
Citations
Introduction
I hold a Master of Science degree in Zoology/Fisheries from Makerere University, Kampala (Uganda). In addition, a second Master’s degree in Environmental Science - Limnology and Wetland Management from the University of Natural Resources and Life sciences (BOKU), Austria, Egerton University - Kenya, and UNESCO-IHE, The Netherlands. Bachelor of Science in Fisheries and Aquaculture. I have over eight years’ experience in biodiversity conservation & assessments, natural resources management, research, Fisheries management, project operations, human developments and capacity building. I have collaborated with a multi-disciplinary team of environmentalists at national, regional and international levels.
Additional affiliations
November 2017 - March 2021
Makerere University
Position
  • PhD Student
May 2016 - October 2016
IHE Delft Institute for Water Education
Position
  • Post Graduate Student in Limnology and Wetland Management
February 2016 - March 2016
Egerton University
Position
  • Post Graduate Student in Limnology and Wetland Management
Education
September 2015 - May 2017
University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna
Field of study
  • Applied Limnology - Limnology and Wetland Management
August 2011 - December 2013
Makerere University
Field of study
  • Zoology/Fisheries and Aquatic Science (Natural Resources Management)
August 2007 - May 2010
Makerere University
Field of study
  • Fisheries & Aquaculture

Publications

Publications (12)
Article
Full-text available
Funding biodiversity conservation strategies are usually minimal, thus prioritizing habitats at high risk should be conducted. We developed and tested a conservation priority index (CPI) that ranks habitats to aid in prioritizing them for conservation. We tested the index using 1897 fish species from 273 African inland lakes and 34 countries. In th...
Article
Full-text available
This study investigated the catch estimates, mortality, growth, food and feeding habits, and water parameters of Oreochromis variabilis in Upper Victoria Nile (UVN) from 2008 to 2019. Catch rates ranged 0.32±0.08 to 3.42±1.13 kg, boat-1, day-1 with the length-weight relationship indicating Isometric growth. Growth parameters obtained were L∞=36.75,...
Article
Full-text available
Eutrophication of Lake Victoria led to changes in its phytoplankton communities. However, different levels of eutrophication exist in the open lake and the bays, and between embayments. This study utilized spatial and temporal sampling of Napoleon Gulf and Murchison Bay, exhibiting different trophic conditions. Over one year, we investigated phytop...
Preprint
Full-text available
Freshwater ecosystems occupy <1% of the Earth’s total surface area but provide an array of ecosystem services. However, these ecosystems are threatened by multiple stressors, including overexploitation, infrastructure developments, habitat alteration, and alien species introductions. The magnitude of these threats varies in different water bodies,...
Preprint
Full-text available
We determined fisheries management reference points for three major fish stocks in Lake Victoria (Nile tilapia, Nile perch and Dagaa) for Uganda and the whole lake. The aim was to ascertain stock status and define reasonable objectives and targets for rebuilding to sustainable levels. Dagaa was found to be healthy in Uganda and the whole lake but t...
Article
Africa is experiencing high annual population growth in its major river basins. This growth has resulted in significant land use change and pollution pressures on the freshwater ecosystems. Among them, the Lake Victoria basin, with more than 42 million people, is a unique and vital resource that provides food and drinking water in East Africa. Howe...
Chapter
Full-text available
Climate variability and change, which intensified since 1970s, are threatening natural resources and livelihoods in Sub-Saharan Africa where people depend on climate sensitive natural resources, such as agriculture and fisheries, but have limited capacity to adapt. Increasing human and institutional capacity to address threats posed by climate chan...
Article
Climate variability and change that have been intensifying since the 1970s are accompanied by changes in hydrology and water balance of inland aquatic systems. These changes, however, have not been well documented with regard to small and shallow aquatic systems that are more vulnerable. Changes in temperature, rainfall and wind speed around Lakes...
Article
Inland fisheries are important for nutrition, employment, and income, but climate variability and change are adding to other stressors, such as overexploitation, pollution, habitat degradation, and invasive species, to threaten their productivity as well as livelihoods of fisheries-dependent communities. Understanding the whole socio-ecological sys...
Article
Inland fisheries are important for nutrition, employment, and income, but climate variability and change are adding to other stressors, such as overexploitation, pollution, habitat degradation, and invasive species, to threaten their productivity as well as livelihoods of fisheries-dependent communities. Understanding the whole socio-ecological sys...
Article
Full-text available
Fisheries resources support livelihoods of fishing communities but are threatened by over-exploitation, habitat degradation, pollution, invasive species and climate change. Unlike the other threats, climate change has received limited consideration and reducing its risks requires appropriate adaptation strategies. This study used quantitative and q...
Article
Changes in the catches of Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus (Linnaeus, 1758), in Lake Wamala (Uganda) have been observed since its introduction. The factors contributing to these changes, however, are not well understood. This study examined changes in species composition, size structure, size at first maturity, length–weight relationship and con...

Questions

Questions (3)
Question
I am working on the dynamics in the phytoplankton assemblage of Lake Victoria. I need some guidance on the best approach to model the chlorophyll-a, and or phytoplankton diversity in the lake,
Are there any experts in the field (phytoplankton or modelling) to guide me during my research activities?
Question
This going to be a challenge to environmentalists in a rich biodiversity sport and ecologically sensitive area

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (2)
Archived project
The WaSAf programme (Monitoring and Sustainable Management of Surface Freshwater Sources in Africa) deals with the elaboration of long-term monitoring programs in order to facilitate the sustainable management of surface freshwater resources used (or planned to be used) for drinking water supply in three African countries : Lac de Guiers (Sénégal), Murchinson bay (lake Victoria in Uganda) and Aghien lagoon (Ivory Coast). These three cities share a very high population growth and consequently an increase in their demand for safe water. But the fresh water ecosystems have experienced a decrease in their water quality in the 20 past years as illustrated for example by the occurrence of recurrent cyanobacterial blooms in each of them. The global aims of the Wasaf project is to evaluate the ecological status of these ecosystems and the trends in the evolution of this status in the next years, to implement long term monitoring programs on these resources, to evaluate what are the pressures acting on them and how these pressures have an impact on the water quality and to prepare actions for their protection and/or their restoration. The already available knowledge on the three ecosystems and the actions already implemented for their monitoring and protection are very heterogeneous. Moreover, the geographical and institutional contexts are also very different from one country to another one, which will provide the opportunity for scientists and stakeholders to compare and exchange experience and to built a network on the monitoring and the protection of surface water resources in Africa.
Project
The WHO established 1.0 µg l-1 as a provisional guideline on allowable concentrations of the structural microcystins in drinking water. We would like to achieve this guideline amidst the cyanobacterial blooms in surface waters.