Mark Miller

Mark Miller
NIRAS

Doctor of Philosophy

About

16
Publications
5,312
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416
Citations

Publications

Publications (16)
Article
Enhanced management of areas important for marine biodiversity are now obligations under a range of international treaties. Tracking data provide unparalleled information on the distribution of marine taxa, but there are no agreed guidelines that ensure these data are used consistently to identify biodiversity hotspots and inform marine management...
Article
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Sexual segregation in the behaviour, morphology or physiology of breeding seabirds can be related to divergent parental roles, foraging niche partitioning or sex-specific nutritional requirements. Here, we combine GPS tracking, dietary and nutritional analysis to investigate sex-specific foraging of Brown Boobies breeding on Raine Island, Great Bar...
Article
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1.Our understanding of the niche concept will remain limited while the quantity and range of different food types eaten remains a dominant proxy for niche breadth, as this does not account for the broad ecological context that governs diet. Linking nutrition, physiology and behaviour are critical to predict the extent to which a species adjusts its...
Article
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Foraging with tuna is a well-documented seabird strategy, referred to as facilitated foraging. However, despite this behaviour being considered almost obligatory in nutrient-poor tropical waters, little data exist on its relative importance to individual colonies. Therefore, to examine facilitated foraging under different patterns of nutrient avail...
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The Japanese Murrelet Synthliboramphus wumizusume is a rare, globally 'Vulnerable' seabird, endemic to Japan and South Korea. However, little is known of its at-sea distribution, habitat or threats. We conducted several years of at-sea surveys around Japan to model Japanese Murrelet density in relation to habitat parameters, and make spatial predic...
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Identifying important sites for biodiversity is vital for conservation and management. However, there is a lack of accessible, easily‐applied tools that enable practitioners to delineate important sites for highly mobile species using established criteria. We introduce the R package ‘track2KBA’, a tool to identify important sites at the population...
Article
Designating and managing marine protected areas (MPAs) can mitigate many ocean threats. Banning fishing activities within MPAs enhances the robustness of food-web dynamics and thus increases trophic resilience. Ecosystem function indicators, such as mean trophic level, are increasingly applied in conservation management. Stable isotope analysis is...
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Two species breeding in sympatry are more likely to coexist if their ecological niches are segregated either in time, space or in trophic habits. Here, we combined GPS-tracking, stable isotope analysis and DNA metabarcoding analysis to understand how the rare Tahiti petrel Pseudobulweria rostrata (TP) copes with the very abundant (i.e. 500,000 bree...
Article
High densities of large herbivores can have detrimental effects on plant biomass. Understanding the relationship between animal densities and plant distribution and abundance is essential for the conservation of endangered species and ecosystems. Mountain gorilla censuses conducted for different periods in the last three decades have revealed a ste...
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Most countries have committed to protect 17% of their terrestrial area by 2020 through Aichi Target 11 of the Convention on Biological Diversity, with a focus on protecting areas of particular importance for biodiversity. This means national-scale spatial conservation prioritisations are needed to help meet this target and guide broader conservatio...
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Niche divergence is expected for species that compete for shared resources, including migrants that occupy similar regions during the non-breeding season. Studies of temperate seabirds indicate that both spatial and behavioural segregation can be important mechanisms for reducing competition, but there have been few investigations of resource parti...
Article
Full-text available
Niche divergence is expected for species that compete for shared resources, including migrants that occupy similar regions during the non-breeding season. Studies of temperate seabirds indicate that both spatial and behavioural segregation can be important mechanisms for reducing competition, but there have been few investigations of resource parti...
Conference Paper
There is relatively substantive knowledge of the mechanisms driving prey distribution and availability to upper level predators in temperate marine environments but less so for the tropics. Breeding wedge-tailed shearwaters (Ardenna pacifica) of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) use locations 'at-distance' from the colony when self-provisioning during l...
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To determine whether breeding tropical shearwaters use “at-distance” locations during the long-trip phase of their bimodal foraging cycle, we deployed PTT satellite tracking devices on adult Wedge-tailed Shearwaters Ardenna pacifica of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR), Australia, over three breeding seasons. During the long-trip phase (8–14 d), a compo...
Article
Understanding spatial and temporal variability in the distribution of species is fundamental to the conservation of marine and terrestrial ecosystems. To support strategic decision making aimed at sustainable management of the oceans, such as the establishment of protected areas for marine wildlife, we identified areas predicted to support multispe...
Article
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The “Critically Endangered” Beck’s Petrel Pseudobulweria becki has been recorded regularly in the Bismarck Sea during the past five years, but its nesting grounds are yet to be located. Previously, over 70 years elapsed between the collection of the original specimens in 1928 and 1929, and the next confirmed observations in 2007. We evaluate over 4...

Projects

Project (1)
Archived project