Mark Manning

Mark Manning
Oakland University · Department of Psychology

About

58
Publications
6,567
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953
Citations
Citations since 2017
37 Research Items
742 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023050100150

Publications

Publications (58)
Article
Background: The COVID-19 pandemic has disproportionately impacted older Black Americans. Given that assistance networks play a crucial role in older adults' ability to respond to challenges, we sought to investigate whether older adults' assistance network size changed during the COVID-19 pandemic and differed by race. Methods: We analyzed data...
Article
Full-text available
Background: This study aimed to identify predictors of nonadherence to breast cancer screening guidelines in an urban screening clinic among high- and average-risk women in the United States. Methods: We reviewed records of 6090 women who received ≥2 screening mammograms over 2 years at the Karmanos Cancer Institute to examine how breast cancer...
Article
Full-text available
Mistrust in the information and treatment provided by medical professionals and organizations hinders cancer screening among African Americans. However, its impact on responses to health messaging aimed at bolstering screening uptake is unknown. The present study examined the effects of medical mistrust on message framing and culturally targeted he...
Article
Background: Guideline-congruent breast cancer (BC) screening is imperative to systematically curb BC mortality. This study was conducted to identify predictors of BC screening behaviors congruent with guidelines from various nationally recognized organizations (e.g, American Cancer Society, National Comprehensive Cancer Network, American College of...
Article
Receptivity to recommended colorectal cancer (CRC) screening can be enhanced by use of loss-framed health messaging that emphasizes possible consequences of failing to act. However, a simultaneous use of culturally targeted messaging may be needed to achieve effectiveness when loss-framed messaging is used with African Americans, especially to redu...
Article
Full-text available
Background Cancer clinical trial participation is low and inequitable. Partnering Around Cancer Clinical Trials (PACCT) addressed systemic and interpersonal barriers through an observational study of eligibility and an intervention to improve patient–physician communication and trial invitation rates. Methods Physicians at two comprehensive cancer...
Article
Objective: The current study investigated whether culturally targeted message frames alter preferences for specific colorectal cancer (CRC) screening modalities among African Americans. Method: African Americans who were eligible for CRC screening (N = 457) viewed a video about CRC risks, prevention, and recommended screening options. Participan...
Article
Full-text available
Lower colorectal cancer screening rates among African Americans contribute to higher colorectal cancer incidence and mortality. We tested the effects of a racially-targeted messaging intervention that used favorable behavioral norm information to increase uptake of at-home Fecal Immunochemical Test (FIT) Kits. We expected stronger intervention effe...
Article
101 Background: Cancer clinical trial enrollment rates are low, with Black individuals especially underrepresented. We tested Partnering Around Cancer Clinical Trials (PACCT), a multi-level intervention designed to improve patient-physician communication and increase trial invitations among Black and White men with prostate cancer. This study repor...
Article
Most research on the effects of racism and discrimination on the health and well-being of African Americans utilize a deficit perspective, one that homogeneously paints African Americans as disadvantaged victims. Such approaches do little to highlight the variability in the effects of racism and discrimination on relevant outcomes, and the resource...
Article
Objectives Pre-pandemic research suggests assistance networks for older adults grow over time and are larger for those living with dementia. We examined how assistance networks of older adults changed in response to the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic and whether these changes differed for those with and without dementia. Methods We used three roun...
Article
e24137 Background: Cancer clinical trial enrollment rates are low, with Black individuals especially underrepresented. We tested Partnering Around Cancer Clinical Trials (PACCT), a multi-level intervention designed to improve patient-physician communication and increase trial invitations among Black and White men with prostate cancer. This study re...
Article
Background Assumptions regarding within-race variation in the associations between measures of discrimination racism and health-related behaviors among African Americans have been largely unexplored. Methods We conducted secondary analyses of two studies to examine support for a model which describes several theoretical moderators of the effects o...
Article
Full-text available
Background: The study was conducted to evaluate racial differences in referral and uptake of genetic counseling (GC) in a clinic- based population of women with breast cancer. Methods: Medical records of 150 breast cancer patients at the Karmanos Cancer Institute were reviewed to determine eligibility for GC according to National Comprehensive Can...
Preprint
Full-text available
Purpose: Carriers of pathogenic variants in BRCA1/2 have an elevated lifetime cancer risk warranting high-risk screening and risk-reducing procedures for early detection and prevention. We report on prevention practices among women with pathogenic BRCA variants to evaluate compliance with NCCN recommendations and to identify barriers to guideline-r...
Article
Understanding how individual beliefs and societal values influence support for measures to prevent SARS-CoV-2 transmission is vital to developing and implementing effective prevention policies. Using both Just World Theory and Cultural Dimensions Theory, the present study considered how individual-level justice beliefs and country-level social valu...
Article
Full-text available
Objective We describe the development and pilot test of a physician-focused, web-based training module designed to improve physician communication related to clinical trials in a diverse cancer patient population. Methods Researchers and stakeholders developed the training module, which included a video explaining patient-centered communication st...
Article
Full-text available
Importance The impact of COVID-19 in the US has been far-reaching and devastating, especially in Black populations. Vaccination is a critical part of controlling community spread, but vaccine acceptance has varied, with some research reporting that Black individuals in the US are less willing to be vaccinated than other racial/ethnic groups. Medica...
Article
Breast density notification laws have been adopted in the absence of consistent guidelines for post‐notification follow‐up. This can lead to inconsistent and potentially deficient management of women's health due to inconsistent physician practices. We examined physicians’ knowledge and practices regarding follow‐up for patients who receive density...
Poster
Full-text available
10524 Background: Carriers of pathogenic variants in cancer susceptibility genes have an elevated risk of developing breast, ovarian, and other cancers. We conducted a medical record review to determine the uptake of genetic counseling and testing in a clinic-based population of women with breast cancer. Methods: Medical records of 150 women with b...
Article
In Reply Our study¹ found that Black men with prostate cancer indicated less willingness to discuss clinical trials with their physicians than White men and that this racial difference was statistically mediated by greater medical mistrust among Black men in our sample. Borno and colleagues suggest that focusing on medical mistrust blames patients,...
Preprint
Full-text available
Purpose Clinical trials are critical to advancing cancer treatments, yet their impact is hindered by low accrual rates, especially among minorities. One barrier is the quality of physician communication during clinical interactions in which trials are discussed. We describe the development and pilot test of a physician-focused, web-based training m...
Article
Importance: Black individuals are underrepresented in cancer clinical trials. Objective: To examine whether Black and White men with prostate cancer differ in their willingness to discuss clinical trials with their physicians and, if so, whether patient-level barriers statistically mediate racial differences. Design, setting, and participants:...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Family history (FH) remains one of the strongest risk factors for many common cancers and is used to determine cancer genetic counseling (CGC) eligibility, but the understanding of familial cancer patterns in African Americans is limited. Methods: This study evaluated cancer FH among African Americans with invasive breast cancer, pro...
Conference Paper
p>Individuals with familial cancers are at increased risk of second primary cancers, and there are clear clinical guidelines for treatment and follow-up. However, the literature on the patterns of cancer family history (FH) in African Americans (AAs) is sparse. Detroit Research on Cancer Survivors (ROCS) is a population-based cohort study of AAs re...
Article
Full-text available
PURPOSE Cancer clinical trial accrual rates are low, and information about contributing factors is needed. We examined video-recorded clinical interactions to identify circumstances under which patients potentially eligible for a trial at a major cancer center were offered a trial. METHODS We conducted a qualitative directed content analysis of 62...
Article
Objective: Two longitudinal studies examined whether effects of subjective norms on secondary cancer prevention behaviors were stronger and more likely to non-deliberative (i.e., partially independent of behavioral intentions) for African Americans (AAs) compared to European Americans (EAs), and whether the effects were moderated by racial identity...
Article
e23169 Background: Clinical trial accrual among cancer patients is low (2-5%). More data are needed to identify barriers to enrollment and inform interventions. One way to identify the greatest barriers is by examining clinical interactions. We investigated whether and under what circumstances patients potentially eligible for a trial at a major ca...
Article
Full-text available
This study demonstrates the potential of racial identity to moderate how gain and loss-framed messaging, as well as culturally-targeted messaging, can affect receptivity to preventive health screening. African–Americans (N = 132) who were noncompliant with recommended colorectal cancer (CRC) screening completed a measure of racial identity centrali...
Article
Full-text available
Background Breast density notification laws mandate reporting of dense breast to applicable women. The same psychological and systemic barriers that yield between-race differences in mammography use will probably yield between-race differences in women’s psychological and behavioral responses to breast density notifications. Purpose We used the th...
Article
Guidelines recommend supplemental breast cancer screening for women at increased breast cancer risk; however, the passage of breast density notification laws may lead to supplemental screening that is incongruent with women's risk. We examined supplemental screening (ie, MRI, ultrasound, or tomosynthesis within 6 months of screening mammogram) amon...
Conference Paper
Background: Few patients, especially racial/ethnic minorities, enroll in clinical trials (CTs) in the United States, in part due to factors related to patient-physician interactions. We describe a theory-based patient intervention to improve communication and enrollment of Black and White men in prostate cancer CTs. We also report on preliminary ba...
Article
Full-text available
Background Cancer clinical trials are essential for testing new treatments and represent state-of-the-art cancer treatment, but only a small percentage of patients ever enroll in a trial. Under-enrollment is an even greater problem among minorities, particularly African Americans, representing a racial/ethnic disparity in cancer care. One understud...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Prior research shows between-race differences in women's knowledge and emotions related to having dense breasts, thus suggesting that between-race differences in behavioral decision-making following receipt of breast density (BD) notifications are likely. Guided by the theory of planned behavior, this study examined differences in emot...
Article
143Background: Few patients, especially racial/ethnic minorities, enroll in clinical trials (CT), in part due to patient-oncologist communication. Question prompt lists (QPLs) improve communication, but have not been tested in CT discussions in a diverse patient population. We describe the development and acceptability of a theory-based QPL to impr...
Article
Full-text available
Rationale: Many states have adopted laws mandating breast density (BD) notification for applicable women; however, very little is known about what women knew or felt about BD and related breast cancer (BC) risk before implementation of BD notification laws. Objective: We examined between-race differences in the extent to which having dense breas...
Article
We hypothesized that negatively valenced expectancy violations about the quality of 1's life would predict negative emotionality. We tested this hypothesis in a 4-wave longitudinal study of breast cancer survivors. The findings showed that higher levels of negatively valenced expectancy violation, at earlier time points, were associated with greate...
Article
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Reducing exposure to environmental tobacco smoke significantly reduces lung cancer risk. We used family communication patterns theory and the theory of planned behavior to examine whether perceived norms and lung cancer worry more strongly influenced intentions to avoid environmental tobacco smoke in families higher in conformity and conversation o...
Article
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Objectives: Some US states have mandated that women be informed when they have dense breasts; however, little is known about how general knowledge about breast density (BD) affects related health decision-making. We examined the effects of BD information and imaging technology information on 138 African-American (AA) and European-American (EA) wom...
Article
Full-text available
Assessments of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening rates typically rely on self-reported screening data, which are often incongruent with medical records. We used multilevel models to examine health-related, socio-demographic and psychological predictors of incongruent self-reports for CRC screening among Medicare-insured African Americans (N = 3,740...
Article
Full-text available
A meta-analysis that included more than 1,100 effect sizes tested the predictions of three theoretical perspectives that explain evaluative extremity in social judgment: complexity-extremity theory, subjective group dynamics model, and expectancy-violation theory. The work seeks to understand the ways in which group-based information interacts with...
Article
Full-text available
Parent-physician bereavement meetings may benefit parents by facilitating sense making, which is associated with healthy adjustment after a traumatic event. Prior research suggests a reciprocal relationship between sense making and positive emotions. We analyzed parents’ use of emotion words during bereavement meetings to better understand parents’...
Article
Evidence suggests that minority groups are more likely to exhibit fatalistic beliefs about cancer prevention (FBCP), which are defined as confusion, pessimism, and helplessness about one's ability to prevent cancer. This study examines the socioeconomic and psychosocial predictors of FBCP among older African American men (AAM). AAM (N = 1,666) enro...
Article
Full-text available
Sustainability is important if community health organizations are to be effective in collaborating to achieve long term health goals. We present a multi-method set of longitudinal analyses examining structural markers applied to a group of organizations brought together to reduce cancer disparities among older African American adults. At the overal...
Article
Recent research has shown that alcohol consumption can exacerbate expressions of racial bias by increasing reliance on stereotypes. However, little work has investigated how alcohol affects intergroup evaluations. The current work sought to address the issue in the context of the correspondence between implicit and explicit measures of anti-Black a...
Article
Full-text available
A number of theoretical perspectives suggest that expectancy violations (EVs) threaten a person's sense of meaning and prompt efforts to reinstate meaning. Yet, little to no research has explicitly examined whether EVs predict actual efforts to search for meaning. The current research redresses this gap in the literature among a sample of breast ca...
Article
Full-text available
Little is known about women's knowledge of breast density or between-race differences in this knowledge. In the current study, we examined knowledge of breast density and awareness of its role as a breast cancer risk factor among women who had previously taken part in a breast imaging study. Seventy-seven women (54.5 % Black) returned a survey asse...
Article
We compared negative and positive ads in the context of a fictitious election. Participants read a strong or weak message supporting one candidate (positive ad) or derogating the opposition candidate (negative ad). The strong positive message had a greater impact on attitudes toward the candidates than the weak positive message, but message strengt...
Article
Full-text available
It is important to identify predictors of psychological health among breast cancer patients that can be relatively easily identified by medical care providers. This article investigates the role of one class of such potential predictors: easily identified demographics that have potential social and/or practical implications. Specifically, we examin...
Article
Two studies tested whether increased social motivation was associated with nondeliberative, or direct, effects of descriptive norms and injunctive norms on behavior in the context of the theory of planned behavior (Ajzen, 19911. Ajzen , I. ( 1991 ). The theory of planned behavior . Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes , 50 , 179 – 2...
Article
This research examines the non-deliberative (i.e., direct) effects of injunctive and descriptive norms on behaviors in the context of the theory of planned behavior. In particular it considers the moderating effects of social approval, social motivation, pleasantness/utility, and interpersonal-ness on the non-deliberative effects of the norms on be...
Article
Full-text available
Evidence suggests that more depressed breast cancer patients will less likely adhere to treatment plans. This study presents evidence that the theory of planned behaviour mediates the relation between depression and intentions to adhere to treatment plans and between depression and lack of adherence to medication regime. Two hundred and thirteen wo...
Article
A meta-analysis investigated the effects of perceived injunctive (IN) and descriptive (DN) norms on behaviour (BEH) within the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) in a sample of 196 studies. Two related correlation matrices (pairwise and listwise) were synthesized from the data and used to model the TPB relations with path analyses. Convergent eviden...

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