Mark Lescroart

Mark Lescroart
University of Nevada, Reno | UNR · Department of Psychology

Ph.D.

About

37
Publications
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489
Citations

Publications

Publications (37)
Article
It has been argued that scene-selective areas in the human brain represent both the 3D structure of the local visual environment and low-level 2D features (such as spatial frequency) that provide cues for 3D structure. To evaluate the degree to which each of these hypotheses explains variance in scene-selective areas, we develop an encoding model o...
Article
Convolutional neural networks (ConvNets) have achieved almost human-level performance on object recognition tasks, and voxel-wise encoding models based on ConvNet features yield accurate predictions of human brain activity. This suggests that ConvNets might provide important insights into brain function. However, the features derived from ConvNets...
Article
Full-text available
The input to our visual system shifts every time we move our eyes. To maintain a stable percept of the world, visual representations must be updated with each saccade. Near the time of a saccade, neurons in several visual areas become sensitive to the regions of visual space that their receptive fields occupy after the saccade. This process, known...
Article
Full-text available
Perception of natural visual scenes activates several functional areas in the human brain, including the Parahippocampal Place Area (PPA), Retrosplenial Complex (RSC), and the Occipital Place Area (OPA). It is currently unclear what specific scene-related features are represented in these areas. Previous studies have suggested that PPA, RSC, and/or...
Article
Full-text available
Surface visualizations of fMRI provide a comprehensive view of cortical activity. However, surface visualizations are difficult to generate and most common visualization techniques rely on unnecessary interpolation which limits the fidelity of the resulting maps. Furthermore, it is difficult to understand the relationship between flattened cortical...
Article
A network of areas in the human brain-including the Parahippocampal Place Area (PPA), the Occipital Place Area (OPA), and the Retrosplenial Cortex (RSC)-represent visual scenes. However, it is still unclear whether these areas represent high-level features (such as local scene structure or scene category), or low-level features (such as high spatia...
Article
Intermediate visual areas (V4 and areas in lateral occipital cortex) respond selectively to variation in color, texture, motion, and shape. One goal of vision research is to make computational models that can predict responses to arbitrary stimuli varying in all these dimensions. However, most studies of these areas have only examined one or two di...
Article
Full-text available
There are two dominant models for the functional organization of brain regions underlying object recognition. One model postulates category-specific modules while the other proposes a distributed representation of objects with generic visual features. Functional imaging techniques relying on metabolic signals, such as fMRI and optical intrinsic sig...
Article
Vision is mediated by a set of hierarchically organized cortical areas that represent information at different levels of complexity. Peripheral visual areas represent simple image-level features such as oriented edges, textures and motion energy. Central visual areas represent the semantic categories of objects and scenes. Intermediate areas are th...
Conference Paper
Higher mammals use different hierarchical levels of visual information to guide goal-oriented behavior. In the brain, visual features, objects and categories are encoded in inferotemporal (IT) cortex, but the neu- ronal organization linking these three levels of information is un- known. Using dense untargeted electrophysiological recordings and in...
Article
The identity of an object is not only specified by its parts but also by the relations among the parts. Rearranging parts can produce a completely different object, in the same manner as rearranging the phonemes in "fur" can yield "rough." How does the visual system represent the relative positions of parts? Between-part relations can be characteri...
Article
Evidence from imaging, electrophysiology, and behavior supports the idea that objects are represented as collections of parts, but few studies have investigated how the spatial relationships between parts are represented. Such relations are critical since changing them can change the object, just as changing the order of phonemes can change the mea...
Article
Tickling a rat's whiskers after it has a stroke prevents brain damage
Article
Full-text available
Late ventral visual areas generally consist of cells having a significant degree of translation invariance. Such a "bag of features" representation is useful for the recognition of individual objects; however, it seems unable to explain our ability to parse a scene into multiple objects and to understand their spatial relationships. We review sever...
Article
We like hues that we associate with pleasant things
Article
Many theories of object recognition assume that the representation of an object specifies its axis structure (e.g., Marr, 1982). Can LO (an area critical for shape recognition) distinguish between highly similar objects, all with the same shaped parts, that differ only in the relative positions of their parts, i.e., in their axis structures? We tes...
Article
In an event-related fMRI-A paradigm, switching the relative positions of two separated objects, so that an elephant above a bus is followed by the bus above the elephant, results in a much greater release from adaptation in LOC than a translation of equal extent of the original scene (Hayworth et al, 2008). Could this greater sensitivity to relativ...
Article
Non-accidental shape properties (NAPs) are those that are invariant under rotation in depth, such as whether a contour is straight or curved. Metric properties (MPs), such as the degree of curvature of a contour, can vary continuously with depth rotation. NAPs allow facile recognition when an object is viewed at an orientation not previously experi...
Article
Viewing an image sequence of faces of two different people results in a greater BOLD response in the fusiform face area (FFA) compared to when the sequence is composed of identical images of the same person. However, changes in identity necessarily involve changes in the image. Is the release from adaptation a result of a change in face identity pe...
Article
People from a variety of developed world cultures express relatively similar preferences for scenes, preferring images that depict: a) large expanses (“vista”), b) where something is likely to happen (“mystery”), c) where there is a vantage point where they can see a lot and not be seen themselves (“refuge”), and d) natural rather than human-made e...
Article
From a 200 msec masked presentation of a minimal scene, composed of two separated objects, one above the other, subjects can name both objects and report which one is on top. This capacity poses a challenge to feature hierarchy models (e.g., HMAX) which achieve translation invariant recognition by representing an object as a list of ‘positionless’...
Article
Despite widespread incorporation in theoretical accounts of visual cognition and the apparent ease of humans to employ prepositions (e.g., “above”) or to reason about spatial relations, no neural evidence has ever been reported for structural descriptions (SDs), which make explicit a distinction between the shape of the entities in a scene and the...
Article
Full-text available
Many of the phenomena underlying shape recognition can be derived from an assumption that the representation of simple parts can be understood in terms of independent dimensions of generalized cones, e.g., whether the axis of a cylinder is straight or curved or whether the sides are parallel or nonparallel. What enables this sensitivity? One explan...
Article
Viewing a sequence of faces of two different people results in a greater Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent (BOLD) response in FFA compared to a sequence of identical faces. Changes in identity, however, necessarily involve changes in the image. Is the release from adaptation a result of a change in face identity, per se, or could it be an effect th...
Article
A change in the basic-level class when viewing a sequence of two objects produces a large release from adaptation in LOC compared to when the images are identical. Is this due to a change in semantics or shape? In an fMRI-adaptation experiment, subjects viewed a sequence of two objects and judged whether the stimuli were identical in shape. Differe...

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