Mark Lomolino

Mark Lomolino
State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry | SUNY-ESF · Department of Environmental and Forest Biology

Ph.D.

About

125
Publications
51,991
Reads
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9,657
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Introduction
Mark Lomolino currently works at the Department of Environmental and Forest Biology, State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry. Mark does research in Zoology and Ecology. Their current project is 'Of Mice and Mammoths'.
Additional affiliations
July 2001 - present
State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry
Position
  • Professor
June 1990 - June 2000
University of Oklahoma
Position
  • Vertebrate zoologist

Publications

Publications (125)
Article
Full-text available
Modern biogeography now encompasses an impressive diversity of patterns and phenomena of the geography of nature, providing insights fundamental to understanding the forces influencing the spatial and temporal dynamics of biological diversity. However, rather than praise our discipline for its great breadth of visions, our purpose here is to point...
Article
To assess the relative contributions of colonization, speciation and human activities on species richness (S) of mammalian communities among oceanic islands. Palaeo-islands world-wide. We compiled species lists from published works and compared species–area and species–isolation relationships for mammalian taxa of 36 islands over three stages of co...
Article
Full-text available
I describe the set of fundamental principles of biogeography that can serve as an integrative, conceptual framework for unifying and advancing our abilities to explain the geography of life – generally. I assert that patterns of variation of biotas among regions and across geographic gradients result from the very regular patterns of variation in e...
Article
Full-text available
As one moves from the core to the periphery of a species' geographical range, populations occupy less favourable habitats and exhibit lower and more variable densities. Populations along the periphery of the range tend to be more fragmented and, as a result, are less likely to receive immigrants from other populations. A population's probability of...
Article
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The nine currently recognized species of moa (Order – Dinornithiformes; Bonaparte 1853) suffered extinction soon after New Zealand was settled by humans. They were the result of an evolutionary radiation that produced a unique guild of birds – giant, and totally wingless species that evolved in the absence of non-volant mammals. Recent advances in...
Chapter
“Macroecology and the geography of micro-evolution” shifts the focus from macroevolutionary patterns in species richness to micro-evolutionary patterns of biogeographic variation within species. These patterns are driven by natural selection and adaptation, which in turn are driven by variation in environmental characteristics among regions and acr...
Chapter
Evolution occurs not only over time, but across space as well. “Retracing evolution across space and time” explores the sub-discipline of historical biogeography , giving an overview of approaches used to reconstruct the geographic and evolutionary origins of the lineages of natural life forms. Contemporary approaches to mapping these lineages conf...
Chapter
“Dynamic maps of a dynamic planet” introduces the geographic template —highly regular spatial patterns of variation in environmental conditions across the planet. Despite the regular nature of this geographic template at any given time, Earth is a dynamic planet that has undergone geological upheavals over the last three and a half billion years of...
Chapter
How are we to comprehend all of nature’s diversity from the cellular level up through all taxonomic, biological, and ecological levels of organization? “The geography of biological diversity” focuses on the measures and meaning of biological diversity, and the general patterns across the principal geographic dimensions (e.g. latitude, area and isol...
Book
Biogeography: A Very Short Introduction explains how our ability to place life in an explicit geographic context is key to understanding our natural world. The geological evolution of Earth has fundamentally influenced its life forms. Biogeography brings together insights from the fields of genetics, geology, paleontology, geography, anthropology,...
Chapter
Throughout history, insights into understanding the diversity of life forms have come from placing natural phenomena within an explicit geographic context. “Biological diversity and the geography of nature” maps the discoveries of early explorers in the field, from the Age of Enlightenment to the present day. Where do distinct species occur? How an...
Chapter
“The geographic and ecological advance of humanity” argues that the global expansion of the human species was influenced by the same factors that shaped the expansions of other life forms. Our indigenous populations were also strongly influenced by the forces of natural selection, driving human micro-evolution across the geographic template, such a...
Chapter
“The geography of diversification” returns to a central theme of biogeography—that place matters, and that each region, down to an island or lake, can be an evolutionary arena, producing its own distinct plant and animal life. Case studies from the Hawaiian Islands, Madagascar, and the Rift Valley Lakes of East Africa illustrate the phenomenon of a...
Article
Full-text available
To assess whether mammalian species introduced onto islands across the globe have evolved to exhibit body size patterns consistent with the ‘island rule,’, and to test an ecological explanation for body size evolution of insular mammals. Islands worldwide. We assembled data on body mass, geographical characteristics (latitude, maximum elevation) an...
Article
Full-text available
The island rule describes a graded trend in insular populations of vertebrates from gigantism in small species to dwarfism in large species. The dwarfing of large mammals on islands has been observed both in the present fauna and in the fossil record. Elephants, hippopotami, deer, and other species became dwarfed on islands scattered all over the w...
Poster
The geography of biological sound is a largely unexplored topic that exists at the boundary of ecoacoustics and biogeography. Identification and characterization of patterns of biological sound and soundscape variation across the planet may provide insight into the potential for acoustics as a tool for biodiversity monitoring and conservation. Ecoa...
Article
Full-text available
Here we provide an overview of the key empirical discoveries and conceptual advances of the discipline of biogeography, with special emphasis on the development of some of its central ideas from the local knowledge of early civilizations to the globalization of that knowledge, and from the early articulations of its fundamental principles during th...
Article
Full-text available
The physical and biotic environment is often considered the primary driver of functional variation in plant communities. Here, we examine the hypothesis that spatial isolation may also be an important driver of functional variation in plant communities where disturbance and dispersal limitation may prevent species from occupying all suitable habita...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Judging from worldwide patterns, commitment to predator-free island life tends to have significant consequences for the species concerned—for example, marked changes in body size (the island trend). But what would a total lack of ecologically relevant predators have on traits other than body size? For this we evaluated population structure and dyna...
Article
Full-text available
Age-graded fossils of Pleistocene endemic Cretan deer (Candiacervus spp.) reveal unexpectedly high juvenile mortality similar to that reported for extant mainland ruminants, despite the fact that these deer lived in a predator-free environment and became extinct before any plausible date for human arrival. Age profiles show that deer surviving past...
Conference Paper
Insular fossil bovids, ranging in age from the latest Miocene to the Holocene, are widely recorded in Asian and Western Mediterranean islands. Several taxa characterized by different levels of endemism, but no species with an entirely identical adaptation, existed on different islands. Even considering that evolutionary processes, affecting size a...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Plant functional traits are an important driver of ecosystem processes and are increasingly used to quantify variation in community functioning. Although many studies have examined how plant functional traits vary across environmental gradients, few have tested how community functioning changes with spatial isolation....
Article
Aim We assessed the generality of the island rule in a database comprising 1593 populations of insular mammals (439 species, including 63 species of fossil mammals), and tested whether observed patterns differed among taxonomic and functional groups. Location Islands world-wide. Methods We measured museum specimens (fossil mammals) and reviewed the...
Article
AimWe investigated the hypothesis that body size evolution of mammals is strongly influenced by ecological interactions, resulting in evolutionary divergence in body size in species‐rich (e.g. mainland) biotas, and convergence on the size of intermediate but absent species in species‐poor (e.g. insular) biotas. LocationMediterranean palaeo‐islands....
Data
Full-text available
This is Appendix S1 to Body size evolution of palaeo-insular mammals: temporal variations and interspecific interactions, as published in Journal of Biogeography, 2013, 40.
Article
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Many important issues in conservation biology are more clearly visible on islands than on continental mainlands. This chapter summarizes a few of the key topics that concern island managers worldwide, with exemplary habitat case studies from the islands. The chapter considers primarily the land-breeding vertebrate faunas of islands, but only becaus...
Article
We investigated the hypothesis that body size evolution of mammals is strongly influenced by ecological interactions, resulting in evolutionary divergence in body size in species-rich (e.g. mainland) biotas, and convergence on the size of intermediate but absent species in species-poor (e.g. insular) biotas. Location Mediterranean palaeo-islands. M...
Chapter
Biogeography has a long and distinguished history, and one inextricably woven into the historical development of evolutionary biology and ecology. Modern biogeography now includes an impressive diversity of patterns, each of which dealing with some aspect of the spatial variation of nature. Given this, few disciplines can be any more relevant to un...
Article
Full-text available
Article
Aim We investigated the hypothesis that the insular body size of mammals results from selective forces whose influence varies with characteristics of the focal islands and the focal species, and with interactions among species (ecological displacement and release). Location Islands world-wide. Methods We assembled data on the geographic characteris...
Article
Full-text available
Biogeographers study all patterns in the geographic variation of life, from the spatial variation in genetic and physiological characteristics of cells and individuals, to the diversity and dynamics of biological communities among continental biotas or across oceanic archipelagoes. The field of island biogeography, in particular, has provided some...
Article
Full-text available
Charles Darwin's observations and insights continue to inspire nearly all scientists who are captivated by both the marvels and the perils of island life. Here I feature four themes inspired by Darwin's singular insights: themes that may continue to provide valuable lessons for understanding the ecological and evolutionary development of insular bi...
Article
Full-text available
We test the hypothesis that the decline of the endangered American burying beetle (Nicrophorus americanus) from over 90% of its original range is the result of habitat loss and fragmentation of eastern North America. Forest removal at a site in southeastern Oklahoma known to have a significant population of N.americanus gave us a unique opportunity...
Article
Full-text available
1 We expanded the island biogeography paradigm to test whether mammalian communities of the heavily fragmented temperate rain forests of the Olympic Peninsula were influenced by local environmental conditions, biogeographic factors (fragment area and isolation) and characteristics of the surrounding landscape. 2 We used live-trapping, sign surveys...
Article
Full-text available
A general review of the patterns of species richness of insular mammals (Lomolino, 1984a) indicated that richness is determined by interactive as well as additive effects of factors affecting immigration and extinction. The present paper reports that species composition of insular mammals is also influenced by such additive and interactive effects....
Article
Full-text available
Body size is perhaps the most important trait of an organism, affecting all of its physiological and ecological processes and, therefore, fundamentally influencing its ability to survive and reproduce in different environments, including those that have been modified by human activities. We tested the hypothesis that anthropogenic transformation of...
Article
We are currently experiencing a resurgence of interest in ecogeographical rules, which describe general trends in morphology and related traits along geographical gradients. In order to develop a more comprehensive understanding of the generality and underlying causal mechanisms for these patterns, we recommend a new, more integrated research agend...
Article
Full-text available
Patterns in species composition of small mammals on islands of northwestern Lake Huron, USA were studied to test the hypothesis that insular community structure was strongly influenced by immigrant selection, l e, selection for the more vagile species Of 17 insectivores and rodents in the mainland pool nine were detected on at least one of the 25 i...
Article
Full-text available
Aim My goals here are to (1) assess the generality of the island rule – the graded trend from gigantism in small species to dwarfism in larger species – for mammals and other terrestrial vertebrates on islands and island-like ecosystems; (2) explore some related patterns of body size variation in insular vertebrates, in particular variation in body...
Article
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We tested the hypothesis that black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) influence avian community structure on the shortgrass prairie. We surveyed 36 prairie dog towns and 36 paired sites without prairie dogs during summer and fall of 1997, 1998, and 1999 in the Oklahoma Panhandle. Our surveys totaled 9,040 individual observations for 73 avi...
Article
Full-text available
We studied the persistence of 281 towns of the black-tailed prairie dog (Cynomys ludovicianus) from surveys conducted in Oklahoma in 1966 and 1967 and again in 1988 and 1989. Town size during initial surveys tended to increase along a northwesterly gradient toward the panhandle of the State, and larger towns tended to occur in clusters while small...
Article
Full-text available
We capitalized on a regional-scale, anthropogenic experiment—the reduction of black-tailed prairie dog (Cynomys ludovicianus) towns across the Great Plains of North America—to test the hypothesis that decline of this species has led to declines in diversity of native grassland vertebrates of this region. We compared species richness and species com...
Article
Full-text available
Aim We studied the temporal and spatial patterns in deforestation and community structure of mammals in a fragmented old-growth, temperate rain forest to test the hypothesis that anthropogenic habitat conversion advances in a nonrandom manner across native landscapes, and that its effects on ecological communities are both persistent and predictabl...
Article
Full-text available
Aim To evaluate the utility of island biogeography theory as a model for understanding and conserving native communities of nonvolant terrestrial vertebrates at prairie dog towns. Location Oklahoma Panhandle, USA. Methods We surveyed mammal, reptile and amphibian communities on 36 black-tailed prairie dog (Cynomys ludovicianus) towns during the sum...
Chapter
Biogeography has a long and distinguished history, and one inextricably woven into the historical development of evolutionary biology and ecology. Modern biogeography now includes an impressive diversity of patterns, each of which dealing with some aspect of the spatial variation of nature. Given this, few disciplines can be any more relevant to un...
Article
Full-text available
Despite the broad and relatively stable distribution of the black-tailed prairie dog ( Cynomys ludovicianus) throughout much of the Pleistocene and Holocene, anthropogenic activities have reduced the current range of this native grassland species and its associated biotic community to ,5% of its historic range (approximately 1800—Miller et al. 1990...
Article
Full-text available
AimTo demonstrate a new and more general model of the species–area relationship that builds on traditional models, but includes the provision that richness may vary independently of island area on relatively small islands (the small island effect).LocationWe analysed species–area patterns for a broad diversity of insular biotas from aquatic and ter...
Article
Full-text available
The species-area relationship (i.e., the relationship between area and the number of species found in that area) is one of longest and most frequently studied patterns in nature. Yet there remain some important and interesting questions on the nature of this relationship, its causality, quantification and application for both ecologists and conserv...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract Studies of elevation clines in diversity and composition of ecological communities date back to the origins of biogeography. A modern resurgence of interests in these elevational clines is likely to contribute important insights for developing a more general theory of species diversity. In order to gain a more comprehensive understanding o...
Article
Full-text available
Studies of elevation clines in diversity and composition of ecological communities date back to the origins of biogeography. A modern resurgence of interests in these elevational clines is likely to contribute important insights for developing a more general theory of species diversity. In order to gain a more comprehensive understanding of geograp...
Article
Full-text available
1 We expanded the island biogeography paradigm to test whether mammalian communities of the heavily fragmented temperate rain forests of the Olympic Peninsula were influenced by local environmental conditions, biogeographic factors (fragment area and isolation) and characteristics of the surrounding landscape.2 We used live-trapping, sign surveys a...
Chapter
Full-text available
Few if any serious scientists question that we are witnessing an acceleration of extinction rates. The ongoing loss in biological diversity far exceeds what paleontologists consider background levels and may well, if projections are accurate, rival some of the mass extinctions of the geological record (Temple, 1986; Wilson, 1988 and 1992; World Con...
Article
Full-text available
We studied the influence of corridors on the community structure of old-growth forest mammals across a fragmented ecosystem, the Olympic National Forest, Washington, USA. This region of once contiguous forest has been transformed by logging into a mosaic of landscape features including clearcuts, second-growth forest, and old-growth forest patches...
Article
Full-text available
We studied the influence of corridors on the community structure of old-growth forest mammals across a fragmented ecosystem, the Olympic National Forest, Washington, USA. This region of once contiguous forest has been transformed by logging into a mosaic of landscape features including clearcuts, second-growth forest, and old-growth forest patches...
Article
Full-text available
We capitalized on the anthropogenic, large-scale ''experiment'' of defores- tation in the temperate rain forests of the Olympic Peninsula, Washington State, USA, to test whether mammalian-community structure is significantly influenced by anthropogenic transformation of this landscape (principal macrohabitats include continuous, old-growth forest;...
Article
Full-text available
MacArthur and Wilson's equilibrium theory revolutionized the field of island biogeography and, to a large degree, ecology as well. The theory, which quickly became the ruling paradigm of island biogeography, has changed little over the past three decades. It has not kept pace with relevant theory and our growing appreciation for the complexity of n...
Article
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MacArthur and Wilson’s equilibrium theory of island biogeography quickly became the paradigm of the field in the 1960s and has strongly influenced this and other disciplines of ecology and conservation biology for the past three decades. Recently, however, a growing number of ecologists have begun to question whether the theory remains a useful par...
Article
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Abstract Aim We examined the range contraction of 309 declining species of animals and plants to determine if the contraction dynamics better matched predictions based on the demographic characteristics of historical populations (demographic hypothesis) or based on the contagion-like spread of extinction forces (contagion hypothesis). Location Spec...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract I present an alternative to the equilibrium theory of island biogeography, one which is based on the premise that many of the more general patterns in insular community structure result from, not despite, nonrandom variation among species. For the sake of simplicity, the model is limited to patterns and processes operating over scales of e...